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If a meteor falls in the ocean?

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#1 Ira

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 11:07 PM

If the Russian meteor had fallen in the ocean would it have been detected? Since 70% of the earth's surface is covered by oceans, perhaps large meteors hit the earth alot more often that we realize.

/Ira

#2 Ebyl

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 11:35 PM

Infrasound sensors would be able to detect it at long distances into the kiloton range. It's global for the megaton range. When at least two sensors are able to detect it, they can calculate the location.

Edit - Sorry, meant to add that it would really depend on what kind of coverage they've got for infrasound detectors. IMS has a bunch of stations around the world, and there are of course others.

Here is the IMS map (I think).

http://www.bgr.bund....ng?__blob=no...

And of course there are other ways to detect the meteors.

#3 wirenut

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 12:37 PM

yes we have satelites that watch for large explosions/blast from nukes. they detect other blast/explosions of the same magnatude like meteors too.

#4 Glassthrower

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 02:50 PM

I guess one *could* theoretically retrieve fallen meteorites from the ocean bottom. One could accurately track and plot the impact locations, and get to the site quickly. Then, locate the meteorites using some kind of high-powered, underwater metal-detector, bottom-mapping sonar, etc.

The problem then becomes retrieving the meteorite from the bottom (possibly miles down) and transporting it to the surface. And therein lies the devil in this scenario. While accomplishing this feat would not be impossible with current technologies and engineering, it would be cost-prohibitive. It is far cheaper to retrieve them from dry land as they fall, and they are less altered/damaged than a meteorite recovered from a body of water.

Best regards,

MikeG

#5 Qwickdraw

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 04:09 PM

If a meteor falls in the ocean and nobody was around to hear it, did it really fall?

#6 Mister T

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 04:49 PM

ask a dinosaur :dabomb:

#7 llanitedave

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 10:27 PM

T-Rex was not a nobody.

#8 Mister T

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 07:17 AM

he was just misunderstood






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