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Next Halley apparition

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#1 PhilHerring

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 09:15 PM

I'm looking forward to it. I'll be 100 years old, but hey, I come from a long-lived family!

#2 Achernar

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 10:05 AM

If I'm still alive in 2061, I will be 95 years old and probably too decrepit to be outside in the cold looking at it. I'll be long gone before Halley's returns.

Taras

#3 MessiToM

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 10:08 AM

ill be 76 unfortunately. I probably wouldnt know a comet from my home planet at that point....(Alzheimers)

#4 Lew Zealand

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 10:12 AM

I'll be 90, which means I'll have outlived everyone in the previous 4 generations of my extended family. Not gonna happen— a shame as I didn't see it in '86. However, Mrs. Zealand comes from a collection of 90+ people so she may see it after all and considering that she saw it in '86, she'll probably end up +2 viewing Halley's Comet vs. myself.

OTOH, I've seen Pan-STARRS and she hasn't yet…

#5 tigerroach

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 10:23 AM

I'll also be 100. Hopefully they will be offering luxury space cruises to go see it from close up by then. The buffet on those space cruises is going to be awesome!

#6 StarmanDan

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 10:27 AM

I'll be 90. If previous generation's longevity is any indication, I have good odds of living that long assuming Alzheimer's doesn't get me first.

#7 MikeBOKC

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 10:58 AM

OK this is on my calendar . . . only be 114, so a snap!

#8 Unknownastron

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 12:44 PM

I knew the last appearance would be it for me. I would be 108. Considering my heart trouble now I have my goal set on making it to the 2024 total eclipse. I will be 71 and at my home I will get one minute of totality.
For all you whippersnappers don,t think 75 or 80 means you will be crippled up or have alzheimers. Most people don't get alzheimers and many that age could set up a scope.
Clear skies and clean glass,
Mike

#9 Seldom

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 12:49 PM

If it's no better than the last apparition (1986?), it won't be worth the wait.

#10 Red Shift

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 01:35 PM

110 years old in 2061.
Doubtful......

Something that I hope that the contemporary crop of astronomers at that time will enjoy.

#11 FirstSight

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 01:48 PM

Unfortunately, we were born too late for the spectacular Halley's appearance back in 1910, when both its close proximity and favorable trajectory and timing made it a brilliant, vividly memorable spectacle to all who saw it, such as my maternal grandmother who saw it as a teenage girl in pre-light pollution small-town skies. She often spoke of it on starry summer evenings as we sat out in lawn chairs in her yard when I was a child. The next one in 2061 will be much better (zero magnitude) than the last one in 1986, which was the poorest and most distant since the comet has been noted in historical record. For another one rivaling the 1910 apparition, you'll have to live until its 2134 return, when it will pass only 8.4 million miles from earth.

#12 buddyjesus

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 01:51 PM

lucky me will be 86. missed the last one so happy to have a second chance

#13 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 01:52 PM

110 years old in 2061.
Doubtful......

Something that I hope that the contemporary crop of astronomers at that time will enjoy.


I would be 113... Not planning on seeing Halley's comet again unless I happen to pass it on my way out of this place. :)

Jon

#14 bunyon

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 02:36 PM

I'll be 90. So...maybe, I guess. Dad is still going strong at 79 - yeah, that's a long 11 years. All I know is, if I'm alive and have my faculties, I'll be out looking at it again.

But, am I the only one on Earth who really enjoyed the 1985/86 apparition? So it wasn't daylight visible, it was still a really nice comet. I had some wonderful early morning views in March where it was a bright naked eye object that extended a dozen degrees or more. I got some very nice photos of the comet.

It wasn't as good as Hale-Bopp. Is that the big criticism? There have been several threads lately where people are griping about Halley's last appearance. Seems odd to me.

#15 GeneT

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 04:12 PM

Hopefully, I'll be watching it from above. :grin:

#16 james867

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 04:54 PM

I was very little and someone did try to show me Halley's comet but I couldn't see it.I did see Hale-Bopp and recently Panstarrs and I'm excited about the one this November.I have a slightly better chance of seeing Halley next time around than I do of seeing Hale-Bopp again.I'm not going to get my hopes up because I may check the weather in 48 years when Halley approaches and its going to rainy and cloudy all week.

#17 MikeBOKC

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 05:32 PM

If you have not read it, there is a marvelous Mark Twain short story titled "Extract from Captain Stormfield's Visit To Heaven," something of a humorous philosophical musing on the afterlife. As most people know, Twain "came in with Halley's Comet and went out with it," dying in 1910. He was quite concious of his connection to the comet and in this story he creates a fun scene of the recently departed Captain Stormfield, aboard a vast celestial sailing ship bound for heaven, racing alongside a comet for a time. It's a great read for the religious and the skeptic alike.

#18 kfiscus

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 07:06 PM

If I recall correctly, the 2061 pass will be a very good one. I'll be 94 and have an outside shot at making it (genetically).

#19 star drop

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 08:54 PM

By 2061 I'll probably be lying in a box below the local horizon with my trusty snow shovel. Although it might be fine to be 109. Who knows?

#20 Dennis_S253

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 08:59 PM

I usually live one day at a time. Why would I think about something 48 years away?

#21 JIMZ7

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 09:19 PM

I saw Halley in 1985 when I was 38 years old. It comes around every 70 years I guess. I still kept the Halley Comet book which is sprial bound & its beautiful map. My oldest son was born a month after I saw the comet in November of 1985. I hope he keeps the book/map. Maybe it will be worth some $$$ the next time it comes around.

Jim :dob:

#22 kansas skies

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 09:37 PM

I followed the comet's last visit from start to finish and loved every minute of it. I'll only be 101 next go around, so I should probably start making plans now...

Bill

#23 bumm

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 09:41 PM

I'd be 111. I don't think I'd probably enjoy being 111, so I intend to view it vicariously through my daughter, who will be 81. I made a big deal out of it for a long time when I showed it to her when she turned five, to make sure she'd remember.
Marty

#24 Astrodj

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 01:26 AM

Well, I'll be 102, if I live that long. But, I did see the last one. Here is a shot I took in early December 1985 with my 10" Cave at ISO 1200 (Seattle Film Works movie film) for 10 minutes. If I recall it was about magnitude 9.5 at the time.

Posted Image

Some fun that was. That was taken from Tulsa, Ok. and poorly guided with a 2.4" guidescope at 120x. Photo was at prime focus.

#25 stkoepke

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 01:44 AM

I'll be "39" again the next time it comes around. (I'm not admitting just how many times I will have been 39 between now and then though...)






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