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Try this with your Bino Viewer!!

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#26 faackanders2

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 01:07 PM

Another interesting trick is when you want to directly compare 1.25 eyepieces. You just install each right next to each other!


...assuming you have a perfect beamsplitter. ;)


... and they are parafocal
... and your eyes are equal


Comparing different eyepieces in binoviewers at he same time would only work is powers were within 10% or both eyes would not merge images. Assuming your eyes can accept that much difference, and the in/out focus is within limits to look through with both eyes. Might be a good way to show different apparent fields of view with at same power (but most individuals probably wouldn't have that type of duplications).

#27 faackanders2

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 01:15 PM

I have tried this technique in the past with a red and blue filter but my red was a bit too dark even on the moon. This caused my brain to favor the much brighter blue. If I had a lighter red the result probably would have been much better. Trying blue and yellow seemed so so.


Noticed Jupiter favored the lighter colors, while the moon favored the darker colors. I have never seen Venus cloud tops, but perhaps I may see something other than phase with light or dark colored filters.

P.S. Televue now has a planet filter, which I have heard keeps red spot red, but makes bands and caps darker brown.
I have used skyglow on Jupiter with great sucess in seeing contrast.

#28 faackanders2

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 01:21 PM

What about splitting a pair of polarizer filters, putting them in with the polarity at 90 degrees?


That would only work with 3D movies. ;)
I believe may become polarized coming through the atmosphere if looking near the horizon.

#29 thesubwaypusher

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 08:43 PM

Another interesting trick is when you want to directly compare 1.25 eyepieces. You just install each right next to each other!


...assuming you have a perfect beamsplitter. ;)


... and they are parafocal
... and your eyes are equal


Comparing different eyepieces in binoviewers at he same time would only work is powers were within 10% or both eyes would not merge images. Assuming your eyes can accept that much difference, and the in/out focus is within limits to look through with both eyes. Might be a good way to show different apparent fields of view with at same power (but most individuals probably wouldn't have that type of duplications).


You guys are so silly! I didn't mean to look through them at the same time! I meant use your right eye to look through one, and then use your right eye to look through the other!

#30 Mark9473

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 03:13 AM

That was pretty obvious to most of us. But you'd still have to switch EP positions because beamsplitters aren't necessarily perfect. In my MaxBrights there's a noticeable colour cast difference between the two sides, for example.

#31 herrointment

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 05:10 PM

I'd cannibalized may filters for various experiments and was left with only blue and light green to try.

No go with that combo for me.






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