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What is your most memorable Lunar sight?

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#26 JerryOrr

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 11:59 AM

Glimpsing portions of Rimae Triesnecker with a 90mm refractor at 91x. At first thinking I was just imagining it, then, in the occasional moment of perfect seeing, knowing for certain I was seeing it. Especially pleasing because Virtual Moon Atlas claims that one needs at least a 300mm instument to see it!

#27 Otto Piechowski

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 12:10 PM

TV transmissions from the moon during Apollo 8. Two different ones; the earth rise captured by Borman. And then the panorama of the moon passing by as they read the beginning of the book of Genesis; the first creation story; all on Christmas eve.

#28 buddyjesus

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 09:16 PM

Mine was while watching Carl Sagan's Cosmos. There was a re-enactment of some Canterbury monks that all looked up and saw a lunar impact on the far side of the moon. Neat mystery whether it was aerial phenomenon or lunar.

#29 cpsTN

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Posted 16 March 2013 - 12:31 PM

All of these are great.

JerryOrr: If I am reading the size correctly from VMA, the diameter of Rimae Triesnecker is about a mile. Why do they say you should need a 12" scope to see something that is over 1500m wide? Am I reading the size correctly?

Otto: If anyone read from the Bible during a mission now, some Atheists and the ACLU would have a cow!

#30 David Knisely

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 01:37 AM

All of these are great.

JerryOrr: If I am reading the size correctly from VMA, the diameter of Rimae Triesnecker is about a mile. Why do they say you should need a 12" scope to see something that is over 1500m wide? Am I reading the size correctly?

Otto: If anyone read from the Bible during a mission now, some Atheists and the ACLU would have a cow!


Actually, small linear features can be detected by telescopes that are much smaller than more extended features like craters. A 12 inch should be able to show craterlets as the small pits they are down to a size of around 0.75 miles (1.2 km), but some narrow linear features may be glimpsed on the surface that are only 70 yards across. This is due to their simpler diffraction structure. Clear skies to you.

#31 azure1961p

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 08:29 AM

On that note I recall Patrick Moore in one of the tables and indexes in the back of a book he wrote on the solar system claimed linear features like rilles and such being detected at 1/10 the dawes limit and in one case aseperate account was had with the Harvard Refractor on a 4human hair at something in the neighborhood of 1000 feet distance that equated to FOURTEEN times finer than its rated Dawes.mething to consider, its been stated a white line on a black background will appear wider than a black line on a light background - an effect of diffraction.

Pete

#32 Otto Piechowski

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 03:25 PM

Yes, that was a good one!

If the asteroid that's passing 30K kilometers from Mars, were to hit Mars, it would generate an explosion of 1 trillion megatons. Would the flash be visible from earth?

#33 LivingNDixie

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 04:37 PM

I have a few:
Seeing lunar sunset at Messier and Messier A, the shadow went on for miles and miles.

Glimpsing Mare Orientale.

Copernicus crater under awesome seeing.

#34 Reverend-JT

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 08:15 AM

TV transmissions from the moon during Apollo 8. Two different ones; the earth rise captured by Borman. And then the panorama of the moon passing by as they read the beginning of the book of Genesis; the first creation story; all on Christmas eve.


Just reading this gave me goosebumps...I'm going to like it here.

#35 Steve Daniel

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 09:59 AM

Watching sunset on some mountain peak at the limb. No idea which mountain. Great seeing, and over the 90 or so minutes I watched, I could see the line between night and day move up the mountain, the lit part getting smaller and smaller, until it was gone. Who says the moon is unchanging?

#36 chaoscosmos

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 07:30 AM

More than 20 years ago I was viewing the moon through a small refractor at night when a goose, surely in migration, flying very high up, suddenly and without warning passed right through the center of my view of luna. It was such an unexpected and magical moment that it gave me, well...... goose bumps. It was something that I'll never forget.

