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May issues of S&T and Astronomy

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#1 MikeBOKC

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 09:05 PM

For those who may not be subscribers or book store purchasers of the two leading astronomy magazines, I picked up both today, as I do early each month, and both are oustandinging issues, each with some good, in-depth interesting articles Kudos to the staffs of both, who I know are represented here on CN.

#2 rookie

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 09:45 PM

Thanks, I read them both cover to cover. Still getting through April S&T.

#3 mountain monk

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 10:49 AM

Yes, the article in S&T on Saturn's Rings, by Beatty, was superb.

Dark skies for all beings.

Jack

#4 obrazell

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 02:31 AM

Pity about the continuing Civil war junk in S&T. Must be short of material.

owen

#5 skyquest25

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 02:55 AM

I rather liked that article and the previous article of the Hunley in the February issue. The far reaching implications moonlight has beyond the eyepiece is fanatically interesting ! Keep it up S&T, you have your readers interested. :thewave:

#6 rookie

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 06:05 AM

Sue French's writings are my favorite. I love her visual descriptions and how she learned of quirky observing bits from others.

#7 rmollise

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 06:56 AM

Pity about the continuing Civil war junk in S&T. Must be short of material.

owen


Not really. Not at all. Frankly, most comments I've heard about the excellent Hunley article were very positive indeed. Can't please everybody...but we've been down this road before here, now haven't we? :lol:

#8 MikeBOKC

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 07:33 AM

I am a Civil War student AND a collateral descendant of Stonewall Jackson, so the article was most intriguing to me. I also fail to see the drawback in relating astronomy to history . . . it just widens the potential audience for the hobby IMO.

#9 swalker

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 10:29 AM

Exactly our opinion, Mike. Thanks for the support!

#10 rmollise

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 10:11 AM

Pity about the continuing Civil war junk in S&T. Must be short of material.

owen


Just finished the Jackson article. My opinion? Astronomy + Civil War = just doesn't get much better. But that's just me. ;)

#11 davidpitre

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 01:37 PM

I agree that the May issue of S&T is excellent. Keep it up guys.
Agreed that the "Was the moon out or not during the battle?" type article does not, in my book, qualify as Astronomy. I'll put up with it, though, with such an otherwise excellent issue.

#12 Alan A.

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 02:00 PM

I agree that the May issue of S&T is excellent. Keep it up guys.
Agreed that the "Was the moon out or not during the battle?" type article does not, in my book, qualify as Astronomy. I'll put up with it, though, with such an otherwise excellent issue.


I agree completely, the May issue of Sky and Tel is otherwise excellent. I can see we are heading towards a special issue on the moon's influence on the civil war, but to be honest if we have to drift then I would prefer to see a swimsuit issue of S+T. That should also accomplish the same goals of getting media attention, increasing readership, and making current readers very happy:)

#13 MikeBOKC

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 05:30 PM

Actually there is a lot of fertile ground for exploring how past astronomical events influenced history. Keep in mind that ancient and medieval people regarded events like comets or eclipses as celestial portents, in ways that often influenced their behavior. For example, the Halley apparition in 1066 coincided with the Battle of Hastings that sealed the Norman conquest of Saxon England. The famous Bayeauex tapestry depicts King Harold and the Saxons cowering in fear at the comet, a state of mind that could very well have influenced their defeat and a major change in the course of history. If you doubt the potential of something astronomical to change history, ask the next dinosaur you meet . . .

#14 smallscopefanLeo

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 09:13 PM

Pity about the continuing Civil war junk in S&T. Must be short of material. owen

Owen, I do try to put myself in other's shoes as much as I can.. I bet it can be frustrating at times to have so much printed and electronic media be U.S. based.

However, do bear in mind that S&T has always been made -mostly- by Americans for an audience consisting of a majority of other fellow Americans. And Cloudy Nights is predominantly comprised of Americans as well. You already know this I am sure, though I thought I would gently reemphasize this reality. And yet without a doubt there are readers and members of both of these entities from across nigh the entire globe. All are welcome here to be sure, and S&T highlights amateurs and professionals from all around Earth as well.

I for one love the American Civil War connections with Astronomy (though I have yet to read this latest one ... now I am excited), but then of course I am in the target demographic for such articles. I understand that you are not ... but do please refrain from calling it "junk," for it is utter treasure for many of us. :shameonyou: You could always supplement your Astro-magazine diet with these to name a few, if you are not doing so already:
http://www.skyatnightmagazine.com/
http://www.astronomynow.com/
I doubt you will see an excess of American Civil War articles in those two. :p

I would love to subscribe to those, and other English language astronomy publications from -all- over, but my funds and storage space allotments have put a limit on how many magazines I can voraciously consume. For now, it has to remain just 1 astro mag, sadly. But what a one it is.

(By the way, I just placed a substantial (for me) order of several books and atlases over at the S&T store early today using the April coupon APRSKY13 that is ending tomorrow, don't forget y'all.. :grin:)

#15 Vince Tramazzo

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 11:23 PM

Here we go again!

#16 David E

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 09:52 AM

Pity about the continuing Civil war junk in S&T. Must be short of material.

owen


I haven't read that one yet, but look forward to reading it tonight. That one is actually the latest in a long string of articles tying astronomical events to events in history. They've been doing that for several years now actually, and I always enjoy those types of articles. :waytogo:S&T

#17 Rick Woods

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 10:12 AM

Historical articles concerning events in other (non-USA) countries that were influenced/determined by astronomical phenomenon would be fun, too. These articles just make S&T all that much more well-rounded.

And, where else could you publish something like that, that has a relatively small target audience, yet probably required a lot of intensive research and effort to write?

I appreciate the authors for chasing these stories down, and S&T for publishing them.

#18 Tony Flanders

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 11:32 AM

Keep in mind that ancient and medieval people regarded events like comets or eclipses as celestial portents, in ways that often influenced their behavior. For example ... the famous Bayeauex tapestry depicts King Harold and the Saxons cowering in fear at the Halley's Comet, a state of mind that could very well have influenced their defeat ...


I doubt it. The Bayeux Tapestry represents the victors writing history; the Normans are retrospectively treating Halley's Comet as a portent of the Saxon's defeat. But at the time it appeared, it could equally well have been a portent of the Norman's defeat.

In any case, the Normans won because of their vastly superior military technology, in particular the use of armored cavalry.

However, the Sun and Moon are quintessentially astronomical objects, and they most certainly do affect human affairs in major ways. It's useful to be reminded just how important the Moon was before the invention of the electric light.

Obviously, even today, no self-respecting military commander would plan a night attack without taking the Moon's phase into account.

#19 edwincjones

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 03:24 PM

"........if we have to drift, I would perfer a swimsuit edition of S+T......"

I don't know-looking in a mirror,
thinking of other amateur astronomers on the observing fields,
I do not think that we would be that impressive in swim suits.

probably would not help sales

edj

#20 MikeBOKC

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 03:52 PM

True Tony . . .an arrow through the eye will definitely ruin your day, even if you are a king.

#21 Robo-bob

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 04:11 PM

"........if we have to drift, I would perfer a swimsuit edition of S+T......"

I don't know-looking in a mirror,
thinking of other amateur astronomers on the observing fields,
I do not think that we would be that impressive in swim suits.

probably would not help sales

edj


Speak for yourself. I am oh, so,so, sexy......NOT! :lol:

#22 Jay_Bird

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 04:34 PM

A lot of my enjoyment of S&T on and off for over 30 years years came from serendipity rather than predictability.

E.C. Krupp's rambling columns covered some topics in this vein years ago, and in the last decade the articles like this one are entertaining. S&T articles about the sinking of the Indianapolis, or an older article about Paul Revere crossing Bostom Harbor also described the role of moonlight in historical events.

For non-USA topics covered recently, Mary Shelley's Lake Geneva vacation was a good read - I think of that story whenever moonlight shines in a window. There was another 'astronomy in history' article for the Romans' amphibious landing in Britain, and for the time of day and year for Muench's "the scream".

Not just moonlight, but tides too are important to military planning - Tarawa was a sobering lesson.

If you're looking for new topics:

The challenges and instruments of polar navigation might entertain; thinking of Amundsen, Cook, Scott, Peary, and Shackleton's tools of the trade and perhaps discussion of Cook vs. Peary observations, claims and ultimate recognition.

While Eratosthenes made a very early and accurate measure of Earth's circumference, Ptolemy rejected that and used work by others that perpetuated an under-estimate of earth's size. Who were the others besides Eratoshthenes considered by Ptolemy, what were their methods?

Please keep up the interesting diversity or unpredictability of topics in S&T, it's good to have seasonal side dishes with the monthly column regulars.

#23 Rick Woods

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 08:21 PM

Well said!

#24 skyquest25

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 11:54 PM

Agreed :-)

#25 edwincjones

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 05:48 AM

"........if we have to drift, I would perfer a swimsuit edition of S+T......"

I don't know-looking in a mirror,
thinking of other amateur astronomers on the observing fields,
I do not think that we would be that impressive in swim suits.

probably would not help sales

edj


Speak for yourself. I am oh, so,so, sexy......NOT! :lol:



I can see it now--on the cover-front AND back of S&T,
a wide field view of the observing field,
the open plains, telescopes, all the amateurs in speedos

how about it S&T

THE ASTRONOMERS OF TSP :question:
or NSP :question:
or WSP :question:

edj






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