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Looking for PANSTARR

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#151 t.r.

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 09:00 AM

Thanks.

#152 DonsDob

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 09:03 AM

Although I saw it briefly (for a minute between clouds) a week ago on 3/19, last night 3/26 was the first really clear western horizon in weeks here in CT. Panstarrs was visible thru my 8x56 from about 19:50 to 20:20. It formed the lower point of a triangle with (I think) delta and epsilon Andromeda.

#153 yashi

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 02:51 PM

thanks erik, i will give it another try as soon as possible.

sadly ive got a lot of "low horizon" clouds recently :/

#154 KennyJ

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 06:10 PM

For some reason it's got to the stage where I'm not sure I even WANT to see this comet now.

To me, it's become a bit like a woman playing a bit TOO hard to get.

Life's too short to waste too much of it chasing something so stubbornly elusive.

If it's going to appear so high in the sky as to become a target TOO easy to see any time soon from our windows or backyard,I'm considering erecting a large canvas sheet or something to block it from view.

Just my way of saying to it " sod you " ! :-)

Kenny

#155 edwincjones

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 06:16 PM

For some reason it's got to the stage where I'm not sure I even WANT to see this comet now.

To me, it's become a bit like a woman playing a bit TOO hard to get.

Life's too short to waste too much of it chasing something so stubbornly elusive.

If it's going to appear so high in the sky as to become a target TOO easy to see any time soon from our windows or backyard,I'm considering erecting a large canvas sheet or something to block it from view.

Just my way of saying to it " sod you " ! :-)

Kenny


oh Kenny,
can you not remember the "thrill of the conquest"?
go for it-she's/it's worth it

edj

#156 hfjacinto

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 08:41 PM

It's dimmed a lot in 2 weeks, it's also not very high. Saw it tonight again but I am not going to try again, it's not that impressive. I used the 15x50mm Canon IS.

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#157 hfjacinto

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 08:41 PM

You can just make it out in the image it in the center. Needed a 15 second exposure to capture it

#158 Mark9473

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 04:59 AM

If it's going to appear so high in the sky as to become a target TOO easy to see any time soon from our windows or backyard,I'm considering erecting a large canvas sheet or something to block it from view.

Just my way of saying to it " sod you " ! :-)

Kenny

Don't worry Kenny, it's getting dimmer every day and I can guarantee it will not ruin your dark adaptation. I don't think you could spot it now without some effort even in binoculars.

#159 Erik Bakker

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 05:26 AM

Yo guys are making this comet far more difficult to observe than it really is.

Last evening from 19.45 - 20.30 , I observed it easily in my 7x42 bino with a starlike nucleus and a beautiful wide dust tail. I glimpsed it with the naked eye. In the 18x70 bino it was a majestic sight. In the 102 f/8 fluorite at 40x, less tail was visible than in either of the binoculars. In the 16"f/5 at 100x in the 20 N T2 it was absolutely superb.

Included is a 1/2 sec handheld(!) picture I made with my Nikon D300 S, 70-200mm VR II Nikkor working at 200mm, f/2.8 and IS on at ISO 1600.

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#160 steve@37n83.9w

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 07:21 AM

Yo guys are making this comet far more difficult to observe than it really is.

Last evening from 19.45 - 20.30 , I observed it easily in my 7x42 bino with a starlike nucleus and a beautiful wide dust tail. I glimpsed it with the naked eye. In the 18x70 bino it was a majestic sight. In the 102 f/8 fluorite at 40x, less tail was visible than in either of the binoculars. In the 16"f/5 at 100x in the 20 N T2 it was absolutely superb.

Included is a 1/2 sec handheld(!) picture I made with my Nikon D300 S, 70-200mm Nikkor working at 200mm, f/2.8 and IS on at ISO 1600.



Erik

I'm sure sky conditions must be a factor in how difficult Panstarr is to find/view. I observed on two occasions and like you thought it very easily found and a beautiful sight. I used my 7x 42EDG and 12x50 SE the first night and my 8x30 Habicht and 18x70 Astroluxe at my other observing session.

It's a shame that many of our forum members haven't managed this one yet due to bad sky/viewing conditions. I love comets and can't wait for ISON, if it's half as good as expected I can't imagine anyone not being able to see it.

Steve

#161 hfjacinto

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 08:26 AM

2 weeks ago the comet was easy. Its not so much any more. Its faint and it never went really high. Overall not as impressed as I thought it would be. I saw it 3 times and I can say that its brightness has decreased by a lot.

#162 Sonomajfk

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 01:39 PM

Steve, I agree, local viewing conditions are the determining factor. Last night, we had very good conditions as a front had just blown through the area. I was able to walk out on our back deck and immediately pick up the comet in 15 x 70's.
Other nights I had no or very limited success depending on the atmosphere and cloud cover. If you haven't seen it, keep trying!
John.

#163 Jae

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 07:32 AM

I agree, it's worth the effort. A friend of mine told me that he finally found it but it was further North than he thought. Rather than searching around where the sun sets, start there and move northwards.

I have the Boston skyline in the background and I can still see it with low power binoculars, quite easily. With binoculars, if you can see a couple of stars in the region, then you can see the comet. The comet still stands out more easily than many of the stars visible.

