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Most Impressive Object Seen?

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#51 GOLGO13

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 11:37 PM

I had seen Saturn many times through my own 10" scope, but the time I climbed an 8 foot ladder at a star party to look at it through the eyepiece of a 20" Dob.....duuuuuude.


Yeah...I had a similar experience with a 30 inch dob on Saturn. So many moons visible that night.

I really liked the Veil Nebula in my friend's 16 dob in a dark sky with an oxygen III filter. Just a weave strands throughout the eyepiece.

I still find the moon to be just magical. My little 80mm apo does a great job on it.

#52 OneGear

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 12:31 AM

Venus transiting the Sun. The far end of a parking lot projected with my binoculars against a piece of paper I held up. A truck driver walking from his truck (parked even farther from the door than me) walked by, watched for a few minutes, then said he watched it once using a friend's welding mask many, many years ago. I felt a little more human.

Truly cool being able to demonstrate to myself that there are planets that revolve around the Sun inside our own orbit.

That and seeing Uranus one very cold winter night. My beer kept freezing, the eyepieces of my binoculars kept frosting over from the water vapor given off by my eyes, but I saw that smoky, soft orb for myself. So not a star.

#53 Maverick199

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 12:38 AM

The most impressive are the views which are available in all their splendour and that would be Saturn, Moon, Jupiter, Double cluster, M 42, Omega Centauri, Butterfly cluster etc., These objects can never be overlooked and I bet whenever these objects are available, everytime we take our scopes out, we invariably catch a glimpse if not more.

#54 Astrodj

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 02:32 AM

The clear night sky at 16,000 feet in the Kun Lun, Pamir, and Karakorm ranges of western China. It holds yor attention without searching for anything else. Eventually, you begin to look at the Milky Way...

Dark skies.

Jack


Wow! I can't even imagine. Reminds me of some of the ancient Chinese poetry translations in Burnham's concerning the Great River.



Most Impressive Object Seen?

Naked eye for me as well. In my case it was seeing Barnard's Loop (the brighter part) from New Mexico at 7200'. It was so amazing because at the time I didn't know that was possible, yet there it was!

Second best for me was the first time I saw the winter Milky Way (northern hemisphere) from horizon to horizon, as bright as I had ever seen the summer Milky Way previously. That was also nearly unbelievable to behold. That event took place in extreme southeastern Oklahoma.

#55 Gert K A

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 03:32 AM

One summer night in the desert of Jordan
the sky appeared so densely populated that it was hard to make heads or tail of it.

It was absolutely breathtaking.

#56 REC

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 09:31 AM

Same exact items. Solar eclipse just takes your breath away. Also in most cases you are with other fellow astronomers, hobby and the emotions run the full gammit.

Really looking forward to this years Super Comet and hope it performs like they are predicting.

2017 for the next total eclipse here in the US:)

#57 hbanich

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 04:25 PM

A total solar eclipse. In a class by itself and I think is impressive to nearly everyone who see one. The first and so far only total solar eclipse I’ve seen was in in 1979 with my now former spouse. I’d shown her the Moon, Saturn, M42, all the most wonderful things in the sky through my scope and she was as thoroughly unimpressed as anyone I’ve seen. The eclipse knocked her socks off though – stunned her to silence while I couldn’t stop talking!

#58 Dave Chapman

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 05:41 PM

Hands down, Comet Hyakutake on the night of its closest approach March 24/25 1997, seen from a dark location in rural Nova Scotia. Beautiful cyanogen-green coma, and a looong tail stretching across the sky so far you had to turn your head to take it all in. An amazing, once-in-a-lifetime experience. No telescopes involved!

Dave

#59 geekgroupie

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 08:55 PM

Saturn is always the show stopper, IMO.. especially when seen through someone's HUGE dob at a star party... I could see the shadows of the rings. On my own scope I luv to view Jupiters moons and I like to see Pleiades... amazing, there are so, so many stars.

#60 MawkHawk

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 09:41 AM

Hands down, Comet Hyakutake on the night of its closest approach March 24/25 1997, seen from a dark location in rural Nova Scotia. Beautiful cyanogen-green coma, and a looong tail stretching across the sky so far you had to turn your head to take it all in. An amazing, once-in-a-lifetime experience. No telescopes involved!

Dave


Yep. I agree 100%. Hale-Bopp was amazing as well. I'd say that my top 3 sights ever were Hyakutake, Hale-Bopp, and Shoemaker-Levy crashing in Jupiter. (All in the 90's...weird...)

Oh, and scopes used were my trusty RV-6 and my homemade 10" dob.

#61 REC

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 01:37 PM

Yeah, in a short span of a few years...that was pretty exciting times back then.:)

#62 acochran

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 01:54 PM

Last Jan with my 16" Lightbridge I saw several pairs of objects in one FOV for the first time. So that was pretty exciting. Cluster M35 and the cluster right next to it. M81-82, and a pair of Galaxies in Leo, M96-97 I think. M42 tops all though.

#63 tezster

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 02:08 PM

No optics required!

For me, the most impressive 'object' is our own Milky Way Galaxy. From Australia, when Sagittarius is passing through the zenith, I lay back and just stared into the 180 degree 'eyepiece' view of an edge-on galaxy filling the field of view, exhibiting intricate detail in the dust lane, numerous star clouds, star-forming regions, stellar associations and clusters.

All with the unaided eye.


I echo this sentiment! My most memorable view of the night sky remains the Milky Way during a camping trip to Mt. Kaputar while visiting Australia.






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