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Betelguese looks really red tonight.

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#1 SeptemberEquinox

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 11:28 PM

As i was leaving from work, i looked up and saw a bright red star Betelgeuse. Normally i see it as bright orange, but it looks supa red. Are my eyes so tired, they are seeing stuff or is something going on? I am no where near my telescope, so I won't be able to take a look at Betelgeuse, tonight.

#2 leviathan

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 12:54 AM

Supernova finally ?? :bigshock:

#3 MikeBOKC

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 08:18 AM

I sometimes find the colors of specific stars a bit stronger on nights with good transparency. Betelguese can range from red to orange depending on elevation and what I am looking through to see it.

#4 JayinUT

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 09:09 AM

When the light from the SN that will come from Betelgeuse arrives we will know it. Here is a view from Celestia (fee NASA program) that shows what it may look like.

Posted Image

#5 SeptemberEquinox

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 09:50 AM

I got really excited lol >.<

#6 Jerry-rigged

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 10:19 AM

I was looking at it Monday, and was thinking the same thing. Looks more red than I remember. But then, I am still a noob, and don't spend a lot of time (gasp!) looking at stars.

#7 csrlice12

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 10:31 AM

A selection of other possibilities:

OK class, Remember to remove your filters before packing up your equipment! :lol:

Or, with those bloodshot eyes, everything must look red.... :lol:

Or, if it's a chrismas scope, you can remove the red wrapping paper from the OTA now... :lol:

Or, how do you not know it wasn't an airplane trying to shine a laser down your scope?? :question:

Or, We're fixing to be attaked by a giant white space pie.... :help:

#8 nirvanix

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 10:52 AM

High transparency really lets the stars show their true colors. If you look at star clusters on nights of excellent transparency you'll be surprised to find some colored stars in there where normally they are whitish.

#9 Tony Flanders

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 11:04 AM

For what it's worth, like most if not all red supergiants, Betelgeuse is a long-period variable. And its color varies together with its magnitude.

However, I'm betting on atmospheric conditions.

#10 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 11:31 AM

The color change as Betelgeuse varies (over a period of months to years, mainly) is probably too small to detect visually. I find that for such reddish stars, atmospheric conditions have to be quite bad, or the star rather low, in order to effect a notable further reddening. I can't ever recall conditions which made a star bluer; reddening is virtually the only color change one might experience, except, I suppose under the right type of volcanic ash/particulates that I've read about.

For me, far more effective in the altering of perceived color purity is whether I'm dark adapted or not. As dark adaption proceeds, star colors become paler.

Additionally, when I see the redder stars in deep twilight, where the blue of the sky is still perceptible, they seem to be more intensely hued, presumably due to the effect of the complementary colors, blue and orange.

#11 ThreeD

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 01:26 PM

Perhaps you are wearing rose colored glasses? Have things generally been looking up these days?

#12 uniondrone

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 01:44 PM

Hi Jay,

That's a nice image! It's been a while since I've fooled around with Celestia. Did you do this by setting the time forward, or by using some other function?

#13 Dennis_S253

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 08:36 PM

I thought I read it could happen in our life time? Maybe they meant our grand kids life time. I don't think anyone knows. It could happen tonight.

#14 leviathan

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 01:39 AM

Who knows, maybe it has exploded several centuries ago and light from it hasn't yet reached us.

#15 GeneT

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 11:57 AM

Maybe particulants in the atmosphere?

#16 bryguy27007

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 12:23 PM

Perhaps you are wearing rose colored glasses? Have things generally been looking up these days?


:lol:
Good one.

#17 Footbag

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 09:23 AM

I'm reluctant to belive the supernova is beginning, but I did walk outside the other night and say the same exact thing.

It really did look redder the usual.

#18 chrisg

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 09:28 AM

Is there an astronomical organization that would track this sort of thing? I also noticed that Betelgeuse looks more red than I recall.

#19 MikeBOKC

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 05:24 PM

Yes IAU maintains a central reporting station for all supernovae, comets, etc. It is the go to source and the place both amateurs and professionals report new discoveries.

#20 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 06:26 PM

Many amateurs can easily measure the B-V color index, which can be compared with older measures.

#21 SeptemberEquinox

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 06:30 PM

If something goes off, please remember I posted this first on cloudynights lol

#22 smallscopefanLeo

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 10:51 PM

It looked about the same to me tonight with binoculars and via naked eye. But then my color detecting acuity is probably not my strongest of suits!:shrug:

Lots of sucker holes ... And frustratingly decent seeing between them, too! If I didn't have a paper to type right now I'd be out there hunting for good views through them. :p

#23 WhitenerJ

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 10:01 PM

I hope Betelgeuse doesn't go SN anytime soon. It would ruin my Astrophotography for a long time!!!

Jason

#24 smallscopefanLeo

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 11:18 PM

I hope Betelgeuse doesn't go SN anytime soon. It would ruin my Astrophotography for a long time!!!

Jason

It is amazing to me that humans have not observed (not on record anyhow) any supernovas in the Milky Way since Kepler's SN over 400 years ago..

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SN_1604
(over three weeks of daytime visibility!)

(though I realize that a span of 400-500 years is but a blip on the radar screen of time in our Universe, relatively speaking)


Some cool reading here,
http://www.hacastron...intro_to_sn.htm
( http://www.hacastronomy.com/sn/ )

Hm, on a side note (these topics sometimes get my mind racing :grin:), anyone else here wonder just what sort of stunning Planetary Nebula our beloved Sol might produce in several billion years time, and what distant life forms might perchance observe it?:question: (Perhaps some of our ultra distant descendants might view it from afar, with wistful remembering gazes, or is that just ego talking? :lol:)

#25 JayinUT

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 12:19 AM

Personally I don't think 400 or 500 years of not seeing a SN on earth is a big deal. We know of a more recent SN, G1.9+0.3 thanks to Chandra. The SN was obscured by dust near the core. This SN is about 150 years old, making it the youngest SNR in the Milky Way. Chandra has some great images of this SN at this link

On another note this is a fun artist rendering of the Milky Way showing the most recent SN's and SNR at this link.

There is a very high and condense number of large stars in the core region. Undoubtfully there have been SN's there and on the opposite side of the galaxy that we simply cannot see. I would also think that before Betelgeuse goes SN, we will probably see a Type Ia (White Dwarf) SN since many of those are still unknown.






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