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Tips for the public on viewing

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#1 Doc Willie

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 07:29 PM

I made this slide in my "Toninght's Sky" for public presentations.
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HOW TO LOOK

Sit

Adjust your head to the eyepiece

Do NOT touch the eyepiece

Use the focuser (with permission)

Spend some time with details and the faint stuff

Use averted vision
--------------------

Anything else I should add?

#2 csrlice12

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 11:30 AM

Don't Spit down the telescope tube.....

For some, (not all), nudging techniques...

#3 Skylook123

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 03:47 PM

Doc, the focuser note is SO important. I tell my audiences that a telescope is a monocle, and everyone has a unique prescription. Luckily, I'm about 20/100 without glasses so if I focus for myself, most folks can deal with it but, after all, that's MY prescription, not theirs, so I try to phrase it so they understand it's an individual characteristic, not a flaw nor a fixed parameter of the scope.

If sittting is not an option, like when I set up my SCT for kids at elementary schools and their parents are along, I remind them that at night, bending over, dizziness or balance can interfere and not to push beyond a comfort level. Especially true for older people when bending over without external visual references; the inner ear can betray them.

#4 kfiscus

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 07:42 PM

I tell people that most glasses wearers find that they have to remove them- but not everyone. THEN I show them the focuser knobs telling them that everyone's eyes are different.

#5 Skylook123

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 11:14 PM

If I use an old Plossl eyepiece, the eye relief allows the glasses wearers the freedom to use them. If I use a Panoptic or Nagler, however, the eye relief is so doggone short that glasses are a tremendous impediment unless their astigmatism is so profound they absolutely must use them. Myself, I need at least 300X to over come my own astigmatism so my normal 115X Panoptic is a challenge on planets and double stars for me, but give gorgeous context.

#6 tezster

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 08:10 AM

As far as viewing comfortably through the EP, I've always worn glases while observing, and I simply tell people they can keep their glasses on if they wish, or take them off, whichever they feel most comfortable with. All EPs I've owned have had 20mm+ of ER :)

#7 Doc Willie

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 08:29 AM

A discussion of whether or not to remove glasses seems a useful addition.

Next slide:

STAR PARTY ETIQUETTE

NO white light

Ask before using or touching a scope

No food or smoking near telescopes

Keep children under control

#8 Footbag

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 05:57 PM

I agree that using the focuser is part of effectively observing an object, but I only mention it to people who seem to have sufficient interest and respect for the equipment.

As for glasses, "Wear them if you need them."






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