Jump to content


Photo

NGC 1535 in Eridanus

  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 stevecoe

stevecoe

    "Astronomical Tourist"

  • *****
  • Posts: 4226
  • Joined: 24 Apr 2004
  • Loc: Arizona, USA

Posted 16 February 2013 - 12:59 AM

Howdy all;

Last time out under dark skies I spent some time with this planetary and here are my notes:

NGC 1535 16" f/4.5 Antennas site Seeing and Transparency=6 out of 10. 14mm UWA eyepiece bright, pretty large and round. The central star is seen 100% of the time. Averted vision makes it larger. The color of this planetary is light blue-green. 8.8mm eyepiece shows 3 levels of brightness with the central star more prominent at higher power. Now the nebula is very little elongated, about 1.2X1.

Enjoy;
Steve Coe

Attached Files



#2 City Kid

City Kid

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2329
  • Joined: 06 May 2009
  • Loc: Northern Indiana

Posted 16 February 2013 - 11:57 AM

I observed NGC 1535 with my 10" reflector from my very light polluted backyard. I viewed it at 92x and 150x. I was unable to detect color in it but I seem to have trouble detecting color in a lot of objects that others see color in. At 150x I was able to detect two levels of brightness. I never did feel I could positively say I saw the central star. I felt I was seeing hints of a star like core but not enough to say I was sure.

#3 drbyyz

drbyyz

    Ranger 4

  • **---
  • Posts: 395
  • Joined: 04 Nov 2012

Posted 16 February 2013 - 12:17 PM

At 100x I noted that the central star was somewhat visible with averted vision. I described it as having a bright core that slowly fades towards the outer edges of a well defined circular shape. Hint of blue.

Nice sketch! This is on my list of objects to sketch but I haven't gotten to it yet.

#4 stevecoe

stevecoe

    "Astronomical Tourist"

  • *****
  • Posts: 4226
  • Joined: 24 Apr 2004
  • Loc: Arizona, USA

Posted 16 February 2013 - 08:41 PM

City Kid, you know from hanging out on CN for a while that a trip to darker skies will provide you with lots more detail in all you observe. I also understand that is difficult for some folks to do. Here's hoping you get the chance to view from a darker location in the future.

drbyyz, I hope that you make time to do some more drawings, it really has helped me see more detail over the years. Lots of folks who read the articles posted here say that they get more from the drawings than from images. I think that both can provide some input to prepare for a night at the scope.

Clear skies to us all;
Steve Coe

#5 Vince Tramazzo

Vince Tramazzo

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 226
  • Joined: 21 Aug 2004
  • Loc: North of Tucson, AZ.

Posted 16 February 2013 - 09:38 PM

I observed NGC 1535 ( Cleopatra's Eye ) a few nights ago. I've been working on O'Meara's Hidden Trasures list, off and on for the last few years.( HT#24) From the side of my house 25 miles north of Tucson, the NELM is 5.5 at the zenith. I used my C6 SCT, star hopping. It's quite small, but bright. Looked patchy with variable brightness, across the object. My best view was with the 11mm Nagler type6.
( 136X ) I forgot to try a UHC or OIII filter. Darn! A pretty interesting object for a 6" scope!

#6 Feidb

Feidb

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1684
  • Joined: 09 Oct 2009
  • Loc: Nevada

Posted 16 February 2013 - 10:47 PM

I saw it as a nice blue round ball. I didn't note any distinctive features at the time (2004) and my O-III filter didn't help either. Magnification was 70X through a 16-inch f/6.4. Wasn't the best seeing conditions. I'll have to revisit it for a closer look.

#7 JakeSaloranta

JakeSaloranta

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1006
  • Joined: 18 Sep 2008
  • Loc: Finlandia

Posted 18 February 2013 - 04:22 AM

4.7" Sky-Watcher

Object: NGC 1535
Obs. place: Boca Tauce, Tenerife, Spain (2034 meters / 6673 feet)
Date: 23./24.11.2011
NE Lim.mag: 7.1m (zenith)
SQM-L: 21.22 (zenith)
Background sky: 7 (good)
Seeing: 7 (good)
Transparency: 7 (good)
Weather: +6.2 - 0.2°C, humidity 15-41%, clear

Description: @ 360x (7') Very bright, round planetary nebula with a ring structure. Inner ring appears mottled and has at least two brightenings visible in the NE and SW. The 13th magnitude central star is fleeting at best and seems to be easily lost in the inner ring. Slightly bluish in color with low power.

