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UK Questar 3.5 review

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#1 Michael Lomb

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 04:25 AM

This may be a new post, or I simply have not seen it before, one person's review of the Questar 3.5.
http://scopeviews.co.uk/Questar35.htm

#2 coz

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 07:55 AM

Thanks for the link. Nice write up.

#3 justfred

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 05:44 PM

I'd like to chime in with my thanks also, Michael. A very well balanced article. Didn't try to make it anything other than what it is - a great, easy to use scope that's not that far away price-wise from other premium scopes these days. Not because its dropping in price, but because the other premium scopes rising in cost much faster. Nothing else offers the complete package in a small carry-on case. Thanks. Fred

#4 Michael Lomb

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 03:10 AM

The other telescope reviews on this site are worth reading. What was particularly interesting was the limitation of large aperture telescopes in a climate that does not support their optics. In my climate, 35 degrees south  in northern New Zealand, cloud and poor seeing can handicap the full potential of even a 3.5 Questar. Sometimes  less can be more useful.

http://www.scopeview...ics12inchDK.htm

#5 justfred

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 11:30 PM

Michael,

I agree. Here at 33 degrees North we have the same issues. The Southeastern US seems more tropical than subtropical in the summer especially. I have read where some feel strongly that the larger apertures are still the best regardless of how light polluted or gooey the atmosphere is. My experience has been that the slower Questar optics seem to eke out the best the sky has to offer on those less than ideal nights. Again, there's no magic here. Excellent slow optics are simply more forgiving.

Fred






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