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#1 CygnuS

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 06:13 PM

The latest (June) Astronomy magazine has a title "Historic Russian Meteorite Fall." I know I'm splitting hairs here but is this correct? It isn't called a meteorite until it hits the ground. That means that a meteorite can't fall unless you drop it. Shouldn't the title be "Historic Russian Meteor Fall."?

#2 bob71741

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 07:27 PM

In my opinion, the title is correct in its context; meteorites did fall.

If the title was ...the meteorite lit up the sky, then that is obviously incorrect, and I believe that is the most incorrect usage that we usually see/hear. Another common one is; did you see the meteorite last night?

#3 oblako

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 08:14 PM

The latest (June) Astronomy magazine has a title "Historic Russian Meteorite Fall." I know I'm splitting hairs here but is this correct? It isn't called a meteorite until it hits the ground. That means that a meteorite can't fall unless you drop it. Shouldn't the title be "Historic Russian Meteor Fall."?

When we talk about meteors we say "meteor showers" and we do not say "meteor falls". Russian meteoroid exploded in the atmosphere and its peaces landed on the ground. So the article's name is correct. IMO the better name for the article would have been simply "Historic Russian Meteoroid" because IMO it is the meteoroid that made that meteorite fall historic, or should I say more historic? After all it was the meteoroid that exploded, creating the sonic wave that hurt more than a thousand. If there were no explosion, it would probably still have been a historic meteorite fall simply for its size, but dramatic explosion that made the meteor brighter than the sun was really something.

#4 Ira

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 09:21 PM

Hemorrhoid-Hemeor-Hemeorite. :tonofbricks:

/Ira

#5 CygnuS

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 09:21 PM

In my opinion, the title is correct in its context; meteorites did fall.

Since the meteor exploded before it hit the ground, are you saying that the flying fragments are defined as meteorites before landing?

#6 Ira

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 09:54 PM

A meteor is a flash of light. It cannot explode. The meteoroid exploded, causing the flash of light.

The meteor is the light phenomenon in the sky. It is caused by an object called a meteoroid while travelling through the atmosphere. A meteoroid may or may not strike the ground. If it does, it becomes a meteorite. A meteorite cannot be falling from the sky, unless you pick it up and toss it in the air and let it hit the ground again. But a meteorite can have fallen from the sky.

/Ira

#7 oblako

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 12:04 AM

A meteor is a flash of light. It cannot explode. The meteoroid exploded, causing the flash of light.

The meteor is the light phenomenon in the sky. It is caused by an object called a meteoroid while travelling through the atmosphere. A meteoroid may or may not strike the ground. If it does, it becomes a meteorite. A meteorite cannot be falling from the sky, unless you pick it up and toss it in the air and let it hit the ground again. But a meteorite can have fallen from the sky.

/Ira

You are right. Thank you. :bow: I fixed my post above, and hopefully this tome I got it right although on the other hand most news agencies including CNN http://www.cnn.com/2...a-meteor-shower , Washington Post http://www.washingto...prise-attack... , USA Today http://www.usatoday..../02/15/1922121/ and even PBS http://www.pbs.org/n...rth-after-me... and NOVA http://novacelestica...-explodes-ov... say "meteor explodes"

#8 CygnuS

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 06:24 AM

It sounds like you're saying that Astronomy magazine's title should be "Historic Russian Meteoroid Fall" since a meteor is simply light and a meteorite can't fall since it's already fallen.

#9 peter scherff

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 06:25 AM

Just to add to the confusion there is a cutoff at about 10 meters between asteroids and meteoroids. So it was an asteroid that broke apart over Russia. : )

Thanks,

Peter

#10 Ira

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 07:08 AM

These names are all confusing to the public, so I think the media use the most common name that makes sense. Very different from strict scientific usage.

/Ira

#11 CygnuS

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 04:01 PM

You're right Peter. And I might add that Sky & Telescope had that headline correct in May's issue. I'm certainly not trying to bash Astronomy magazine. I like them both equally.
I agree Ira. The way "Astronomy" worded it does make sense. The problem is that I expect that from the main stream media. I also expect incorrect things like "nebulas and supernovas" from the MSM....but not Astronomy magazine.

#12 peter scherff

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 04:11 PM

The American Meteor Society has a great poster that gives most definitions that we need.

Peter

#13 Ira

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 06:49 PM

The American Meteor Society has a great poster that gives most definitions that we need.

Peter


But even they get it wrong as they define "Bolide" as "a large meteor that explodes in the atmosphere". They mean a large meteoroid! :)

/Ira

#14 BSJ

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 09:52 AM

When did everything become "SUPER"?

#15 careysub

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 01:49 PM

The latest (June) Astronomy magazine has a title "Historic Russian Meteorite Fall." I know I'm splitting hairs here but is this correct? It isn't called a meteorite until it hits the ground. That means that a meteorite can't fall unless you drop it. Shouldn't the title be "Historic Russian Meteor Fall."?


"Historic Russian Meteorite Fall", "Historic Russian Meteoroid Fall", and "Historic Russian Meteoroid Fall" would all be correct, they just mean slightly different things. The first emphasizes the pieces that hit the ground, the second emphasizes the parent body, the third the visual apparition of the fall. We are fortunate that language is flexible like that.

#16 Ira

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 10:08 PM

If there is one thing it wasn't, it wasn't an "historic Russian meteorite fall" because very little of it survived to become a meteorite. If anything, it was an historically small meteorite fall, but an historically large meteor and meteoroid fall.

/Ira

#17 dreamregent

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 09:54 AM

The American Meteor Society has a great poster that gives most definitions that we need.

Peter


Considering the various definitions on the poster:

If a piece of a meteoroid that hit the ground is called a meteorite, why don't we call a piece of an asteroid that does the same thing an asterite?
Just throwing that out there... :lol:

#18 Ira

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 10:36 AM

Or we could call it a "bolideite" or a "fireballite".

/Ira

#19 careysub

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 02:15 PM

Can't edit it, but that was:
Historic Russian Meteorite Fall", "Historic Russian Meteoroid Fall", and "Historic Russian Meteor Fall"

#20 StarWars

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Posted 02 June 2013 - 09:17 AM

The latest (June) Astronomy magazine has a title "Historic Russian Meteorite Fall." I know I'm splitting hairs here but is this correct? It isn't called a meteorite until it hits the ground. That means that a meteorite can't fall unless you drop it. Shouldn't the title be "Historic Russian Meteor Fall."?




Russian 'meteor' was actually a tiny asteroid..

NASA scientists said the object that exploded over Russia was a “tiny asteroid” that measured roughly 45 feet across, weighed about 10,000 tons and traveled about 40,000 mph.

The object vaporized roughly 15 miles above the surface of the Earth, causing a shock wave that triggered the global network of listening devices that was established to detect nuclear test explosions.

The force of the explosion measured between 300 and 500 kilotons.

"Historic Russian Asteroid Fall."

#21 CygnuS

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 04:15 PM

July's Astronomy magazine snapshot (page 9) is worded "Implications of the Russian METEORITE fall" and the first sentence reads "The breakup of a METEOROID over......"






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