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Televue 60 - Any Thoughts?

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#1 KarlL

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:31 PM

Everyone should ask how I've gone from considering a long-focus, relatively large refractor to a small diameter APO in a very short period of time. I've done alot of thinking about how likely it is that I would complete a build project and use the resulting scope. It's a matter of convenience and storage space. I'm not expecting miracles from 60mm. "Grab-and-go" would get much more use.

I'm still very new around here, so perhaps I don't know how to use Search, but I searched under "Televue 60" and didn't find anything useful. Am I missing something? I did read the review and found it very helpful.

Any experience with this scope?

Regards,

Karl

#2 t.r.

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:33 PM

Try searching it on google...the search engine here is finicky at best. Google will lead you to articles and posts here on CN. Having read your introduction post, I don't think you will be happy with only 60mm's getting back into the hobby. Put the apo designation aside...it is not magic. You are on the right track thinking 5" Mak or perhaps a 6" SCT. These could easily be your one scope IMO. I like 6", because according to "The Backyard Astronomers Guide" 6" will get you a view of every type of object astronomy has to offer, excluding galaxy clusters...according to the table in the book anyways.

#3 BCNGreyCat

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:40 PM

It's an incredible little APO. Ed Ting has a great review on his web.

The following is yet another one:

http://www.scopeviews.co.uk/TV60.htm

I too have a TV60 and I carry it whenever I am travelling. It needs no time to cool down. And very excellent for observing moon, bright DSO, even planet. With a 15mm or 20mm plossl and a 3-6 zoom, you don't need any other eyepieces at all.

#4 Binojunky

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 04:50 PM

Well if you are in Canada good luck, I,ve E-mailed a local retailer of astro gear who are showing one in stock to confirm it is in stock and available for imediate delivery or would have to be ordered and never heard a thing back, they were one of several Canadian retailers who seemed to show zero interest, a lot of retailers tend to show stuff in stock to snag a sale when in fact it has to be ordered in with a considerable wait in some cases.I found that out earlier in the year the hard way,JMTCW,DA.

#5 plyscope

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 05:00 PM

I have owned one for a few years now. The reviews say it all really. Wonderful scope, great for daytime and night sky and excellent for travel. With a 10x50 binocular and the TV60 you can be happy for hours at a time.

link to picture

#6 Scott Beith

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 06:08 PM

http://www.cloudynig...tv60vstak60.pdf

http://www.cloudynig...php?item_id=968

http://www.scoperevi...m/page1u.html#4

http://www.astromart...?article_id=291

http://www.scopeviews.co.uk/TV60.htm



#7 chboss

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 09:02 PM

For the best 60mm APO you might also consider the Takahashi FS-60CB or the FS-60Q.
Price is in a similar range and you will get a fluorite doublet that beats the ED design hands down.

just my 2 Cents
Chris

#8 Scott Beith

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 10:15 PM

The first link I posted runs those two side by side. :)

#9 chboss

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 11:40 PM

Hi Scott

Yes, thanks for posting the link.
It is definitely a question of taste and how much one is ready to spend.
I have owned a TV Pronto years ago that was a fantastic small scope, returning to the small diameter I prefered the FS-60Q. ;)

BTW a smallish ED Borg would also be an interesting alternative. :)

regards
Chris

#10 Scott Beith

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 11:43 PM

There is always the option to spend more. ;)

I haven't owned a TV or a Tak yet but if I get the chance I will add a Tak FS152 to the mix. :)

#11 telescopemullet

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 12:44 AM

For the best 60mm APO you might also consider the Takahashi FS-60CB or the FS-60Q.
Price is in a similar range and you will get a fluorite doublet that beats the ED design hands down.
Chris


I just purchased the latter scope mentioned above and it is indeed a very fine instrument. I was shocked by the image quality when pushed with a 5mm eyepiece, much detail in Jupiter coud be seen.

#12 Traveler

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 04:09 AM

+1 for the Takahashi FS-60CB.

Its the telescope i use the most on those nights after work. A light Gitzo Carbon tripod and a couple of ep's is all that you need. It is a very sharp telescope where stars are pinpoint.

Try this link for a great review from the great Ed Ting.

#13 Astrojensen

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 04:21 AM

I really like 60mm's. They're so portable and handy and I like the challenge of using them to see difficult things. They won't show as much right away as a big scope, but used with patience and diligence, they will show a lot.

Personally, I prefer longer focal lengths, like 700mm - 900mm. My wonderful Zeiss Telemator has 63mm aperture and 840mm focal length. I can still get a 3° field with 2" eyepieces. My 30mm ES 82 shows a wonderful image. On double stars it will take very high magnifications. I've used it at 336x on a number of occasions.

There can be a minimum aperture fever, too!


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#14 Mark9473

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 04:41 AM

I can't imagine why y'all encourage a guy who's considering a 60mm as his only scope. A short focus 80mm would be just as grab&go and will show a lot more on every type of target in the night sky. Larger than that and you give up on the portability and convenience IMO, but there's no good reason to go for something as tiny as a 60mm.

#15 Kon Dealer

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 04:49 AM

60mm scope = 2827mm2
80mm scope = 5026mm2

This is a bit of a no-brainer.

#16 Traveler

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 06:20 AM

Hi Mark,

I gave the OP an answer on his question about a 60mm refractor.
In my experience a 60mm refractor is not a (too) small instrument for some serious observations. There is a lot to enjoy and to see with a 60mm.

