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#1 StrangeDejavu

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 02:14 PM

I find myself quickly jumping from point A to point B, trying to find new objects. Only a few seconds of failed searching, I jump back to a familiar object, and it's not long before I shoot over to M42. A minute or two here and on to Jupiter for a few moments, and back to searching for something new I haven't seen yet. Between all this, i'm threading on filters and trying different Barlow/EP combinations.
Am I the only one? This hobby is fascinating, but I feel like I have ADHD observing. :p I feel like a kid at Busch Gardens, and I want to ride ALL the rides. :jump:

When did you reach a point where you slowed down and were able to appreciate one thing at a time without feeling like you're missing some grand event in some part of the sky?

#2 rinalmj

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 02:21 PM

I've always been a bit more deliberate than that, though I do find that right before coming in for the night I typically hop around to several objects very quickly to catch a few last views.

#3 jerwin

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 04:00 PM

For me it slowed after a while. At first I didn't know what I could see. So I'm in my light polluted back yard and trying to do a tour on my goto scope, and I'd slew over and look and look and look, and I maybe see something, I'm not sure what it looks like, um...I don't know....ok back to M13. Some of that was to confirm my alignment was on, but some of it was because I really like globs, and liked being able to see something that was a DSO that I was sure I knew what I was looking at. After a while I was writing down what I'm capable of seeing, and then I purchased Skytools, and that helps tell me what I should be able to see, at what time it's best to see it, with what with eyepiece it looks best. I'll take notes while observing and update them on the computer later, and try to rank them. Like doubles aren't that impressive to me, so I typically avoid them, some open clusters aren't all that impressive to me, so I'll make a note, but some open clusters I think look awesome (M11 & M46), so I'll make a note that I really like those.

Now that I have my list I'll try to sit and enjoy them on at a time(Which is why I LOVE tracking).

Love seeing my favorites from a dark site, just so much more detail, so maybe more stars. M81 and M82 from my back yard is just barely a faint fuzzy, but from dark skies...pretty awesome.

Jim

#4 lamplight

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 04:07 PM

I do have adhd but it comes out in different ways (see tagline lol)

I tend to go pretty slow when starhopping, lots of talking to myself.. ill tend to stay on one area for lots of various reasons... don't see a lot of objects on most nights.. but I will also swing back to something known also before coming in.. so far that's not much but there's a few.

One tip I've read and trying to implement: start in the west before those. objects disappear.

Whatever makes you happy.. sounds like you're having fun.

#5 chaoscosmos

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 05:40 PM

I've decided I like to navigate with just a Pocket Sky Atlas, a red flashlight, my scope and binoculars, and a planosphere at hand if I need it. It's just me and the sky and my dog occasionally coming over to have me take a break and toss her ball across the yard, and then I'm back to work as she settles down.

Most of the stuff up there is going to be there a long long time, so I figure there's no rush. I think as soon as I started finding new things beyond the obvious, it's motivated me to look for other new things. But at the same time I might go back a couple more nights in a row to look at that object again after I've read about it. That also helps reinforce my memory about that object and it's location, while at the same time I'm learning the constellation in that area and what else is there. It's sometimes a challenge to be patient but patience has its rewards. I always feel like if I learned some new things then I've accomplished something.

#6 Jeff2011

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 06:33 PM

OCO - obsessive compulsive observing. Yea I have done that too. I learned to slow down and enjoy the view, sometimes.

#7 buddyjesus

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 07:05 PM

nope me too. :jump: :jump: :jump: :jump: :jump:

#8 RCagle

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 09:15 PM

I know where your coming from lol. For me it gradually happened. At first, I would jump around all over the sky. After learning to just slow down, take your time and really look for that new object, that's when I started finding more and more DSO's. Having only manual dobsonian, I have learned to have a lot of patience in finding those faint fuzzy's. The two types of clusters are fairly easy to find because you know what to look for. Its when I start looking for the faint galaxies and nebula that I have to really slow down, take my time and look everywhere in the EP to make sure I don't miss it. Sometimes I will have to look for while because I think I will see something and have to observe for a while. Then, the more you look at it, the more you start to notice it. It just takes practice to figure out what to look for and how to look for it.

#9 StrangeDejavu

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 09:50 PM

It appears i'm in good company then. :jump:

#10 Maverick199

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 01:17 AM

This would depend entirely on the transparency and seeing conditions. For eg., I have seen M 13 many times, but there are those rare nights when I feel I am able to resolve more stars. Similarly Planets. Mars can appear as a fuzzy ball on most nights but on good nights, you can make out hints of polar caps. That is when I stop to observe longer.

#11 tezster

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 06:55 AM

I find that observing in a seated position helps 'slow' me down. And it really does help spending that extra time with an object to get to know it in more intimate detail :)

#12 kenrenard

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 07:17 AM

Try sketching what you see. It will slow you down as well as allow you to see more detail. You don't need much to start just a pencil and some paper. I also use a log book to write some thoughts about what I see.

I sometimes like my quick star tours if I am showing someone new many objects. But really looking can open quite a bit of wonder in objects you think aren't anything special.

As long as you are having fun there isn't a right or wrong way to observe. :)

Ken

#13 woolbrig

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 08:36 AM

I tend to do that too. I'm still new to all of this and I'm trying to learn how to use the mount and want to see as much as possible!

After I have all the equipment figured out I'll slow down :)

#14 Mark Costello

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 12:50 PM

I find myself quickly jumping from point A to point B, trying to find new objects. Only a few seconds of failed searching, I jump back to a familiar object, and it's not long before I shoot over to M42. A minute or two here and on to Jupiter for a few moments, and back to searching for something new I haven't seen yet. Between all this, i'm threading on filters and trying different Barlow/EP combinations.
Am I the only one? This hobby is fascinating, but I feel like I have ADHD observing. :p I feel like a kid at Busch Gardens, and I want to ride ALL the rides. :jump:

When did you reach a point where you slowed down and were able to appreciate one thing at a time without feeling like you're missing some grand event in some part of the sky?