#8 HellsKitchen

HellsKitchen

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1132
  • Joined: 05 Sep 2008
  • Loc: Melbourne Australia

Posted 18 February 2013 - 10:39 AM

I saw it as a nice blue round ball. I didn't note any distinctive features at the time (2004) and my O-III filter didn't help either. Magnification was 70X through a 16-inch f/6.4. Wasn't the best seeing conditions. I'll have to revisit it for a closer look.


You'll need 3-5x that magnification to get the best out of most planetaries, especially bright compact ones like NGC 1535. Using your 16" at just 70x, you are not even beginning to realise the real potential of your scope.

#9 Feidb

Feidb

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1684
  • Joined: 09 Oct 2009
  • Loc: Nevada

Posted 18 February 2013 - 12:12 PM

Obviously, 220X or so would have been much better but as I said, seeing conditions were not good enough as I often find. Maybe I can try something higher next time. 70X is way too low to see any detail but that was my scanning EP at the time and I wasn't pushing because of the sky that night. However, it sure was pretty with that blue color.

#10 eps0mu0

eps0mu0

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 98
  • Joined: 16 Jan 2006
  • Loc: San Francisco, CA

Posted 18 February 2013 - 09:29 PM

I observed NGC1535 for the first time about a month ago, on 1/3/2013. It is mentioned in Sue French's Deep Sky Wonders, Stephen O'Meara's Hidden Treasures, and Martin Griffith's Planetary Nebulae. All concur in that it is an easy object to find, but none state that seeing any detail is easy. In his compendium on planetary nebula observations, Rainer Topler states detail is obvious in a 14" scope at 480x, and use of an OIII filter improves detail in the interior portion of the nebula.
I observed it at 9:30pm PST through my C6. It was low above the SSW horizon, strongly affected by light pollution, yet it was easy to find, even by star-hopping. It was obviously non-stellar at nominal 60x, but fairly small. At a nominal 150x magnification, I thought I saw some condensation (i.e. brightening) towards the center, but this may have been due to the presence of the central star. I was not able to discern the star.
This object will definitely be worth a second look (next year... it is too low in the sky for me now).

#11 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 34954
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 19 February 2013 - 03:02 AM

NGC 1535 is an excellent planetary nebula. I've had some very good views of it from Florida, New Mexico, and Bolivia.

Dave Mitsky

#12 george golitzin

george golitzin

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1683
  • Joined: 24 Feb 2006

Posted 19 February 2013 - 11:27 PM

Thanks for posting Steve. This is now one of my favorite planetaries. Here are my notes from January 2011:

ngc 1535; 16-inch f/5, from home (LM 5)

!!! PN ERI, a first class object; very bright, obvious, and round in 20mm (100x). Outer halo suggested in 13mm (150x): this is very faint, slightly oval. In the 7mm (285x) the central star is visible, the outer halo improves, and annularity (a central darkening) takes shape, making a 3-layered bullseye. The size is about 40". Adding the OIII to the 7mm, the annularity is obvious, the tenuous outer halo is clear and slighly oval. The central darkening is lost in the 13mm + OIII.

Gosh, I should have another peek at it while still in season!

-Geo.

#13 nytecam

nytecam

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11398
  • Joined: 20 Aug 2005
  • Loc: London UK

Posted 20 February 2013 - 05:47 AM

I targetted NGC 1535 [below] last night after search of Comet C/2012 K5 Linear a little further south - both very low in sky from London and bright gibbous moon high above :o NGC 1535 is described as "Eskimo-like" in form [Wikipedia] which is a fair description :grin:

In the brief session also managed M42/Trapezium, Horsehead and M1 Crab SNR - latter 2.5 deg from the gibbous moon but it's there if flooded by moonlight ;)

Attached Files



#14 stevecoe

stevecoe

    "Astronomical Tourist"

  • *****
  • Posts: 4226
  • Joined: 24 Apr 2004
  • Loc: Arizona, USA

Posted 20 February 2013 - 05:42 PM

Nytecam;

This is a excellent representation of what it looks like.

Well done;
Steve Coe






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics