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Where the Eagle landed

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#1 rg55

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 07:35 PM

180mm Maksutov, NexImage 5.

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#2 highfnum

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 07:45 PM

I remember look up at moon when they were there
it seems so long ago
nice pic - no neximage 5 in those days

#3 rg55

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 11:33 AM

It's been far too long, hasn't it? Thanks for you comments, highfnum.

#4 JerryOrr

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 10:21 AM

Great image. You even captured crater Armstrong pretty well, as well as craters Collins and Aldrin as white spots to the west of Armstrong (Collins right under the left leg of the A and Aldrin just to the upper right of the P). I've been trying, for the last several lunations, to visually observe these craters through my 90mm refractor. I've observed Armstrong several times now, but Collins and Aldrin still escape me, I guess I'm going to need to wait for the near mythical 10/10 night.

#5 David Knisely

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 01:07 PM

Great image. You even captured crater Armstrong pretty well, as well as craters Collins and Aldrin as white spots to the west of Armstrong (Collins right under the left leg of the A and Aldrin just to the upper right of the P). I've been trying, for the last several lunations, to visually observe these craters through my 90mm refractor. I've observed Armstrong several times now, but Collins and Aldrin still escape me, I guess I'm going to need to wait for the near mythical 10/10 night.


I think you will have to wait for a little more aperture. Collins is only 2.4 km (1.5 miles) across while Aldrin is 3.4 km (2.1 miles) in diameter. A good "rule of thumb" is that to show a craterlet as a true pit half filled with shadow, its minimum diameter in miles is given by 9/D, where D is the aperture of the telescope in inches. A 90mm aperture should be able to show craters down to around 2.5 miles across or so without much of a problem, so a bigger scope is probably in order. Armstrong (4.6 km or 2.9 miles across) is within range of your scope, but Collins will probably need something approaching a six inch aperture to show up well. The nearest craterlet to the Apollo 11 landing site that may be seen from Earth in most amateur telescopes is probably "Cat's Paw", but that one takes probably something around eight inches to be seen with much certainty (see LRO image below courtesy NASA). Clear skies to you.

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