Jump to content


Photo

Could the Samsung Nx1000 work fo astrophotography?

  • Please log in to reply
28 replies to this topic

#1 Sean Wood

Sean Wood

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 138
  • Joined: 19 Apr 2011
  • Loc: North Carolina

Posted 01 May 2013 - 12:39 PM

Thinking of maybe doing some astrophotography(Famous last words, right?). Woot.com keeps posting the Samsung NX1000 for $299. With it being 20.3MP, having less mass and weight than a typical DSLR and yet still having the ability for interchangeable lenses, a must for a T-mount. I was thinking it might make it ok for entry level astrophotography. Or would it would be an outright waste of time and money, please explain why it would be.

It seems to have a 4 min maximum "bulb" time. Would that be a significant problem?

Educated guesses as to what types of modifications I might would have to make to use it, if using it is even an option would be appreciated.

#2 areichow

areichow

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 3
  • Joined: 30 Apr 2013

Posted 01 May 2013 - 01:31 PM

I've wondered that myself, for wide field/starscape type shots. Consensus seems to be that the camera isn't great for low-light work, though IQ at lower ISOs seems pretty good.

#3 mpgxsvcd

mpgxsvcd

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1949
  • Joined: 21 Dec 2011
  • Loc: Raleigh, North Carolina

Posted 01 May 2013 - 01:44 PM

You are probably going to just get a bunch of comments like. Use a Canon. It is better. I haven’t tried the NX so I am not sure if it is good or not. However, I do have a lot of experience with Micro Four Thirds cameras that are very similar in terms of low light exposure so I will share my thoughts and hypothesis.

The bulb limit really depends on the final focal ratio of your scope. I use an F4.0 scope and I blow out the sky in my backyard in 1 minute at ISO 1600. Therefore, I rarely need to go over 4 minutes. However, if you are running an F8.0 or slower scope you could definitely need 4 minutes or more depending on your sky conditions.

The Samsung NX cameras are APS-C sized sensors. However, they have packed a lot of pixels into those sensors. The low light high ISO performance of the NX cameras is fine in the test results I have seen but I am not sure if it applies noise reduction to the RAW files or not.

If it doesn’t apply any noise reduction to the RAW files then it should give you basically the same output that the Canon cameras do for stacking images. Both sensors score very similar results on DXO mark.

http://www.dxomark.c...ompare-camer...

My personal preference would be to get a Panasonic GX1 over the Samsung if you are using a faster scope. I like the way the live view mode on the Panasonic cameras work for AP. With those cameras you don’t need to use anything like BackyardEOS for focusing or aligning. You can do everything in camera. The NX may be similar. However, I haven’t seen any tests of that aspect for the NX. I use it all the time on my m4/3s cameras.

The bulb mode on the GX1 is limited to 120 seconds. However, tracking and sky glow usually start to become an issue before that especially if you are not guiding.

You can get a brand new GX1 on Amazon for $260.

http://www.amazon.co...B00604YTFM/r...

If you really need 4 minutes for bulb mode then the Panasonic G2 will do that and it is only $310 for the body only on Amazon.

http://www.amazon.co...004ACBYIQ/re...

#4 nofxrx

nofxrx

    Vendor (HyperCams & Mods)

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 5241
  • Joined: 12 Jul 2005
  • Loc: Palm Bay,Florida

Posted 01 May 2013 - 08:41 PM

Alright, just so I do not start any debates on whether a specific camera/model/manufacturer can be used for AP or not, let me just simplify it by saying this:

No matter what, CURRENTLY(and for the past ~4-6 YEARS) Canon has dominated the AP community.
Why?
Because they are great cameras.
They already have a TON of software and support for them (hello, BackYardEOS is reason ALONE to buy a Canon IMHO!!!!!)
And they PRODUCE. no questions asked. plug and play.
No worrying about this or that or anything...
They WORK.

Pretty much every digital camera (when I say that I am referring to ANY *removable lens type system*) nowadays is capable of brilliant images, both daytime and AP.


