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Celestron 11 inch OTA Pros and Cons ???

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#26 Starhawk

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Posted 12 April 2013 - 09:21 AM

Well, I have one answer- the brilliant blue flare is from the corrector when a magnitude 1 or brighter star is in the image. So, that is why I didn't reproduce it on the Pleiades.

Anyway, it puts 22nd magnitude in fairly easy reach, which is a pretty good trick by itself.

-Rich

#27 Dakota1

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 09:33 PM

Let me throw something else into the mix. I have a fairly new Atlas EQ-G mount and the Orion 10in newt. My XX14i is finding a new home. To go along with my 10in newt I was considering the Celestron 9.25 HD Edge. How will this go with the 10in Orion as far as visual use only. I was also thinking of a refractor in the 90mm to 127mm range. I like all observing including DSO, Clusters, Planets, Nebulas etc. I try to do a lot of star partys also. That is why I went with the Atlas mount for the tracking because of doing star partys. It is so much easier than the XX14i having to always keep moving it. At big star partys its a pain to keep up with. We sometimes have 100 to 200 parents and kids.
So that's why I need input on the 9.25HD edge or possibly the 11 Inch SCT. What ever I do it will be strictly visual only. The 9.25 would be a lot easier to handle or possibly a refractor. Any suggestion and your thoughts appreciated.
Thanks Bill

#28 Starhawk

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Posted 14 April 2013 - 12:24 AM

The C9.25 isn't really so much easier to handle- its the exact same length as a C11. I'd suggest a C8 if that's what you want to do- it can go wider in its field of view.

However, if you really want no-fuss setup with great looking visual images, refractors are hard to beat. Given the learning curve for the lower contrast SCT image, a high contrast refractor image just looks better to the average novice.

-Rich






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