#37 buddyjesus

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 04:17 PM

Mine was just about a year or two ago as after about 25 years of astronomy I rarely looked at the moon. I always just dismissed every feature as either a crater or a mountain and didn't interest me. Then one night the moon was about 4/5th full and I saw what I thought was a crater with bent rays. I looked it up in Rukl and saw that it was Reiter gamma and not rays at all! Then I looked up this feature online and saw that there is still some contention as for what made it. Been hooked ever since looking for smaller and smaller details in the Lunar 100 and 200(everything that is visible in my aperture.)

#38 Asbytec

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 04:36 PM

One night, after some prodding from Pete (azure), the seeing calmed and the Cat's Paw and Sabine C, which I had been pursuing and almost observing for some time, just sat there clear as a bell.

Or, maybe it was the Plato crater challenge.

#39 rookie

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 05:44 PM

The LRO images of Alan Shepard's footprints from Apollo 14 that reveal he was only 100 ft from Cone Crater.
Tough Moonwalk

#40 contrailmaker

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 01:21 AM

Gosh, I've been a Lunartic for so long. There are just too many to single out just one.

-Lunar eclipses, so many
-Saturn occultation (in plain daylight)
-Seeing sunrise/sunset rays is always fun and memorable
-Every time I see the Alpine Rille
-Finding an elusive volcanic dome

cm

#41 Kraus

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 02:31 PM


Like Ms. Carol, mine was a sunrise except I don't know what the crater was called.

I saw light just hitting the top edge of a crater. Three white floating specks hovered. As time passed, the specks grew downwards to meet the rest of the rim.

My other memorable moment is when I first employed an ND-25 filter, a yellow-orange filter and a blue filter. Wow! Craters and rills just showed their stuff. I never look at the moon without them. And my 7mm Nagler almost makes it feel as if I'm floating above the surface. I'm that close.

#42 Sarkikos

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 09:40 AM

My most memorable sight of the moon was on 20 July 1969, as a little kid, lying on the grass in what was then Salisbury, Rhodesia (now Harare, Zimbabwe), gazing at the moon and thinking, "Two Americans are walking on it right now."


:waytogo:

Mike

#43 Sarkikos

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 09:52 AM

This is one of my most memorable lunar sights:

Quincunx Spotted on the Terminator!

Here's another:

Chocolate Donut, Anyone?

Mike

#44 dgg99

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 10:27 AM

Mine is probably an observation of one of the lava flows in central Mare Imbrium. Attached is an image I took that night; it is very similar to the view I had through the eyepiece.

See, for example:
http://www.lpod.org/...-2004-07-19.htm

Attached Files



#45 Silver Bear

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 07:23 PM

Since I am just starting out, my experience is limited. That said...

...this month, I chanced a look at the moon when the terminator was just clearing Sinus Iridium and the Jura Mountains.

Absolutely breath-taking the way the sun cast such long shadows, highlighting the mountain ring and the two promontories at either end.

#46 Sarkikos

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 08:04 PM

I never tire of seeing that area of the Moon.

Mike

#47 REC

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 07:59 AM

Oh, that's a tough one. Planes going across the full Moon when it's just starting to rise. Bat's to are cool.

First time seeing the Lunar X when I was not looking for it.

First few days of the moon when it has all kinds of weird lights on the rim.

Lastly, first time looking at it through a Binoviewer and saying "WOW"

Bob

#48 jonbosley

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 10:45 AM

Easy one for me, England 20 July 1969,5 year old child gazing at an old fuzzy black and white TV in the school assembly hall as a big spaceman's boot touched the Sea of Tranquility. That evening I asked my long passed mother "where were they"? She pointed up to the moon and said "up there". I have never stopped looking since.
Thank you Apollo 11!

#49 Ben Therrell

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 01:17 AM

Sunrise on the Liebig Wall (runs into Gassendi) is a very interesting view. Takes about 1.5 hrs to complete.

#50 Carl12

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 05:48 PM

Mine wasn't through a telescope, but on the internet. I was surfing pictures from a NASA surveyor craft, when I started to notice that some rilles are in fact crater chains. I would see a rille looking like they normally do, but then along its path I would note a series of closely placed craters forming the rille shape. I was left with the question of just how many rilles are formed in this way. And can the phenomenon be seen in telescopes?

I'm afraid I took no notes. Anyone interested would need to find the right images by themselves. Sorry about that!






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