IMHO, get a Canon APS-C or Full Frame DSLR, get it modified, and you will be very happy.

Get something else, and you will probably still be very happy, but it may not be as easy to do.



RE: NX1000
I had an NX100, and it was HORRIBLE at ISO800 and up...

If I were looking at a mirror-less option, I would look no further than the Sony NEX cameras.
Great image quality thanks to the world famous Sony sensors ;)
And they can be modified for AP/Full Spectrum/etc...
(I am sure the NX1000 is too, but I have not personally modified one, yet, so cannot comment on it)

Kay, I said my peace.. :grin:

Good luck!

#5 mpgxsvcd

mpgxsvcd

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1949
  • Joined: 21 Dec 2011
  • Loc: Raleigh, North Carolina

Posted 02 May 2013 - 08:38 AM

They already have a TON of software and support for them (hello, BackYardEOS is reason ALONE to buy a Canon IMHO!!!!!)


The only problem I have with this statement is that it implies that ALL cameras need "a TON of software and support". In the past you had to have computer software that would allow the cameras to use longer shutter durations in live view or semi-live view. That is one of the reasons why BackYardEOS was created and it works very well to remedy that issue for Canon cameras. For Nikon cameras the software isn't there yet.

However, recently some mirrorless cameras(Panasonic and maybe more) have remedied the problem by putting the software into the camera directly which can eliminate the need for a computer at all. The issue is that not enough people know this. The stereotype that you cannot use in camera live view for AP will continue to persist until someone speaks up about it and enough people listen.

There is nothing wrong with recommending or using a Canon camera for AP. Like you said it works. However, the problem I have is when it is called the best camera simply because almost no one will dare try anything else.

#6 Footbag

Footbag

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5762
  • Joined: 13 Apr 2009
  • Loc: Scranton, PA

Posted 02 May 2013 - 10:27 AM


They already have a TON of software and support for them (hello, BackYardEOS is reason ALONE to buy a Canon IMHO!!!!!)


The only problem I have with this statement is that it implies that ALL cameras need "a TON of software and support". In the past you had to have computer software that would allow the cameras to use longer shutter durations in live view or semi-live view. That is one of the reasons why BackYardEOS was created and it works very well to remedy that issue for Canon cameras. For Nikon cameras the software isn't there yet.

However, the problem I have is when it is called the best camera simply because almost no one will dare try anything else.


You could use Magic Lantern and Canon will do all of that in camera, but I find a huge benefit of having a laptop with me in the field. Much easier to frame, align, focus, etc...

I'll be the first to ridicule Canon and other manufacturers for not allowing that to happen in a stock camera, but that's not to say I'd use the feature without my laptop if available. The laptop allows me to be more meticulous, and that improves my images.

Now Backyard EOS and soon to be NIK are amazing packages. They are simple, intuitive, and don't cost a lot. They alone are a good reason to buy a Canon (or a Nikon in anticipation).

#7 mpgxsvcd

mpgxsvcd

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1949
  • Joined: 21 Dec 2011
  • Loc: Raleigh, North Carolina

Posted 02 May 2013 - 10:58 AM

You could use Magic Lantern and Canon will do all of that in camera, but I find a huge benefit of having a laptop with me in the field. Much easier to frame, align, focus, etc...

Now Backyard EOS and soon to be NIK are amazing packages. They are simple, intuitive, and don't cost a lot. They alone are a good reason to buy a Canon (or a Nikon in anticipation).


Have you tried the Panasonic or Olympus live view for AP? If not how can you say a laptop makes it "Much easier to frame, align, focus, etc..."?

I have done it with BackyardEOS and with the Panasonic camera. Both giving me the exact same abilities. The big thing is that doing it in camera allows me to do those things without the computer, battery issues, or the cables that go with it.

#8 Footbag

Footbag

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5762
  • Joined: 13 Apr 2009
  • Loc: Scranton, PA

Posted 02 May 2013 - 11:10 AM


Have you tried the Panasonic or Olympus live view for AP? If not how can you say a laptop makes it "Much easier to frame, align, focus, etc..."?

