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Try this with your Bino Viewer!!

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#1 orion61

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 07:35 PM

Try useing slightly different color filters in your eyepieces, It REALLY makes whatever you are looking at POP out in 3D,
I found out by mistake in the dark when I thought I had the same yellow filters, one was darker and it was a cool experience,
Or try yellow and light green each eye brings out slightly different detail and the image jumps out like crazy,
The people at my last outreach prefer it about 5 to 1.
try it...

#2 Ira

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 07:41 PM

Or else get a pair of those red and blue spectacles.

Cool idea. I'll give it a try.

/Ira

#3 mark8888

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 08:10 PM

Very cool idea, I wish I currently had a scope to try it with.

I'm wondering, as someone who generally doesnt like to use color filters, would one get the same effect with, say, a mild yellow filter in one eyepiece and no filter with the other? That could keep the color close to reality while still getting a little 3D..?

#4 johnnyha

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 08:27 PM

Agreed. I think this is genius, thank you. I've never been into filters but I am VERY into binoviewing and this actually makes a lot of sense... wow. Hmmm. :waytogo:

The possibilities are endless. :bow:

#5 herrointment

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 02:39 AM

Iowa Rocks!

#6 orion61

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 08:24 AM

Let me know if you guys like it as well as I do!!
Genius...no... Accident YES..
But nobody has mentioned it before that I have read, but it is very possible I missed it.. Cool effect..tho
The differences in what each filter brings out in one color and not the other, is similar to using a blink comparator,
Like Clyde Tombaugh used to find Pluto, the image really floats, like you can reach out and touch it!

#7 t.r.

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 08:58 AM

Yep, I would think light blue and light red would be the logical choice here.

#8 REC

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 09:29 AM

So, are you talking about a filter in one eye only or two different colors, like blue in one and say green in the other?

Should be pretty interesting on the Moon.

Bob

#9 jg3

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 03:04 PM

This method has come up before occasionally.

Going so far as orange in one, blue in the other is eye-straining at first, but soon shows features and details in Jupiter (or Saturn or Mars) that I've overlooked with a single or no filter. A single color filter often hides as much as it shows, but a different color on each eye can work around some of that, and deliver more information for the brain to put together.

Filters shift the focus, so a filter in one but none in the other won't generally work.

#10 johnnyha

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 04:12 PM

This has been broached a few times. A few years back the Denk II beamsplitter was deliberately split into red and blue beams (or "warm" and "cool") for just this reason, to get the extra "pop". There is a quote to this effect from Russ, I'll see if I can find it again...

Aha!


"Our beam splitter coating recipe is designed to produce an image that is
ultimately re-combined by the observer's brain to come very close to
containing all of the light that was originally produced by the
telescope. One of the properties of this beam splitter coating is that
Red light with longer wavelengths is transmitted more efficiently than
blue light with shorter wavelengths. So, the right side of the
binoviewer will produce images that are slightly shifted toward the red
since this side is comprised of the light that has been transmitted by
the wall of the beamsplitter. The left side consisting of light
reflected by the beam splitter wall lacks as much red light and actually
contains more blue light. So, the left side may appear brighter or
"whiter" to some observers when the images are examined separately."

It should be noted that this was a few years back and from what I understand, Denk has since gone to beam splitters that are more evenly illuminated - their new one in fact has simply outstanding test results that were just published on the website.

#11 Mark9473

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 04:57 PM

Well I notice the same tonality difference in my MaxBrights but honestly I think it's not an intentional feature.

#12 orion61

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 05:58 PM

This also sounds a bit crazy but a Wide Band LPR filter on Jupiter brings out some added detail, I like to experiment,
A V-block on one side and LPR on the other,
It isn't for everyone, the information your Brain receives is nearly overwhelming at first! At least it is in My tiny Brain.. I takes a couple minutes (seriously) to get things settled down, I would guess this gains me a good extra 20-25% in detail I'd normally miss, by blinking alternate eyes
it makes fine detail jump out..After 45 years behind the eyepiece I'm up for any new tricks I can find or think up.
Please try this if you havent, the worst thing that can come of it is saying to yourself, "I don't like it"
You may find it to be your favorite trick..
I tested it at a sidewalk Star Party and strangers liked better 60% 40%, about the same that they liked bino viewers over all. On the Moon it was hands down for the Bino viewers
especially at high power and shutting the drive off for about 30 seconds.

