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Current (Mar. 28) Eastern U.S. Satellite Image

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#1 Tom Polakis

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 09:42 AM

Much of the East Coast of the U.S. has a sort of standing wave pattern of clouds that match the profile of the land, displaced about 100 miles to the east. It extends from New England down to Florida. It's pretty spectacular in the visible satellite image.

U.S. Visible Satellite Image

It reminds me of lake effect clouds that often mimic the profile of the Great Lakes in satellite images. Any meteorology gurus know what's going on?

Tom

#2 herrointment

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 05:36 PM

That is neat!

#3 davebuechler

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 06:04 PM

Hoping for clear skies in KY tonight.

#4 Dan Finnerty

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 10:50 PM

You are referring to the clear zone offset from the coast?

To me it looks like the clouds moving offshore are low stratus clouds. I wonder if it is the Gulf Stream warming the air above and dissipating/evaporating the stratus layer as it passes over the warmer water...

Just a thought.

#5 Tom Polakis

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 01:08 PM

You are referring to the clear zone offset from the coast?

To me it looks like the clouds moving offshore are low stratus clouds. I wonder if it is the Gulf Stream warming the air above and dissipating/evaporating the stratus layer as it passes over the warmer water...

Just a thought.



I think you're on to something. At that same link I gave in the original post, there is a check box for sea surface temperature (SST). You can see the tight gradient from cool at the coast to warm offshore. The clouds begin where the water warms to above 20C or so. A colorful depiction of SST is here:

Sea Surface Temperature


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