Hi Mitch, those look to me like good questions to which I can give answers based on my personal experience. From the time I first jumped into this hobby as a 10 year old, I used to be like this, wanting to see as many celestial objects as I could in one session. I was like this for the first time I jumped in and out of the hobby, the last two times with decent telescopes, a Criterion RV6 and an 8" Dob. I would find something, look it over for a couple of minutes, then hop and try to find something else. I also stood because in my mind that's what real astronomers did. Not saying this about you or anyone else but my observing routine back then and my lack of ability to find things were the major reasons while I left and took looooong vacations from the hobby.

I jumped back in for the fifth time about 9 years ago. When I did, I decided to make major changes in my routine such as

1) Sit as much as possible.
2) Get a star chart and learn how to use it.
3) Take notes of what I'm looking at.
4) Draw what I'm looking at.
5) Ask myself questions about the object I'm observing and try to come up with answers. All this means...
6) Take at least 15-20 minutes to observe each object. If it takes up to an hour to draw something (like a piece of lunar landscape), then gittoitangiterdone. :lol:

As much as or maybe even more than picking out the right rig for me, this new routine has kept me underthe stars.

Hope this answers your questions. Best regards,

#15 StrangeDejavu

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 12:56 PM

I find myself quickly jumping from point A to point B, trying to find new objects. Only a few seconds of failed searching, I jump back to a familiar object, and it's not long before I shoot over to M42. A minute or two here and on to Jupiter for a few moments, and back to searching for something new I haven't seen yet. Between all this, i'm threading on filters and trying different Barlow/EP combinations.
Am I the only one? This hobby is fascinating, but I feel like I have ADHD observing. :p I feel like a kid at Busch Gardens, and I want to ride ALL the rides. :jump:

When did you reach a point where you slowed down and were able to appreciate one thing at a time without feeling like you're missing some grand event in some part of the sky?



Hi Mitch, those look to me like good questions to which I can give answers based on my personal experience. From the time I first jumped into this hobby as a 10 year old, I used to be like this, wanting to see as many celestial objects as I could in one session. I was like this for the first time I jumped in and out of the hobby, the last two times with decent telescopes, a Criterion RV6 and an 8" Dob. I would find something, look it over for a couple of minutes, then hop and try to find something else. I also stood because in my mind that's what real astronomers did. Not saying this about you or anyone else but my observing routine back then and my lack of ability to find things were the major reasons while I left and took looooong vacations from the hobby.

I jumped back in for the fifth time about 9 years ago. When I did, I decided to make major changes in my routine such as

1) Sit as much as possible.
2) Get a star chart and learn how to use it.
3) Take notes of what I'm looking at.
4) Draw what I'm looking at.
5) Ask myself questions about the object I'm observing and try to come up with answers. All this means...
6) Take at least 15-20 minutes to observe each object. If it takes up to an hour to draw something (like a piece of lunar landscape), then gittoitangiterdone. :lol:

As much as or maybe even more than picking out the right rig for me, this new routine has kept me underthe stars.

Hope this answers your questions. Best regards,


Sounds like it's just the excitement for me then. I already sit when possible, I write what I observe every time I go out and I have a "First" list so I can look back and see what date I first found each object. My next goal is to have a Messier checklist and work toward finishing that.

#16 Silver Bear

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 01:36 PM

I find myself quickly jumping from point A to point B, trying to find new objects. Only a few seconds of failed searching, I jump back to a familiar object, and it's not long before I shoot over to M42. A minute or two here and on to Jupiter for a few moments, and back to searching for something new I haven't seen yet. Between all this, i'm threading on filters and trying different Barlow/EP combinations.
Am I the only one? This hobby is fascinating, but I feel like I have ADHD observing. :p I feel like a kid at Busch Gardens, and I want to ride ALL the rides. :jump:

When did you reach a point where you slowed down and were able to appreciate one thing at a time without feeling like you're missing some grand event in some part of the sky?



Hi Mitch, those look to me like good questions to which I can give answers based on my personal experience. From the time I first jumped into this hobby as a 10 year old, I used to be like this, wanting to see as many celestial objects as I could in one session. I was like this for the first time I jumped in and out of the hobby, the last two times with decent telescopes, a Criterion RV6 and an 8" Dob. I would find something, look it over for a couple of minutes, then hop and try to find something else. I also stood because in my mind that's what real astronomers did. Not saying this about you or anyone else but my observing routine back then and my lack of ability to find things were the major reasons while I left and took looooong vacations from the hobby.

I jumped back in for the fifth time about 9 years ago. When I did, I decided to make major changes in my routine such as

1) Sit as much as possible.
2) Get a star chart and learn how to use it.
3) Take notes of what I'm looking at.
4) Draw what I'm looking at.
5) Ask myself questions about the object I'm observing and try to come up with answers. All this means...
6) Take at least 15-20 minutes to observe each object. If it takes up to an hour to draw something (like a piece of lunar landscape), then gittoitangiterdone. :lol:

As much as or maybe even more than picking out the right rig for me, this new routine has kept me underthe stars.

Hope this answers your questions. Best regards,


Mark, you sound like me an several past-times! I also feel ADD when it comes to many things - in, then out shortly after the first blush of any lack of success hit.

The only ones that have "stuck" with me are those where I had to slow down, and methodically pursue a planned course of action...and enjoy doing it in the process.






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