#17 tomharri

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 06:45 AM

You are going to miss alot with just a 60mm. You will be saying to yourself 'did I just see something there?' And you will never know what that blurry blob was, or if you really saw it.

I tried a 50mm, then a 60mm, then at 75mm things started to be seen. And you could start to use MAGNIFICATION.

Finally settled at 90mm as my smallest scope because you can goto 300x on the planets and see real details at Mars and Jupiter.

#18 Gert K A

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 07:00 AM

I agree.. actually I agree with all that is said so far:
60mm will make you miss out, it’s a no go as the only scope imo. at a minimum aim at a 80mm for that
and this for so many reasons, but perhaps especially because of how much planetary suffers.
That said tiny scopes are huge fun and does challenge you’re observing technique (and patience :waytogo:) in the most entertaining way.
They are so easy to bring that you will get “star time” where there would not have been otherwise.
So +1 as a +2 on a tiny scope lol

#19 t.r.

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 07:45 AM

Ding Ding! 90mm for me too as I have stated elsewhere.

#20 Madratter

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 10:26 AM

I'm not a believer in short f/ratio, small refractors as a general purpose scope, apo or not, for visual work.

#21 Astrojensen

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 11:06 AM

I can't imagine why y'all encourage a guy who's considering a 60mm as his only scope. A short focus 80mm would be just as grab&go and will show a lot more on every type of target in the night sky. Larger than that and you give up on the portability and convenience IMO, but there's no good reason to go for something as tiny as a 60mm.


Well, I used a 50mm f/17 Zeiss refractor as my only scope for about three years. I saw a truckload of stuff during those three years, because I made it a challenge to find out exactly where the limits to its performance were. I never wrote off an object (within reason, I didn't waste my time with 14th mag galaxies, obviously, but 12th magnitude was fair game!) as "impossible", without actually verifying with an earnest attempt to see it, whatever the numbers said.

Using a small scope to observe (relatively) challenging objects is not for everyone, but for me it made a heck of a lot of fun. Inspired by Jay Reynolds Freeman, I began a Herschel 400 survey with it and finished a couple of constellations. I only stopped because I didn't have a correct image diagonal for it at that time, which made starhopping a tiring process. The H400 survey was continued with my 63mm Zeiss Telementor and later Telemator, which do have a correct image diagonal. I have seen over 200 H400's with them.

The 50mm Zeiss was an extremely good double star telescope and I could detect many difficult pairs. I also had fun with it as a lunar-planetary telescope. Some years later I made a new OTA for it and took it with me when I attended a school far from home. It was a smash hit among the other students, who spend bitterly cold nights outside with me, just to get a glimpse of lunar craters, the belts of Jupiter or his moons. The Jovian moons were a favorite.

A 50mm scope is big enough to show all the major sights in the solar system and fine examples of every class of object, with the only exception being globular clusters (in the northern hemisphere). It can only resolve some outlying members of M13 with great difficulty. Omega Centauri would be a whole different experience, but it is reserved for southern hemisphere dwellers.

With the right attitude, any telescope can be tremendously satisfying. With the wrong one, they are all too small. Most people are somewhere in between, usually ending up with the largest scope they can possibly set up themselves.


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#22 Mark9473

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 11:36 AM

Sure Thomas they can be fun, I won't disagree on that. But globular clusters *is* a big exception especially since these are among the brightest DSOs to be found. And let's be honest, for lunar and planetary observing every centimer of aperture counts big time.

I had a 60 mm as my only scope when I was young, and had all the right attitude and enthousiasm you could ask for, and better eyes as well as better skies than I have now, and I still won't recommend one. This is not about "never big enough"; I spent three decades with telescopes no larger than 90 mm.

#23 Astrojensen

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 12:07 PM

Aperture always wins over less aperture, given equal quality. I don't disagree that a somewhat larger scope won't show more, a lot more, even. Still, for some, a 60mm, or a 50mm, is enough.

Today my most used scopes are my 6" refractor and my 12" dob. Did I grow tired of my 63mm Zeiss? No. I still use it frequently. Are the bigger scopes more fun? No. It's a different kind of fun, in a way, but not more fun than the smaller scopes.

For some, a 60mm might be all that is needed to maintain a lifelong interest in astronomy. If it was the only scope I had, I would still be out there every clear night.

In the end, selecting a scope is a highly personal thing. We can only give advice about what worked for us. I find dobsonians a thrill, others hate them. I find small scopes to be interesting, others find them boring.

And I personally find that one only truly values aperture, if one has observed diligently for years with a small scope.

Would I recommend a 60mm as a first scope? Difficult to say. I find it difficult to recommend the 60mm's on the market today and people seem to have less patience than they used to have, especially kids. I have lent a 63mm Zeiss to a friend as a first scope and he is happy with it. I wouldn't have any qualms recommending a Zeiss Telementor as a first scope, especially if the user understood that he wouldn't get color HD Hubble images in any scope anyway.

If a Zeiss isn't available and the budget is limited, I often recommend a 80mm - 100mm Sky-Watcher achromat to beginners. Some have emailed me later and thanked me, saying they got an excellent scope that was easy to use.


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#24 Doug D.

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:29 PM

Well said Thomas. :waytogo:

#25 Garfield

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 05:56 PM

+1 to Thomas' post - Plenty of food for thought for anyone that hasn't already been through their own personal "telescope evolution".






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