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"Frosty Leo"

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#1 PeterDob

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 01:13 PM

Finally I found the little rascal! Actually, I thought it'd be a bit bigger and as I usually search at 85x I completely overlooked it at first. But here it is. Unfortunately I'm blocked at 206x for the moment because I cut my truss poles in order to be able to use my binoviewer without OCA. And that's not really enough for Frosty Leo. I could only see that it's a tiny "bar" with the lower part being slightly brighter. Well... I hope you like my impression...

Peter

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#2 Andrev

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 01:52 PM

Peter.

Nice. But what is this ??? An NGC object ? Never heard about it.

Andre.

#3 PeterDob

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 02:28 PM

Its official designation is IRAS 09371+1212 since it was discovered by IRAS in 1987. Yet it's quite bright (mag 11 for a tiny surface) so already observable in modest scopes. The only problem is its minuscule size, which had me fooled for a while too...

Peter

#4 JeanB

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 02:41 PM

Well a lot of valuable time spent finding and sketching this tiny fellow!

Great job.

Jean

#5 niteskystargazer

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 04:52 PM

Peter,

Nice Sketch :).

CS,KLU,

:thanx:,

Tom

#6 Chopin

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 07:53 PM

Nice detective work, and a great sketch.

#7 Aquarellia

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 11:56 PM

Great Peter, the quantity of nebulae you are able to sketch must be very high ! Your result is very interesting.

#8 starquake

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 05:30 AM

Wow, thanks a lot for sharing this hidden treasure, I'll try to find it with my 12" scope, I guess this is one of those "I should be at the right place, but there's that star that doesn't match with the map" objects. :)

I've found that its coordinates are RA 9h 39m 53s and Dec +11° 58' 52", so I guess the designation refers to the J2000.0 epoch.

#9 PeterDob

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 08:37 AM

Thanks a lot guys! :D

Yes, you're right, Ferenc. I have to say that I wad a bit disappointed because its stated size (Wikipedia) made me believe it would be something like a reasonable planetary. Until I saw that little "star" that wasn't quite a "star". :D

Peter

#10 frank5817

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 09:51 AM

Peter,

Very impressive capture.

Frank :)

#11 Jef De Wit

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 10:37 AM

Why "Frosty"?

#12 PeterDob

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 01:24 AM

Many thanks, Frank!

@Jef: This is what Wikipedia says:

"Forveille et al. 1987 dubbed IRAS 09371+1212 as the "Frosty Leo Nebula" because of their interpretation of the object's extremely unusual far infrared spectrum that water is largely depleted in its gaseous state by ice condensation into grains and for its location in the Leo constellation."

With courtesy to my Italian astronomy friends, here's a map. Happy hunting!

Peter

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#13 kenrenard

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 10:59 AM

I learned something new today. Great sketch and good information. Thanks

Ken

#14 Astrojensen

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 11:21 AM

This object is very overlooked. I've been observing it for years with my 63mm Zeiss. It is small, but clearly nonstellar at 120x. 191x shows a small, elongated glow, very much like in Peter's fine sketch.


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#15 PeterDob

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 01:32 PM

Many thanks, Ken and Thomas! I didn't see a lot of "glow" though, but rather a slightly elongated and fuzzy star. But I agree completely. It's a very interesting object which is sadly overlooked. I hope that my post may change that...

Ciao!

Peter

#16 kenrenard

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 01:48 PM

Peter,
I end up learning more in the Sketching Forums than anywhere else. As a Novice you folks here are very skilled observers as well as artists. Clear Skies

Ken

#17 starquake

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 07:31 PM

Finally I was able to catch this little gem this evening! :D The seeing was quite bad, but for some moments it became excellent, and those moments were giving me some view I've never expected, I was able to see the dark band that divides the two halves of this protoplanetary nebula!! I never check these objects on images before I give them a go, to avoid tricking my brain, so I'm absolutely sure that I've seen the dark band - although absolutely not during the whole observation.

My sketch done at 469x with my 12" dob is attached to this post. FoV is 7', SQM: 21.16 MPSAS, 7°C.

Edit.. oops, I didn't wanted to hijack the thread, so I've removed the attachment because it was automatically displayed in the post, so here's the link instead: this is it

#18 PeterDob

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 04:20 AM

Don't worry about hijacking the thread, Ferenc! I appreciate your post a lot! Your sketch is superb and I wish I could've used the same mag as you because the division was invisible to me. Perhaps on a night with better seeing... My compliments! :D

Peter

#19 starquake

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 08:30 AM

Thank you, and thanks again for drawing my attention to this object. At 250x I could not see the dark band either, but sometimes magnification does miracles. I've tried everything: 71x, 167x, 250x, 300x, 375x, 469x, 600x, but under 375x details were missing, 600x was hopeless because of the seeing and somehow - although the same series of eyepieces - 469x was easier to focus than 375x.

My seeing was terrible too, and to tell the truth, most of the time the picture was blurred, but when we sketch, we're forced to look at an object for a longer time, and that might bring us some moments of rock solid seeing.

And another great benefit of high magnification sketching is that you don't have to mess too much with plotting the field stars. :D

#20 PeterDob

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 10:26 AM

Hahaha... :D Very true! Amen! ;)

Peter

#21 ericj

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 09:52 AM

Hi Peter,

Really nice deep-sky sketch, thanks for posting it. I have not heard of this object before but it looks like an interesting DSO.

I noticed that you have a binoviewer. Have you used it while observing deep-sky objects? I have tried a binoviewer on some of the brighter DSO's and the veiw can be interesting.

Some year years ago I attended the Texas Star Party and one fellow brought a home-made 20" f/4.5 binocular telescope. The views of the DSO's was amazing, and I felt I was looking at photo's of the DSO's.

Best,

Eric Jamison

#22 PeterDob

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 05:03 PM

It's a very interesting object indeed, but actually it requires higher mags than the 206x which I'm limited to for the moment.

I use the Siebert 40mm VP Echelon 2" binoviewer and without OCA (so with shortened truss poles). This binoviewer gives near to equal monocular light throughput. But as always it's a kind of compromise. For a detailed review I'd like to refer to the one I recently wrote for the Cloudynights' review section. Sorry but I'm writing this from my mobile and it's too complicated to add a link here. But I'm sure you'll easily find it. :D

Peter






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