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RACI finder scope

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#51 Haas

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 05:50 PM

LOL, I know. I had my mind set on a RACI, now I'm thinking about laser also.

#52 newtoskies

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 06:04 PM

Me too Haas. Been looking at RACI's and trying to find the green laser pointer. I had seen them before, but now that I am interested in it, I can't find them..lol

#53 Haas

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 06:07 PM

Me too Haas. Been looking at RACI's and trying to find the green laser pointer. I had seen them before, but now that I am interested in it, I can't find them..lol


I'm looking at one here, but don't know if I should be looking at others or not. This is the only one I've found so far.

http://www.telescope...pes/pc/3/49.uts

#54 Grandpa Jim

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 08:27 PM

Me too Haas. Been looking at RACI's and trying to find the green laser pointer. I had seen them before, but now that I am interested in it, I can't find them..lol


http://www.scopestuff.com/ss_lasre.htm

http://www.scopestuff.com/ss_sfind.htm :)

#55 Haas

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 08:36 PM

I have to admit something here, maybe irrational, but here goes. One thing that scares me with the laser pointers is, what if I'm pointing out at a star, or moon, or anything else, and that just happens to be an area where an airplane comes into the same line as the laser? I don't want to be in trouble for being accused of deliberately pointing a laser at an airplane. Silly fear, or legit? Of course it wouldn't be on purpose, but accidents do happen.

#56 Kunama

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 02:24 AM

in response to a few comments of the RACI being hard to get to on an Eq mounted Newt, the Stellarvue has a rotateable diagonal to allow a better angle if the scope rotation causes the focuser to be difficult to access.

It also fits beautifully into the Takahashi finder bracket and probably many other brackets, by simply removing the diagonal then installing the finder tube and lastly refit the diagonal. See pic below on my TSA120 in the Tak bracket.

Posted Image

I did have to paint the Stellarvue to better match the Tak TSA, but the benefits of not bending my arthritic old neck to odd angles are well worth it:

Posted Image

#57 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 02:33 AM

For the brief time a laser is used, statistically speaking an aircraft will be intercepted in its beam at almost vanishingly small probabilities.

I mean, think of it. A plane might subtend an angle of 2 arcminutes. That amounts to an area of 0.0000085% of the 180 degrees of the celestial hemisphere. What do you think are that chances of accidentally illuminating a cockpit?

#58 Haas

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 08:30 AM

For the brief time a laser is used, statistically speaking an aircraft will be intercepted in its beam at almost vanishingly small probabilities.

I mean, think of it. A plane might subtend an angle of 2 arcminutes. That amounts to an area of 0.0000085% of the 180 degrees of the celestial hemisphere. What do you think are that chances of accidentally illuminating a cockpit?


I dunno, I'm a little leary going strictly by chance, even when the odds are in my favor. Ever hear the joke, "when it's a 50/50 chance, there's a 95% chance I'll pick the wrong one"? That's me! :D
I'm fairly close to the Milwaukee airport too. I think I'll try the RACI, and if I still have issues, then I'll give the laser a whirl.

#59 newtoskies

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 09:01 AM

Haas I was looking at the Orion one too, after my comment above. I hadn't realized they were that expensive. I'll just get a RACI first, then wait for when the budget allows for another toy.
I have the RIGEL finder but only used it once. LP here so the Rigel didn't help me much....yet.

#60 Haas

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 09:19 AM

Haas I was looking at the Orion one too, after my comment above. I hadn't realized they were that expensive. I'll just get a RACI first, then wait for when the budget allows for another toy.
I have the RIGEL finder but only used it once. LP here so the Rigel didn't help me much....yet.



LP= ?

Nevermind, just dawned on me "light pollution". :p

#61 SteveG

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 12:34 PM

For the brief time a laser is used, statistically speaking an aircraft will be intercepted in its beam at almost vanishingly small probabilities.

I mean, think of it. A plane might subtend an angle of 2 arcminutes. That amounts to an area of 0.0000085% of the 180 degrees of the celestial hemisphere. What do you think are that chances of accidentally illuminating a cockpit?


I use a laser every night out. It draws a precision line to the point in the sky the scope is looking at. You would have to purposely try to shine the beam into the cockpit of an airplane. If it were to happen by chance, it would likely only hit the bottom of the plane - for a brief second, and no one would ever know. Claims that 5mW or less lasers are somehow unsafe for astronomy are unfounded, in my opinion.

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#62 pjensen

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 12:43 PM

For the brief time a laser is used, statistically speaking an aircraft will be intercepted in its beam at almost vanishingly small probabilities.

I mean, think of it. A plane might subtend an angle of 2 arcminutes. That amounts to an area of 0.0000085% of the 180 degrees of the celestial hemisphere. What do you think are that chances of accidentally illuminating a cockpit?


I use a laser every night out. It draws a precision line to the point in the sky the scope is looking at. You would have to purposely try to shine the beam into the cockpit of an airplane. If it were to happen by chance, it would likely only hit the bottom of the plane - for a brief second, and no one would ever know.


I live in the dallas/fort worth area and on a busy night, there can be a plane coming in to land every minute. Typically they are 3000' to 5000' above (where I live). Every month or so, we hear of someone being arrested for shining lasers - it makes the evening news. Apparently it is a serious crime (Homeland Security). If a pilot sees a laser (nearby), they will report it.

So it might depend where you are using those laser pointers. Just something to consider.

#63 Thomas Karpf

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 12:57 PM

Claims that 5mW or less lasers are somehow unsafe for astronomy are unfounded, in my opinion.


I agree. However, it seems to me I've read recently (at NEAF, I think) that those 'power is under ###mW' claims are ofter not particularly accurate.

#64 newtoskies

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 01:25 PM

I have planes overhead, almost. They fly from SW to N-NE, from Prov. to Boston. Luckily I can't view in those directions due to trees, house and LP. I view mainly NE-SE and they don't fly in that area. Will have to consider a laser.






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