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UHC-S FIlter

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#1 Pistorbanic

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 08:27 PM

I just bought a UHC-S filter and used it for about ten minutes before the clouds moved in. I looked at Orion and was disappointed. It looked better without the filter. Orion is an emission nebula right? And I believe I read that this filter is good for emission nebula.
The sky conditions were not that good...
Just wondering what anyone else thinks.
Thanks

#2 JIMZ7

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 08:39 PM

You probably had the same sky as I had in SE Michigan the other night. Orion Nebula just looked weak--about what I would see with a 4" refractor. If you had bad skies your filter would not work good. It was because of the high cirrus ice clouds just before the thicker clouds moved in. Try again when you have a better clear night.

Jim :dob:

#3 desertlens

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 08:44 PM

The UHC-S has a wider passband than most other filters designated UHC. As a result, the impact will be less dramatic. I find the UHC-S to be most useful at smaller apertures. All of these filters will help reveal nebula detail, given full dark adaptation, but I often find that the best view is unfiltered. I recommend a combination of both.

#4 Lane

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 09:37 PM

The UHC-S is much more like a broadband filter than a UHC filter. It is a lot like the Lumicon Deep Sky filter but better in my opinion. Best improvement in the Orion Nebula will be with a true UHC or an OIII filter. I suggest the Lumicon brand for both of those.

#5 Scanning4Comets

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 07:21 PM

Totally true what others have said. The Baader UHC-S is more like a broadband filter like the Lumicon Deep sky, etc. Best views I have had of M-42 were with an Orion Ultrablock, Lumicon O-III, or Lumicon UHC filter, in dark skies. Some think these filters are just for light polluted skies, but this is incorrect, as they also do wonders on many targets in darker skies.

Using the Orion Ultrablock and 22mm Vixen LVW on M-42 at the dark site I go to is breathtaking!

Cheers,

#6 achronut

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 10:55 AM

One good thing I know about the UHC-S filter is that it makes a good imaging filter for emission nebulae. Visually, the Celestron OIII does a far better job for the price. This is a single 6min exposure of the Monkeyhead at ISO1600, 350D. No calibration done.

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#7 Scanning4Comets

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 03:43 PM

Totally true above. I never knew about the "Monkeyhead" nebula before !!! What would be the best way to see it visually? What I mean by that is which filter? O-III or Ultrablock?

It's quite large in size, so I could maybe use my O-III and my 38mm Orion Q70 to see it!

Cheers,

#8 achronut

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 12:34 AM

It's quite dim. Your 10" reflector and 38mm + Ultrablock should do fine.

#9 David Knisely

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 05:18 AM

Totally true above. I never knew about the "Monkeyhead" nebula before !!! What would be the best way to see it visually? What I mean by that is which filter? O-III or Ultrablock?

It's quite large in size, so I could maybe use my O-III and my 38mm Orion Q70 to see it!

Cheers,


The "monkey head" nebula is in Orion (NGC 2174), and is helped by both narrow-band and OIII line nebula filters. From my survey using the Lumicon line of filters:

NGC 2174 (diffuse nebula in northern Orion)
(10 inch f/5.6, 52x, 71x).
DEEP-SKY: (2) very faint glow around a single star with hints of detail (much easier to see than without a filter).
UHC: (4) Large increase in contrast over Deep-Sky filter, showing a large circular area of haze with vague irregular interior dark detail.
OIII: (4) Dimmer than in UHC, but has more contrast, showing some dim lane-like structure.
H-BETA: (0) Dims the nebula almost to extinction, showing less than the Deep-Sky.
RECOMMENDATION FOR NGC 2174: UHC/OIII (near tie) (H-Beta NOT recommended).

Clear skies to you.






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