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some small PNe

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#1 nytecam

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 10:25 AM

Rare clear skies at dusk on Wednesday and with a list of a dozen PNe from Megastar I managed 5 Pne, GC M79 very low in Lepus and TTau/NGC1555 eg Hinds Var Neb before haze and drifting cloud ended the one-hour session before moonrise. Poor eyes 'n skies precluded eyeballing but I got some snaps below as maybe finder charts - are any on your observing list :question:

IC 2003 Per
IC 351 Per
IC 418 Lepus,
NGC 1535 Eri = Cleopatra,
NGC 1514 Tau; older image,
T Tau/NGC 1555 Hinds Var Neb; older image,



#2 City Kid

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 07:44 AM

IC 2003 and IC 351 are both on my list of objects I'm wanting to observe. The others I've already picked off but now that I have a larger scope I want to view them again also.

#3 sgottlieb

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 04:54 PM

Here's my last observation of IC 2003 --

18" (2/4/08): easily swept up unfiltered at 115x as a vey small, blue-grey disc forming a close "double" with a mag 13.5 star just 18" SW. At 220x the star is well separated and the planetary appears a bit irregular with an occasional sparkle. Increasing the magnification to 325x, the appearance is definitely asymmetric with a fainter NW quadrant and an intermittent stellaring (superimposed star, knot, or the central star) to the SE of the geometric center. At 450x, the dimmer quadrant on the NW side appears to bulge out slightly and the brighter region, centered to the SE, extends in an arc from the NE to the SW. An occasional stellar sparkle was clearly visible, though it was difficult to pinpoint the location.

#4 nytecam

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 04:57 AM

Great observation and report Steve through increasing magnification of IC 2003 - well done :bow:

Last night clearer than Feb 27 for shot of another PN on my list in very faint NGC 2242 in Auriga [below]- perhaps one of my deeper shots due to proximity to zenith in early evening.

Megastar show an OC IC 2168 a few arc-minutes SW of PN but I can find nothing there in my pic? Sloan DSS shows some faint gxys [ticks] in PN field and magificent gxy cluster a little NE in Lynx around NGC 2340 to come :grin:

I suspect the apparent irregular shaped edge to N2242 is due to excessive processing on my part as subsequent Google search shows it's a classic smooth circular form. ;)

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#5 Kraus

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 08:24 PM


Those planetaries are just like the best to see. Neat to find, neat to magnify. Who has seen the Raspberry? Check Steve O'Meara's Astronomy column last Spring. At high magnification, I saw the spirograph.

#6 nytecam

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 04:52 AM

Those planetaries are just like the best to see. Neat to find, neat to magnify. Who has seen the Raspberry? Check Steve O'Meara's Astronomy column last Spring. At high magnification, I saw the spirograph.

Thanks for your interest and enjoy the PNe views :grin:

Here's NGC 2022 in the Head of Orion from the same night :grin:

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#7 BillFerris

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 05:02 PM

A nice collection of Planetaries. NGC 1514 presented some fine detail in my 18-inch: I initially mistook this large planetary as fog on the eyepiece producing a hazy glow around a bright star. But while sweeping the area, I realized that bright star was the only one encased in haze. NGC 1514 covers a 3' by 2'.5 area. At its heart is the blue tinged 9.4 magnitude central star. The nebulosity features a bright outer ring. After a few minutes observation, averted vision reveals striations within the nebula, and the east and west edges appear brighter than the surrounding ring. Slipping an OIII filter into position teases very faint outer lobes into view. These appeared along the east and west edges of the planetary nebula, and are confirmed by long exposure astrophotos and CCD images.

Bill in Flag






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