I have done it with BackyardEOS and with the Panasonic camera. Both giving me the exact same abilities. The big thing is that doing it in camera allows me to do those things without the computer, battery issues, or the cables that go with it.



I've used the camera screen live view with my Canon camera.

It has nothing to do with the capabilities or brand of the camera, it's the size of the screen. When I first started imaging, I used live view via the camera screen. I just couldn't see the screen well enough or find the buttons I needed. I didn't like touching the camera, because that could change the orientation or bump the mount. The other thing is that Live View actually creates lots of noise and occasionally glow. You need to turn the screen off before imaging. I use live view to frame and focus, then turn it off and let the camera cool down. Then I begin my acquisition routine.

#9 mpgxsvcd

mpgxsvcd

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1949
  • Joined: 21 Dec 2011
  • Loc: Raleigh, North Carolina

Posted 02 May 2013 - 11:38 AM



Have you tried the Panasonic or Olympus live view for AP? If not how can you say a laptop makes it "Much easier to frame, align, focus, etc..."?

I have done it with BackyardEOS and with the Panasonic camera. Both giving me the exact same abilities. The big thing is that doing it in camera allows me to do those things without the computer, battery issues, or the cables that go with it.



I've used the camera screen live view with my Canon camera.

It has nothing to do with the capabilities or brand of the camera, it's the size of the screen. When I first started imaging, I used live view via the camera screen. I just couldn't see the screen well enough or find the buttons I needed. I didn't like touching the camera, because that could change the orientation or bump the mount. The other thing is that Live View actually creates lots of noise and occasionally glow. You need to turn the screen off before imaging. I use live view to frame and focus, then turn it off and let the camera cool down. Then I begin my acquisition routine.


That is most of the problem. The things you mention are specific to how the DSLR live view works. With Mirrorless cameras, built-in wifi, and touch screens it is a little different.

A simple red Acrylic cover can remedy the LCD light pollution issue. However, I typically just turn the screen off and use the Electronic View Finder. That is something that the DSLR’s can’t do because their view finders are optical.

The screen size really shouldn’t matter for focusing or alignment if you are using the magnified view. When the field of view is magnified to 10x it really won’t matter how big the screen is. The screen on the cameras I have is actually quite large.

In addition all of the new Panasonic micro four thirds cameras come with built-in wifi that can wirelessly stream the live view to a tablet. That will give you your hands free operation and the larger screen size you desire.

I will say that I have only tried the focusing with a Newtonian and the live view. The vanes on the Newtonian really make the focusing a lot easier than using another type of scope without a Bahtinov mask.

#10 Footbag

Footbag

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5762
  • Joined: 13 Apr 2009
  • Loc: Scranton, PA

Posted 02 May 2013 - 12:30 PM

That is most of the problem. The things you mention are specific to how the DSLR live view works. With Mirrorless cameras, built-in wifi, and touch screens it is a little different.

A simple red Acrylic cover can remedy the LCD light pollution issue. However, I typically just turn the screen off and use the Electronic View Finder. That is something that the DSLR’s can’t do because their view finders are optical.



I agree that built in WiFi would be nice, but I don't see mirrorless cameras operation being much different then DSLR's. You still have buttons, and relatively small screens. The benefit of the DSLR being slightly less noise. The benefit of the mirrorless being weight and size.

I don't find the viewfinder or the screen useful. I really do need to see my images on my laptop. I don't even think I'd be happy with an 11" laptop screen. With PHD, I have the laptop out there anyway, I might as well get the most out of it.

This morning, for example, I was shooting some flats for last nights session. I looked at the BYE screen and noticed one of my dust doughnuts was moving around with each exposure. I think it was dust, and was able to retake flats after tilting the tube differently; but if I had not noticed it, I wouldn't have any flats for my entire session. I never would have noticed that on the cameras LCD.

After I'm setup and imaging, I typically monitor my session over my iPad from bed. My PHD star movement alarm is the only thing I have to listen to. If anything goes wrong, that's my clue.