#13 mikey cee

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 06:16 PM

Yes I too have noticed this effect with my own two eyes at the binoviewer. When looking at a pastel wall in normal incandecent light here at my computer I can see my built in filters at work. The right eye has a noticeably dimmer and warmer hue than my brighter cooler left eye. It does help on Jupiter as dumb as it sounds so there is real tangible truth in this thread. ;) Mike

#14 orion61

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 08:03 PM

Hi Mike, thanks for the input, It is nice to hear someone else has noticed this phenomenom, It does help me see detail
that does not stand out otherwise, especially using the Blink comparison technique.
By the way what kind of viewer do you have?
I only have the simple Arcturus $119.00 ones but after I opened them up and adjusted the prism to get them to merge
they are great! You only need to do one side 2 allen screws, move the prism, in or out/up or down, while looking at an artificial Star, simple job and they have stayed aligned for over a year now. Glad I bought them.
Especially after they changed the eyepiece barrel locks from a single screw that marred the chrome barrels to a self centering Helical grip.
Larry

#15 mikey cee

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 10:47 PM

Me? Why I have a pair of exotic high dollar WO's. They can't get anymore collimated. :grin: Mike

#16 azure1961p

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 12:22 AM

I've always noticed that myself. I'm not sure if a specific eye. Is cool or warm but that the effect is unequal because one eye may be reacting to different lighting than the other and this test shows it? Don't kno if its intrinsic to my eye or brain or merely transient retina thing.

Pete

#17 orion61

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 11:18 AM

My Inexpensive Arcturus viewer was perfectly aligned, Untill I dropped them! AARGG:foreheadslap:

#18 faackanders2

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 12:13 PM

This also sounds a bit crazy but a Wide Band LPR filter on Jupiter brings out some added detail, I like to experiment,
A V-block on one side and LPR on the other,
It isn't for everyone, the information your Brain receives is nearly overwhelming at first! At least it is in My tiny Brain.. I takes a couple minutes (seriously) to get things settled down, I would guess this gains me a good extra 20-25% in detail I'd normally miss, by blinking alternate eyes
it makes fine detail jump out..After 45 years behind the eyepiece I'm up for any new tricks I can find or think up.
Please try this if you havent, the worst thing that can come of it is saying to yourself, "I don't like it"
You may find it to be your favorite trick..
I tested it at a sidewalk Star Party and strangers liked better 60% 40%, about the same that they liked bino viewers over all. On the Moon it was hands down for the Bino viewers
especially at high power and shutting the drive off for about 30 seconds.


oRION SKYGLOW REALLY MAKE JUPITERS BANDS POP OUT!
i OFTEN PUT ONE FILTER IN ONE EYE, OF DIFFERENT FILTERS IN EACH EYE.

#19 orion61

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 03:17 PM

Let us know after you guys(And GALS) try this.
You have nothing to loose! Perhaps a favorite way of viewing.
I though I was the only guy goofy enough to try out an LPR on Jupiter.. seems not. But then again my bubble has always floated a bit Port side of Level... :silly: :looney:

#20 RogueGazer

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 07:18 PM

I have tried this technique in the past with a red and blue filter but my red was a bit too dark even on the moon. This caused my brain to favor the much brighter blue. If I had a lighter red the result probably would have been much better. Trying blue and yellow seemed so so.

#21 orion61

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 08:20 PM

I have noticed that too and I probably should have mentioned it, I like useing 2 shades of yellow/orange but
they have to be fairly close in light transmission for best results. It's not going to be 3D like Avatar but it will add to the experience.

#22 Doc Willie

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Posted 16 March 2013 - 08:31 AM

What about splitting a pair of polarizer filters, putting them in with the polarity at 90 degrees?

#23 thesubwaypusher

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Posted 16 March 2013 - 10:23 PM

Another interesting trick is when you want to directly compare 1.25 eyepieces. You just install each right next to each other!

#24 johnnyha

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 01:14 AM

Another interesting trick is when you want to directly compare 1.25 eyepieces. You just install each right next to each other!


...assuming you have a perfect beamsplitter. ;)

#25 mich_al

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 09:05 AM

Another interesting trick is when you want to directly compare 1.25 eyepieces. You just install each right next to each other!


...assuming you have a perfect beamsplitter. ;)


... and they are parafocal
... and your eyes are equal






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