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The Field of View+

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#1 Douglas729

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 08:09 AM

The enhanced magnification of binoviewers has been well documented but my perception of 50 degree plossls behaving like 68 degree wide field eyepieces when using both eyes is still inexplicable to me

Is it simply a matter of my unique optical perception of all peripheral objects as a one-time basketball point guard or does everyone experience this?

#2 REC

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 08:21 AM

That was my first thought too when I got mine. Like with the moon, it looked bigger and I could see more of it then just one EP.

Bob

#3 Eddgie

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 08:38 AM

I find the magnification effect to be quite pronounced. When I look at a planet using one eye, them open the other, there is no doubt in my mind that the image appears larger.

But the apparent field of view thing is not to me the same, so this may vary more with individual observers.

When I started binoviewing, I was using my C14, and since I used that scope with Panoptics, when I started with the Hyperions, I was getting the same apparent field.

When I used the Binoviewers in the EdgeHD though, as compared to being so used to the Naglers, the field felt very restricted using Hyperions.

I use a pair of 40mm Plossls in my C14 when I need a big exit pupil, and once again, there is no mistaking that the aparrent field is only 44 degrees wide.

While I don't see the aparent field as being wider, I do have to say that it simply does not bother me as much when binoviewing.

And here is why I think this is the case.

When I binoview, I feel that the sensation of spatial depth (3D feeling) is only present when I look directly at the center or near the center of the field.

If I turn my eyes to the edge of the field, I don't seem to get that same sensation.

And I enjoy that characteristic of binoviewing (the sense of depth) so I tend to look more at the center of the field most of the time.

And when I do, I am not as conscious of the field stop of the eyepeice.

But unlike the magnificaiton illusion, I don't seem to see the apparent feild as being larger than it is.

I just seem more comfortable with accepting it.

But a few weeks ago, I had the binoviwers on my EdgeHD 8", and when I went to my 31mm Nagler, it was an "OMG, I forgot why I bought this telescope to begin with" moment. I had this beautiful, huge, brigtht apparent field filled with little pinpoint stars.

I have resolved to use the EdgeHD 8" more this year with Naglers in Monovision as a result.

My poor 6" APO has not been outside in almost a year now. So sad. But the C14 binoviewing has been most excellent.

#4 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 10:45 AM

The increase in signal to noise when going from the cyclopean squint to two eyes results in a gain in resolving power. Even considering the fact that a BV delivers a half-bright image to each eye, the integration of two images makes for a more 'definite' image which can result in the illusion of increased image scale.

Every now and again I will affirm for myself just how inferior a one-eyed view really is, by closing one eye or otherwise blocking one side. As soon as the other eye is added to the process, the immediate improvement is marked. As a result, I largely refuse to limit myself so needlessly to but one eye.

#5 Douglas729

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 02:36 PM

So Ed, have you pretty much narrowed your scope stable down to the incredible Edge HD 8" for the wider fov objects and the C14 for DSO's?

I currently have my Super C8+ plus mirror at OWL for re-coating but when it returns the new Carton 100mm is gonna be a tough contender as it likely best compliments my Ultima 11....I'd like to narrow down to 2 scopes and a C5

I'm not that accomplished that I require a half dozen scopes...but I have learned many a pro or con about each breed.

#6 Eddgie

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 08:25 PM

I wish.

I still have 5 telescopes.

ETX 90 that I use for spotting at the range.

C5 that I use for solar and birding.

6" APO that I use for doubles and wide fields.

EdgeHD 8" that I use mostly for "Quick Looks."

And the C14. The C14 is the scope that I use for the vast majority of my observing.

I could live without the rest. I need aperture more than I need anything else.

#7 Douglas729

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 06:04 AM

Choosing Just One Telescope (or why monogamy rhymes
with monotony).

May I say that for every person's unique persona and
interests we live in a Baskin-Robbins world with over
31 flavors of optical instruments from the under $500
beginner scopes (that now include the $350-500 used
C8 that retailed for $1300 in '85) to a SkyWatcher 120ED,
the cost of which is still within reach of the average consumer
when most other well constructed durable goods
have doubled or tripled in price.

A savvy well educated amateur astronomer can now find
almost anything he might desire in the pre-owned
marketplace of high-end telescopes for 2-$5000.

Our dilemma is trying to wade through a plethora of
price/performance options and find one telescope
which best fits all our needs like owning just one
pair of shoes be they oxfords, loafers or a pair beach sandals.

To each his own...or should we own one of each?
DG

#8 Eddgie

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 07:40 AM

We do live in a time where the avilability of used equipment makes owning a variety of scopes possible, though like anything, tastss vary to the degree that the total outlay could be from not much to quite a lot.

If I were doing it all over today (and I did not have this option two years ago), I would likely be using a 12" f/5 Go-To with refinished mirrors and high transmission coatings, and just leave it at that one scope.

And I still might do that.

I was out last night with my 6" APO. First time in maybe 6 months that I have used it.

It just seems very unrewarding to use to me anymore.

The field is very wide and is pinpoint to the field stop of my Naglers, but the apeture is just so small that I found myself bored quickly.

Saturn was so-so (I barlowed my binoviewers and that did not help.. In fact, I felt the image was way to dim to do good planetary observing in this scope with the binoviewers), and M5 and M3, which I had just viewed the night before with the C14 and Binoviewers were disappointing.

I did a few doubles and I put it away.

I am sure that it will get a bit more use during the summer when its wide field view becomes more rewarding, but I have been thinking of selling it. It is a lovely scope, but just too small for me to enjoy anymore.

The C14 is the only scope that really satisfies me anymore.

As much as I think about a big Go-To reflector, I still keep coming back to the C14. I just enjoy it so much more than anything else I have ever owned, and my sample has really nice optics, so performance has been really good.

And it binoviews so well. Something I have been concerned about with a big Go-To reflector is getting the binoviewers in a comfortable position. This continues to be one of the big reasons I love the C14 is that I can always find a comfortable seating position and rarely have to stand to view.


To your point though, thanks to the used market and the entry of the insatiable chineses industrial machine, it is now possible for us to all own several good quality instruments, each suited to our own needs an whims.

A good time to be an equipment junky for sure.

#9 faackanders2

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 07:15 PM

The increase in signal to noise when going from the cyclopean squint to two eyes results in a gain in resolving power. Even considering the fact that a BV delivers a half-bright image to each eye, the integration of two images makes for a more 'definite' image which can result in the illusion of increased image scale.

Every now and again I will affirm for myself just how inferior a one-eyed view really is, by closing one eye or otherwise blocking one side. As soon as the other eye is added to the process, the immediate improvement is marked. As a result, I largely refuse to limit myself so needlessly to but one eye.


Glen, since 100 AFOV eyepieces came out, I use these much more mono view, than binoview. Before 100 AFOV I preferred binoview with 24 panoptics, even though I had 82 AFOV mono capability. I now have 14mm 82 AFOV capability but I use these less than the wider 24mm 68 AFOV binoviewers.






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