#11 mpgxsvcd

mpgxsvcd

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1949
  • Joined: 21 Dec 2011
  • Loc: Raleigh, North Carolina

Posted 02 May 2013 - 01:21 PM

I agree that built in WiFi would be nice, but I don't see mirrorless cameras operation being much different then DSLR's. You still have buttons, and relatively small screens. The benefit of the DSLR being slightly less noise. The benefit of the mirrorless being weight and size.

I don't find the viewfinder or the screen useful. I really do need to see my images on my laptop. I don't even think I'd be happy with an 11" laptop screen. With PHD, I have the laptop out there anyway, I might as well get the most out of it.

This morning, for example, I was shooting some flats for last nights session. I looked at the BYE screen and noticed one of my dust doughnuts was moving around with each exposure. I think it was dust, and was able to retake flats after tilting the tube differently; but if I had not noticed it, I wouldn't have any flats for my entire session. I never would have noticed that on the cameras LCD.

After I'm setup and imaging, I typically monitor my session over my iPad from bed. My PHD star movement alarm is the only thing I have to listen to. If anything goes wrong, that's my clue.


I haven’t tried this yet. However, there is a program that will not only let you get the camera’s live view onto a laptop but it will also allow you to control the camera. All of this is over wireless. The link below shows how it works.

http://www.personal-...h3-from-a-we...

This is basically like BackyardEOS without the wires. The nice thing is that these m4/3s cameras give you 3 options. You can use the LCD screen, use the EVF, or use a laptop/tablet. All of the solutions are wireless and you don’t have to choose any particular one. You can even switch back and forth.

#12 mpgxsvcd

mpgxsvcd

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1949
  • Joined: 21 Dec 2011
  • Loc: Raleigh, North Carolina

Posted 02 May 2013 - 01:27 PM

I agree that built in WiFi would be nice, but I don't see mirrorless cameras operation being much different then DSLR's. You still have buttons, and relatively small screens. The benefit of the DSLR being slightly less noise. The benefit of the mirrorless being weight and size.


There is a really big difference between live view modes. The mirrorless can use any shutter duration and ISO value for the live view. That is a HUGE difference.

Also the wireless control of the camera remedies needing to touch the scope/camera/mount.

The biggest problem is that people generalize DSLRs vs. Mirrorless. They always say that DSLRs automatically have lower noise and mirrorless are always smaller. My GH3 is about the same size as the smallest Canon DSLRs. However, it noise profile is better than any Canon APS-C camera ever made according to the test results.

http://www.dxomark.c...ompare-camer...

In the case of the newest mirrorless solutions they are almost always smaller than the Canon DSLRs and also offer better noise response. It really seems like Canon and its devote users are the only ones not willing to change. All of the newest Sony, Olympus, and Panasonic mirrorless solutions have surpassed all of the Canon APS-C solutions in pretty much every aspect over the last few months. Nikon is the only company that doesn't have a viable mirrorless solution now. However, their DSLRs are still king of the hill. :tonofbricks:

#13 Footbag

Footbag

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5762
  • Joined: 13 Apr 2009
  • Loc: Scranton, PA

Posted 02 May 2013 - 02:14 PM

For someone using it for video astronomy, shutter duration during live view may be nice. I think Canon offers that, BYE has it, but I rarely use it. I'm usually just looking for a single star and the diffraction spikes from the B-mask.

I like the wireless feature, but that seems to be coming on all cameras. Personally, I think every electronic device should have a built in WiFi web server.

Nikon really did bring their A-game with their newest round of sensors. Hopefully, Canon will respond accordingly.

I'd be interested in seeing some 5m darks from some of the mirrorless cameras. I'm a bigger sensor, bigger pixel guy, but cannot wait until the mirroless outperform the current gen of DSLR's. Of course, at that point, the DSLR's will dominate the future line of mirrorless.

