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Strange spot on HIP66004

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#1 reedcbr55

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 09:44 PM

I have an image of M51 that I took using the iTelescope.net T20 telescope and camera. While I was processing the photo in Photoshop, I zoomed in on HIP66004 and noticed a strange spot on it. Anyone have any idea what it might be? I've only included a picture of the star here but can share the entire photo, if desired. Just curious

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#2 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 10:27 PM

Looks like a dead pixel.

#3 nytecam

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 03:50 AM

Hi - welcome to CN - artifacts are possible and only identified as 'real' with a second image and slight change scope position eg any artifact 'moves' against the star background. I checked the mag 7 star [east of M51 gxy] on Sloan DSS but too bright and burnt-out!

I appreciate this is difficult with a single shot from I assume a remote scope. Check the frame for other artifacts/ hot pixels etc. For my SN hunting I always take two or more images to avoid false alarms. ;)

#4 Tony Flanders

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 05:58 AM

Looks like a dead pixel.


Seems likely. This happens to be amazingly similar to an artist's rendition of an exoplanet transiting a star. But of course the resolution of even a big professional scope with adaptive optics is 1,000 times to low to resolve this star, which lies some 400 light-years away and is no doubt a dwarf (B-V=0.234, spectral class A5, luminosity around 20 Suns, right on the main sequence).

So the "disk" is in fact entirely spurious as, no doubt, is the "planet."






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