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Confuson on first scope

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#1 torsinadoc

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 02:51 PM

I was leaning towards the C6-SGT w either VX or G5 Mount as my first scope. my plans are mainly Planet viewing/photo with ability to view DSO. Im a little confused about this scope set up or a good refractor w similar mount.

#2 csrlice12

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 02:58 PM

For planetary, the C6 will probably do, but for really good AP, I'd go a little lighter and go with a smaller triplet or short f/l ED refractor (which may be a triplet!).

#3 torsinadoc

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 04:57 PM

Ill look into it. What type of mount? I dont mind getting a heavier mount that I can grow into in the future.

#4 rigel123

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 06:20 PM

If you have any thoughts of DSO astrophotography then go with at least an Atlas class mount. You can put a C6 on it as well as a smaller refractor to image different targets. If you start out with a lightweight mount you may be looking for a more robust one that can handle the weight of the larger OTA's. This would include the Atlas, Celestron CGEM and the Ioptron.

#5 torsinadoc

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 08:30 PM

Im looking at
SV110-25SV
SV Raptor 90 mm Apo (reduced to near the SV110 price). I guess the question is should I take the smaller APO or larger 110. Could I even tell the difference in optics for viewing or AP?

#6 DHurst

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 09:17 PM

If this is a first scope, I'd recommend considering putting AP on the back burner for a while until you acquaint yourself with a new scope and the sky. IMHO learning the sky and viewing the planets are best acomplished with a Dobsonian of 8 to 10". If you're dead set on an equatorial mount, this is where you should put most of your money, especially if you are going to contemplate AP. A good mount can last a lifetime. If you're serious about the hobby you'll end up with many scopes over the years. Is cost a limitation?

#7 rigel123

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 10:04 PM

Im looking at
SV110-25SV
SV Raptor 90 mm Apo (reduced to near the SV110 price). I guess the question is should I take the smaller APO or larger 110. Could I even tell the difference in optics for viewing or AP?


I'd go with the triplet Raptor, less chance for any Chromatic Aberration, but that is just me, I've never owned a doublet.

#8 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 07:52 AM

Im looking at
SV110-25SV
SV Raptor 90 mm Apo (reduced to near the SV110 price). I guess the question is should I take the smaller APO or larger 110. Could I even tell the difference in optics for viewing or AP?


If your plans are for viewing and photographing the planets, the C-6 is a better choice and a 8 inch would be even better. Apo and ED refractors are great scopes but they give away too much aperture for planetary viewing and photography.

Jon

#9 torsinadoc

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 08:19 AM

Thanks for all the information. This is such an overwhelming process. Just a little back ground. I have spent the last year or so working with Binoculars to learn the sky. recently completed the Astro Leag. Messier list and working on deep sky list. I enjoy the process of finding the objects myself. Typically I view 25% from my house (way to much light due to a business that decides to flood the neighborhood with lights), 85% from a near by state park. There needs to be some portability. I had looked at 8" dobs, C6 and refractors for my first scope. I want something fairly easy to maintain, quick to set up (a lot of viewing starts at 4 am for me). I plan on trying some astrophoto later in the year (maybe). My concern with the dob is that it appears so large and concerned with portability. My concern with the C6 SGT would be spending time trying to get the alignment right. I would like to have something that I can grow into in a year and do some AP which doesnt appear to be possible with the dob. That left C6 and refractor.

#10 torsinadoc

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 08:22 AM

If this is a first scope, I'd recommend considering putting AP on the back burner for a while until you acquaint yourself with a new scope and the sky. IMHO learning the sky and viewing the planets are best acomplished with a Dobsonian of 8 to 10". If you're dead set on an equatorial mount, this is where you should put most of your money, especially if you are going to contemplate AP. A good mount can last a lifetime. If you're serious about the hobby you'll end up with many scopes over the years. Is cost a limitation?


Cost. thats relative I guess. I was wanting to stay below 2000 but would go higher for a good piece that would last me. I know after the last year, of binocular viewing it would get use if it was easy to set up and portable.

#11 MikeBOKC

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 08:53 AM

My nickle's worth: Dob for visual (not very expensive) and C6 or C8 on the new Celestron VX mount (again not that expensive) for evebntual AP. As for the time spent on alignment, that's going to be absolutely necessary for AP anyway. Both could be had for around your stated budget, though camera equipment no matter what you get will go well beyind that.

#12 torsinadoc

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 09:35 AM

Thanks. Wont include camera

#13 Darenwh

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 02:14 PM

My nickle's worth: Dob for visual (not very expensive) and C6 or C8 on the new Celestron VX mount (again not that expensive) for evebntual AP. As for the time spent on alignment, that's going to be absolutely necessary for AP anyway. Both could be had for around your stated budget, though camera equipment no matter what you get will go well beyind that.


Advantage Newt over SCT for visual. EQ mounting one is harder though due to the longer tube so it depends on if the mount will hold the Newt if you are doing AP. Lets say you get an 8" SCT and have two hours to use the scope. For an 8" newt you can seal the back with a fan blowing air out and this will both help cool the mirror and remove some of the boundary layer issues. While the scope is cooling you can still use it and, depending on how well your fan is working, may be able to get nearly as good an image as you can after the mirror cools. Now the SCT will likely need a CAT cooler which would keep you from using it while it's cooling. You could loose half or more of your observing time. An 8" or larger scope will let you view DSO's quite well.

Now lets talk about the two refractors. If you plan to do AP in the future get the APO. An Achro can be a good scope but the unfocused colors makes them a poor choice for AP. For visual it's a little better but it still can wash out some details on planetary. The APO will do very well and is close enough in size even for visual that I would recommend it over the achro.

Now for mounts. Get the best you can. Overmounting is way better than undermounting. CGEM, Atlas, or even bigger if you can afford it. Get the best mount you can if you plan to do AP in the future. If you decide not to pursue AP a better mount still makes all the difference for visual if you have a long or heavy scope.

#14 csrlice12

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 03:16 PM

Did you enjoy the binoculars, does actual viewing interest you more then the AP? I tend to agree with Daren. It appears you have taken the time to think about this and aren't just jumping in with both feet. You just might want to consider getting a good mount with a smaller refractor on it like the AT65 (many have taken marvelous wide-field photos with this scope) and also get a basic 6 - 8" dob (you can find one used for cheap) so that while your frac is doing its AP thing, you'll have that dob to fill your eyes with photons.

#15 torsinadoc

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 07:24 PM

Thanks for the information. I enjoy searching for objects with binoculars. Now sure about AP since I have not tried that before. I assume with my OCD :help:, I will jump in whole hog.

#16 csrlice12

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 07:42 PM

AP can get expensive, very expensive. You could start with a basic CG5 Motorized Mount and like the small widefield refractor and do some short time exposures, and get some of what I've seen on this forum, pretty good shots. Look on the AP forum and you'll find some examples. The thing to remember is that AP is also very time consuming, there is not just taking the pics, it takes time to setup/teardown, and there is the Stacking/Processing when you get home (and that can be very time consuming). I'd try that before I'd spend thousands on equipment. I'm assuming you already have a camera/computer(s)/Programs, and you'll also have to buy some camera adapters. This setup would also allow you, should you find that AP just isn't your thing, to easily be used as a widefield visual scope. You could also upgrade to a much bigger visual Refractor and even a 6" Newt to the CG5 (I'd reccomend a nice 5" Refractor myself). While the CG5 is an "Entry Level" AP Mount, it is a fantastic visual mount.






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