#14 mpgxsvcd

mpgxsvcd

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1949
  • Joined: 21 Dec 2011
  • Loc: Raleigh, North Carolina

Posted 02 May 2013 - 02:27 PM

I'd be interested in seeing some 5m darks from some of the mirrorless cameras. I'm a bigger sensor, bigger pixel guy, but cannot wait until the mirroless outperform the current gen of DSLR's. Of course, at that point, the DSLR's will dominate the future line of mirrorless.


I think the Canon DSLR's are going to need a time machine then. The mirrorless cameras already dominate them. It all lies in the Sony sensor that they are all using now.

Panasonic claims it is using their own sensor. However, the GH3 produces an identical RAW image down to the pixels with the Olympus OMD E-M5. Olympus has already stated that they use a Sony sensor in their newest cameras. When Olympus started using the Sony sensors their camera's low light ratings leap frogged over Canon and come very close to the Sony and Nikon offerings now.

#15 Gary BEAL

Gary BEAL

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1559
  • Joined: 10 May 2003
  • Loc: New Zealand

Posted 02 May 2013 - 02:42 PM

And the Fuji X series, I use the X-Pro, great camera. Just the old fashioned with a cable release that gets me.
Gary

#16 Footbag

Footbag

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5762
  • Joined: 13 Apr 2009
  • Loc: Scranton, PA

Posted 02 May 2013 - 02:51 PM

What do 5m darks frames look like with your GH3? Any visible noise?

I know the CCD guys talk about "noise free" Sony sensors, of course they are cooling them. I'd have to suspect mirror less have a bit more thermal buildup, but maybe not.

#17 mpgxsvcd

mpgxsvcd

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1949
  • Joined: 21 Dec 2011
  • Loc: Raleigh, North Carolina

Posted 02 May 2013 - 03:53 PM

What do 5m darks frames look like with your GH3? Any visible noise?

I know the CCD guys talk about "noise free" Sony sensors, of course they are cooling them. I'd have to suspect mirror less have a bit more thermal buildup, but maybe not.


I can make some samples. What ISOs? ISO 6400 is the last true electrical ISO but ISO 1600 is probably the ideal. The GH3 that I have was specifically designed with thermal build up in mind because its video capabilities are so highly regarded. That being said nothing is going to beat a cooled unit especially in the hot humid south where I live.

I am messing with a truly unique feature that only the Panasonic GH3 has. It will allow me to do almost the entire DSS stacking process in camera with an unlimited number of ISO 1600 RAW images. It can do lights, darks, even flats all in camera and all with RAW files. It even has several different ways of combining the images and you can switch back and forth between the different ways in-between images.

The feature is called Multi Exposure. However, the manual hardly talks about it and what it does say is wrong. It is almost like they started to make the feature decided it was too complicated but didn't want to take it out completely so they just left it in and didn't mention it anywhere else.

The great thing is that the feature really does work you just have to figure out how to get it to work to use it.

Stacking on the computer will always be better. However, there is something to say for producing excellent images in camera or on a tablet screen that you normally wouldn't be able to see until after you got home the next day.

I haven't produced any AP photos using this method yet. That is because the only thing it won't do is align the images. I haven't been guiding so far so this stacking process was useless. However, I have my guide camera being delivered tomorrow. After the cloud god's think I have done sufficient penance I am going to try it out.

If if the in camera stacking process doesn't work out I should still be able to get the exact same if not better images than the Canon cameras get since ever test I have seen has rated the GH3 as a better high ISO camera than the Canon APS-C offerings.

#18 Footbag

Footbag

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5762
  • Joined: 13 Apr 2009
  • Loc: Scranton, PA

Posted 02 May 2013 - 04:17 PM

5m at iso1600 would be good. Just want to get an idea of how the noise would compare to my older XS.

#19 Sean Wood

Sean Wood

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 138
  • Joined: 19 Apr 2011
  • Loc: North Carolina

Posted 02 May 2013 - 07:57 PM

WOW.... didn't mean to throw gasoline on an embers fellas... *BLEEP*.