#164 GamesForOne

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 08:31 AM

With binoculars, if you can see a couple of stars in the region, then you can see the comet. The comet still stands out more easily than many of the stars visible.


I have the opposite opinion as I can find stars quite easily, but have had more difficulty spotting the comet over the last week.

The latest spaceweather.com post says estimates of mag +2.3 -- I'd estimate it more like mag +5. I observed the comet last night at ~9 deg elevation and found the diffuse core was fainter than pi Andromedae (mag +4.3) -- closer to the brightness of nearby HJ5451.

It was difficult to spot against the horizon glow in 25x100's. I could also spot it with my handheld 15x70's once I knew where to look, but it was more easily seen with averted vision in the 15x70's and was not very bright with direct vision.

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#165 johndgaul

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 07:57 PM

Perfectly clear crisp skies in South Norfolk (52 degrees N), UK, this evening. Not a cloud to be seen.

Spectacular view of the comet against the starfield through Nikon 20x120s.

A lot dimmer than when seen from Central London in the twilight back on 13 March, but brilliant contrast against the darker sky, showing a beautiful fan tail. Brighter than the Andromeda Galaxy a bit more than a binocular field (3 degrees) higher up.

Also easily spotted in 8x32s (as was the AG).

:)

#166 Mark9473

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 03:25 AM

You've wetted my appetite to have another try this evening, John, if this beautiful weather keeps up.

#167 ianatcn

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 07:35 AM

John, I was out last night in the south of UK. I have attached a copy of photo I took as it most closely resembles the view of both objects through 10x50 binoculars.

This was the first time since 13 March that the weather has allowed me to view the comet.

I was using 15x60 Zeiss to sweep it up in twilight and it was easier to see initially than the AG. I then had my 40x80 Docter in action on its new UA T-Mount light. That showed the considerable tail and the condensed nucleus very well.

The night was so good that that I spent the next couple of hours sweeping through Perseus, Auriga, Taurus, Gemini and finished in Leo. The Leo triplet was a lovely sight in the Docter, as where the four galaxies of the Leo 1 group. NGC3628 and 3384 being the most difficult but easily held at 40x.

This comet has been a real tonic after a bad winters weather. I have also enjoyed this thread immensly. It is great to hear what others are doing in terms of practical observing with their binoculars.

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#168 johndgaul

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 03:34 PM

Mark, yeah go for it! I'd almost said goodbye to PANSTARRS, but I wanted to show my family I was staying with over Easter, so got out and glimpsed it through gaps in low-lying cloud on 31 March. But yesterday was much better, a beaut, so clear - what a surprise!

Ian, thanks for sharing that fantastic photo, and your story. The picture perfectly captures the view.

#169 Mark9473

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 04:06 PM

We didn't get a repeat of yesterday's nice clear sky; it was more the usual drab semi-clear sky and the only thing fooling me into some moderate optimism was the Winter Constellations' higher number of bright stars. In the direction of the comet, beta And was the only star visible to the naked eye.

Nevertheless I got to see the comet this evening between 21:30 and 22:00 local time, with my 15x60 binoculars and with my 107mm apo at 20x magnification. In both instruments it (barely) shared the FOV with the slightly dimmer Andromeda Galaxy. The comet had a very bright nucleus and a fan shaped tail.

It should have been a very nice view, but unfortunately it was largely ruined by low altitude haze reflecting a large amount of orange light pollution. Still happy that I saw it!

#170 KennyJ

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 05:04 PM

My daughter just texted me from Oxfordshire telling me she just got a few photos of PANSTARR alongside the Andromeda Galaxy.

I told her she must be short of something useful to do! :-)

Kenny

#171 Space Dragon

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 03:07 AM

Our Western horizon had been consistently cloudy for weeks, enough to prevent me from seeing the comet.
Last night, however was clear and I was surprised at how easy it was in my TS Marine 15x70s.
With Andromeda above and a line of trees below it was a great sight and with averted vision the tail was maybe just under 1º.
A satisfying find.

#172 ronharper

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 08:44 AM

I am glad you British Isles guys are finally getting some clear sky. Special thanks to Ian for that stunning photo with M31 and a meteor trail too! Since a couple of good early views, conditions have been rotten here in Merry Olde New Mexico.
Ron

#173 planetmalc

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 11:26 AM

Finally, a clear night after a month of waiting! Saw it and M31 in the same field of my Bresser 10 x 50 Xtrawide clone. It's a least a magnitude brighter than M31. Once found, I could see it in the Minolta 6 x 18UC in spite of the industrial murk.

#174 Mark9473

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 12:07 PM

My daughter just texted me from Oxfordshire telling me she just got a few photos of PANSTARR alongside the Andromeda Galaxy.

If you meant that she had TAKEN those photos, then please post them here Kenny.

As for yourself, it looks like it's clearing over the UK at the moment, Kenny. Go for it! Here's a chart where to look about 1.5 hours after sunset.

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#175 KennyJ

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 04:33 PM

Mark,

Thanks for that very clear chart.

I've only just back home for musical rehearsals so missed the opportunity on what must be the clearest night I've seen here for many years.

My daughter sent me a link to that photo she took :

http://www.flickr.co...in/photostream/

Kenny






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