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It's all your fault, CN

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#51 Paco_Grande

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 08:36 PM

... But I think I gotta buy a new water heater for the house, so I GUESS that will have to wait. I told my wife I didnt mind cold showers. She gave me "the" look.

:funny: :lol:

Awesome :D

#52 David Ault

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 10:46 PM


I think the best suggestion I can make is to join your local astronomy club. You don't need your own scope and frequently clubs have loner scopes and will give you some lessons on how to use them. Also, a lot of clubs have star parties and outreach events and these are great opportunities to ask questions, see what types of equipment people are using and get to peek through their eyepieces. This will really help you form an opinion about what you want to view and what equipment might work best for you.

Wise words! I'm checking out the local club, looks like they have a star party in May.


Thanks Nick. I'm glad you like the pics and I hope you have a good time at the star party. I try to do as much outreach in my area as I can and find that it's just as fun whether you're the person behind the telescope or the one asking questions and it's almost impossible to not learn anything either way.

Regards,
David

#53 jchaller

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 10:51 PM

You fool! You fell victim to one of the classic blunders! The most famous is never to get involved in a land
war in Asia. And only slightly less well known is this: never buy a pair of binoculars for viewing the night
sky and think that will be the end of it. :grin:

Welcome to Cloudy Nights and good luck in your quest.

The 6SE has been mentioned a couple of times. I have one, which I take camping/fishing and it works fine.

#54 David Ault

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 11:05 PM

"The Maksutovs and Refractors don't require this (collimation) at all"

Actually, this is not true. ALL scopes, regardless of make, model, and type of glass/mirrors used, require collimation. That being said,most refractors are collimated at the factory and won't need touched ever again, but they are initially collimatted, and some have collimateable objective lenses.


csrlice12, you are quite right. Looking back at what I typed, my statement looks definitive rather than what I was thinking in my head, which was that from a practical perspective Maksutovs and Refractors rarely require collimation. I've never owned a refractor or Maksutov that I've had to collimate, nor known anyone that has, even with some heavy abuse (i.e. bumping around in the back of a car on horrible dirt roads for miles). Sorry for the confusion.

Regards,
David

#55 Tony Flanders

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 04:53 AM

The frontrunners right now are
1.) Orion ST80 w/EQ-2 or VX mount
2.) Celestron 6SE


Wow! They're both fine packages, but two telescopes more different are hard to imagine.

The 6SE has vastly more light grasp and resolution, a vastly narrower field of view, can only be used in electronic mode, and is highly prone to dew. It's great for viewing individual objects, especially small ones, and virtually worthless for browsing the sky.

The ST80 has an enormous field of view but is mediocre at high power. It's fully manual, a great instrument for browsing the sky but not so great for zeroing in on specific objects -- especially not on planets.

#56 Eric63

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 06:05 AM

A 5" or 6" F5 Newtonian would do both ;)

#57 Paco_Grande

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 11:14 AM

A 5" or 6" F5 Newtonian would do both ;)


:ubetcha:

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#58 kraberus

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 11:05 AM

Well, it is done. I decided to go "short" and relatively low-tech for my first scope. Orion ST80-A with the EQ-1 plus a pile of eyepieces, filters and a dielectric star diagonal...and still enough left over to consider a NexStar or Dob before too long...

Thanks everyone for helping me.

#59 David Ault

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 12:08 PM

Congratulations Nick! I'm sure you'll have a lot of fun with that setup. Hopefully you don't get hit with the new equipment curse and you have clear skies when all those boxes come in!

Regards,
David

#60 kraberus

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 11:06 AM

Well, the ST80 w/ EQ-1 arrived yesterday. It is a wonderful instrument. I cobbled it together and enjoyed probably the best seeing conditions so far this year.

Some notes on the scope itself - Well built, though the tube is easily scuffed up by the tube rings. The inside of the dew shield is already flocked to a nice flat black. From what I can tell, this is recent improvement - I was expecting to have to do this myself.

The rack-and-pinion focuser is stiff, but not overly so.

The EQ-1 is just fine (not that I have much to compare it to :p). It wobbles a bit while focusing but it damps out within a few seconds.

Targets from red-zone LP'd driveway:

Saturn - Just a dot with the 20mm eyepiece (20x), Startlingly beautiful with the 9mm Expanse (44x). Rings clearly distinct with a small dot below, possibly Titan? Some features visible on the surface.
M13 - I was very pleased to be able to find this. No individual starts visible, just a hazy snowball. Still pretty cool though.
Epsilone Lyrae - Split the double next to Vega.

No luck with M81 or M82. Not sure if it's realistic to see these in a red zone, plus I'm still getting used to the finder being upside down :p

Chromatic aberrations were minor and not distracting at all. Next time I will try the v-block filter and see what that does.

Hopefully tonight I can try the Barlow plus the short Plossls.

Memorable moment of the night - a minor coronary event caused by the 737 that flew thru my FOV while I was mesmerized by Saturn's rings.

Thanks again everyone... :bow:






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