I appreciate the suggestions to "go big or go home" with getting the more expensive Canon DSLR or even the other suggestions... But we're missing the point here... $299 for a 20MP camera. Going all in isn't an option at this point. I'm "ballin' on a budget" to cite a youthful euphemism. A kid in college and a sophomore in HS. The budget is stretched thin these days. I'm just really looking to get started to see if imaging is something I'd even be remotely into.

If this isn't a good entry level option then what other options are there out there in the sub $300 range.. OTHER THAN A MEADE DSI?

As far as controlling the camera I was considering the Samsung control software or one of the various other camera control packages for android... Use my tablet.. Leave the back screen completely off(no cool down after centering) and use the tablet as the control unit. Plus most of these allow downloading the images directly to the android device as well so no worries about even having to touch the camera outside of the focusing process. Or at least that's my line of thought for now...

#20 Falcon-

Falcon-

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4869
  • Joined: 11 Sep 2009
  • Loc: Gambier Island, BC, Canada

Posted 02 May 2013 - 08:21 PM

I would say that the 20MP portion of the specs are really not all that important. It will be rather tricky to find a combo of excellent optics and good seeing to REALLY take advantage of all those pixels. Something like a T3/1100D is nearish your budget and a used XS/1000D or XSi/450D would be within it while still counting as the conventional-wisdom pick.

HOWEVER yes, that is a good price for a nice lightweight APSC sensor camera! My only worries would be that the control software you are talking about will let you do the max exposure times (would be no good if they could only do 30s exposures) or if the android-app control only downloaded JPEG rather then RAW. If those two concerns are met then yes, I agree with your line of thought.

#21 ccs_hello

ccs_hello

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6365
  • Joined: 03 Jul 2004

Posted 02 May 2013 - 09:46 PM

...I know the CCD guys talk about "noise free" Sony sensors, of course they are cooling them. ...

Don't know which thread you are referring to (the one in CCD imaging subforum on SONY CCD...?) SONY Semiconductor Business Unit has long discontinued APS-C sized CCD image sensors and everything in APS-C sized has now transitioned to CMOS image sensors.

Recent SONY APS-C sized CMOS image sensors are great sensors (except not yet being used in astroCCD imagers) used in few selected models of DSLRs and MILCs. (Few camera mfgs: SONY, Nikon, Pentax, ...) E.g., see this CN thread.
It is so good that the sensor's little brother (FourThirds sized) is being commissioned and used in selected Panny and Oly MILCs.

BTW, almost all camera mfgs establish product tiers. Fancy features are reserved for high end models for people willing to pay. Call it the beauty of capitalism.

Clear Skies!

ccs_hello

#22 Footbag

Footbag

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5762
  • Joined: 13 Apr 2009
  • Loc: Scranton, PA

Posted 02 May 2013 - 10:44 PM

...I know the CCD guys talk about "noise free" Sony sensors, of course they are cooling them. ...

Don't know which thread you are referring to (the one in CCD imaging subforum on SONY CCD...?) SONY Semiconductor Business Unit has long discontinued APS-C sized CCD image sensors and everything in APS-C sized has now transitioned to CMOS image sensors.


ccs_hello


No. Not APS-C sized sensors. That's one of the problems I've had in shopping for a CCD, go smaller then APS-C or spend $10k. The Sony ICX694 is one of the Sony's I'm referring to. Only problem for me is it's a bit small. DSLR users are spoiled with our large FOV's.

#23 mpgxsvcd

mpgxsvcd

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1949
  • Joined: 21 Dec 2011
  • Loc: Raleigh, North Carolina

Posted 03 May 2013 - 08:29 AM

WOW.... didn't mean to throw gasoline on an embers fellas... *BLEEP*.

I appreciate the suggestions to "go big or go home" with getting the more expensive Canon DSLR or even the other suggestions... But we're missing the point here... $299 for a 20MP camera.

As far as controlling the camera I was considering the Samsung control software or one of the various other camera control packages for android... Use my tablet.. Leave the back screen completely off(no cool down after centering) and use the tablet as the control unit. Plus most of these allow downloading the images directly to the android device as well so no worries about even having to touch the camera outside of the focusing process. Or at least that's my line of thought for now...


I think your first statement is a little misguided. You want less megapixels instead of more because the bigger the pixels are the more light each pixel can gather. Honestly 8 megapixels is plenty for AP. However, there aren't many DSLRs left now that only have 8 megapixels.

You can find a used camera from any manufacturer for less than $300. You can even get a really nice older Canon camera for less than $300 used if you are patient and shop around. However, there are also some other manufactures that you can get a brand new camera for under $300 if you don't want to buy used.

I think the main theme of this thread is that there are plenty of options out there for less than $300. Some definitely work, some may work, and some may not work. It is probably going to be completely up to you which route you choose.

#24 nofxrx

nofxrx

    Vendor (HyperCams & Mods)

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 5241
  • Joined: 12 Jul 2005
  • Loc: Palm Bay,Florida

Posted 03 May 2013 - 09:16 PM

I never said Canon was "the best"...just to be specific..

"Going big or going home" has nothing to do with spending massive amounts of $ on the "best"/newest Canon DSLR out there..

My real point is that even the "old" Canon XS/XSi is still a very formidable camera, vs even newer models, for AP..

If you want to go with a smaller sensor camera (M4/3,etc), that is fine! Do it!

It is just my experience that people tend to be much happier with their images AND the ease of use with the Canon brand.
Again...CURRENTLY.

So why go against the grain? or try something that is not PROVEN to perform in the field we are talking about..

It is your money, do whatever makes YOU happy :)



Also, not trying to throw gas on embers here...just giving my 2:penny:'s.. And I have used/owned/modified and worked with a LOT of people with a VERY wide range of cameras. ;)

On THIS forum, with THIS topic, I say go with the best Canon you can afford..
That is NOT me saying Canon is the best..that is me saying get the best model you can with the current budget you have.
If your budget does not allow for the camera you want, save up and just wait til you can afford it.
Of course, if you find something you want, whether Canon or not, GET IT! If that is what you want, why should we stop you?
Only you can answer what will make you happy ;)


appreciate the suggestions to "go big or go home" with getting the more expensive Canon DSLR or even the other suggestions... But we're missing the point here... $299 for a 20MP camera.

As far as controlling the camera I was considering the Samsung control software or one of the various other camera control packages for android... Use my tablet.. Leave the back screen completely off(no cool down after centering) and use the tablet as the control unit. Plus most of these allow downloading the images directly to the android device as well so no worries about even having to touch the camera outside of the focusing process. Or at least that's my line of thought for now...


I think your first statement is a little misguided. You want less megapixels instead of more because the bigger the pixels are the more light each pixel can gather. Honestly 8 megapixels is plenty for AP. However, there aren't many DSLRs left now that only have 8 megapixels.


Your advice here is somewhat true..but with newer tech it has been proven that we can have our cake and eat it too...meaning you can get 18Mp and still have a VERY sensitive camera with low noise.
NO, it is no substitute to an 6-8um pixel camera, but it still works, and that is all that matters.

Also, in EVERY form of photography it really makes no difference how MANY pixels are in a sensor(unless you print VERY large, like billboard large, like with the D800's 36Mp! lol). This is really only true with recent models (less than 2-3yrs old)..
What we really care about is the SIZE of the pixels and the SIZE of the sensor.
Would you rather have an 8Mp sensor from your iPhone, or an 18Mp APS-C or Full Frame sensor from a "REAL" camera?
I hope the answer to that is obvious :grin:

IMHO the only time "go big or go home" comes to Pixel and Sensor size. Other than that, everything else is secondary.

Again, IMHO, YMMV, my own 2:penny:'s, etc etc! :)

Cheers!

#25 fishonkevin

fishonkevin

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1767
  • Joined: 29 Apr 2007
  • Loc: Michigan

Posted 03 May 2013 - 09:51 PM

Please try to keep on topic, which is "Could the Samsung Nx1000 work fo astrophotography?"






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics