Jump to content


Photo

HD Video Image Intensified Sky Pans at 2X

  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 jdbastro

jdbastro

    Messenger

  • *****
  • Posts: 475
  • Joined: 18 Aug 2007
  • Loc: W. Coast

Posted 16 February 2013 - 03:28 AM

Last weekend from Mount Pinos, Calif, I took a few short videos while panning the sky and horizon in the subfreezing temps. Used a Gen 3 thin film intensifier in a Micro Monocular.

1) Orion, Canis Major and snowy Pine Tree Horizon
2) Orion, Taurus, Pleiades & snowy forest

When viewing, please use the 1080P setting for best quality. The video shows pretty much the same image that one sees when viewing with the naked eye thru the intensifier.
Enjoy.

#2 nytecam

nytecam

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11462
  • Joined: 20 Aug 2005
  • Loc: London UK

Posted 16 February 2013 - 04:07 AM

Nice work - video, for me, best at standard res;-)

#3 PEterW

PEterW

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 770
  • Joined: 02 Jan 2006
  • Loc: SW London, UK

Posted 16 February 2013 - 04:51 AM

Filtered or plain view? Nice location, hasn't realised it was so free covered.

Cheers

Peter

#4 jdbastro

jdbastro

    Messenger

  • *****
  • Posts: 475
  • Joined: 18 Aug 2007
  • Loc: W. Coast

Posted 16 February 2013 - 08:03 PM

Filtered or plain view? Nice location, hasn't realised it was so free covered.

Cheers

Peter


No filter was used. The sky was very dark and transparency was excellent. 'free covered'? You mean 'tree covered' or actually tree surrounded, right?

-J

#5 PEterW

PEterW

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 770
  • Joined: 02 Jan 2006
  • Loc: SW London, UK

Posted 17 February 2013 - 03:00 AM

Yes, good old phone auto"correct" again! How do the different widths of h alpha filters behave under light pollution?

PeterW

#6 jdbastro

jdbastro

    Messenger

  • *****
  • Posts: 475
  • Joined: 18 Aug 2007
  • Loc: W. Coast

Posted 18 February 2013 - 01:02 AM

Yes, good old phone auto"correct" again! How do the different widths of h alpha filters behave under light pollution?

PeterW


I have used 12nm and 7nm H-alpha filters. Under severe light pollution, the 7nm cuts out more light pollution than the 12nm and gives slightly higher contrast when using faster optics - faster than f2. When I use my telescopes (f > f7), I prefer the 12nm filter.
-J






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics