Jump to content


Photo

Anyone has observed a supernova in action?

  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#1 Astrohat

Astrohat

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 172
  • Joined: 30 Apr 2013

Posted 07 May 2013 - 09:41 PM

Anyone has observed a supernova in action or any kind of activities in deep-space with their telescopes? Any has seen the comet hit Jupiter a few years ago?

#2 Astrojensen

Astrojensen

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5356
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2008
  • Loc: Bornholm, Denmark

Posted 08 May 2013 - 01:53 AM

Yes to both of the questions.


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#3 nytecam

nytecam

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11509
  • Joined: 20 Aug 2005
  • Loc: London UK

Posted 08 May 2013 - 04:36 AM

Anyone has observed a supernova in action or any kind of activities in deep-space with their telescopes? Any has seen the comet hit Jupiter a few years ago?

Action 'up there' ain't the same as action 'down here' mainly because of our ant-like scale and limited timeframe of life itself. You can see changes on the sun, rotation of Mars and Jupiter and their sats, comets aginst the background stars etc in a few minutes.

In deep-space the finite limit of light speed limits our perception of 'change' but one can get a snapshot, literally, as my pic of SN 2013ab in a Bootes galaxy below but the event took place 63 million years ago and the light from this event only arrived on earth last Febuary!

In the intervening millions of years surely hundreds more supernovae have exploded in this galaxy alone and their light from each event right now is winging its way across space towards us or future generations - big place ain't it :o

Attached Files



#4 Rich (RLTYS)

Rich (RLTYS)

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 5246
  • Joined: 18 Dec 2004
  • Loc: New York (Long Island)

Posted 08 May 2013 - 05:11 AM

Yes to both of the questions.


Ditto. You observe long enough it's surprising what you might see.

Rich (RLTYS)

#5 Tony Flanders

Tony Flanders

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11208
  • Joined: 18 May 2006
  • Loc: Cambridge, MA, USA

Posted 08 May 2013 - 06:20 AM

Anyone has observed a supernova in action?


Sure. There was an extraordinarily bright supernova in M101 last year, readily visible through backyard telescopes.

#6 MikeBOKC

MikeBOKC

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4598
  • Joined: 10 May 2010
  • Loc: Oklahoma City, OK

Posted 08 May 2013 - 07:32 AM

This site is continuoisly updated by the International Astronomical Union to list all currently visible supernovae, novae, comets, etc.:

http://www.cbat.eps.....edu/index.html

As you can see there are dozens of supernovae detected and labeled each year. Only a few (perhaps 3-5 a year) reach a magnitide that makes them readily visible in small or medium aperture scopes, though many make good photographic targets with long exposures. Every few years there is a truly bright one, in the high single or low double digits in magnitude. Supernovae peak fairly quickly in brightness after discovery and then stay somewhat constant for several weeks before fading. They are among my favorite targets, and like many I check this site several times a week to keep up with recent discoveries.

#7 JasonBurry

JasonBurry

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 377
  • Joined: 27 Apr 2012
  • Loc: Cape Spencer, NB, Canada

Posted 08 May 2013 - 07:44 AM

And M95 had a nice supernova last March too. Watched it all last spring/early summer. This spring, it was no longer visible.

Sadly, no to the comet impact on Jupiter - predates my observing.

In addition, there are a large number of variable stars that can be observed changing in brightness via amateur telescopes, with periods ranging from hours or days to years. Some quasars are also variable and within reach of larger backyard scopes.

There's ALOT going on out there... And those tiny changes are some of the basis of much of our knowledge about our universe. For example, some variable stars and supernovae types are used to establish distances and measure the expansion of the universe. Variability of AGN's (Quasars) put limits on the maximum size of the compact objects that power them (black holes).

For the most part, the changes are pretty subtle. But in time, they begin to appear to those who seek.

J

#8 GlennLeDrew

GlennLeDrew

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 10847
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2008
  • Loc: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Posted 08 May 2013 - 01:36 PM

I had the good fortune to catch SN1987a in the LMC at peak brightness (3rd magnitude) as well as the after-impact splotches of SL-9 on Jupiter.

#9 Achernar

Achernar

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 9126
  • Joined: 25 Feb 2006
  • Loc: Mobile, Alabama, USA

Posted 08 May 2013 - 01:39 PM

I've seen the aftermath of both the ShoemakerLevy comet impact as well as the impact of a small asteroid with Jupiter in 1994 and 2009. ShoemakerLEvy-9 left scars big enough to be seen with any telescope, my 6-inch showed details in each one. The black cloud created by the asteroid hitting the planet in 2009 was a small, oblong ink spot on the otherwise shining face of Jupiter. It was quite easy to see for a while with a 10-inch. As for supernovae, I have observed at least a dozen of those, all in relatively nearby galaxies. I have a large enough telescope to see supernovae hundreds of millions of light years away, but I have yet to have an opportunity to observe from sites dark enough for them. A supernova in another galaxy simply appears as another star that was not there before. The brightest supernovae I have ever seen were the ones that erupted in M-81 back in 1993 and M-101 in 2011. In 2012 ther was one in M-95 I actually saw from my front yard along with the galaxy, with a street light 50 yards away. You can find out about supernovae that are underway right now at the link below.

http://www.rochester.../supernova.html

Taras

#10 hbanich

hbanich

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1113
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2005
  • Loc: Portland, Oregon

Posted 08 May 2013 - 04:05 PM

Anyone has observed a supernova in action?


Sure. There was an extraordinarily bright supernova in M101 last year, readily visible through backyard telescopes.


Astrohat, a bunch of observers at the Oregon Star Party saw the M101 supernova through 7x50 binoculars - it wasn't obvious but it was visible. But watching it brighten and then fade though a telescope was much more enjoyable because it was bright enough at its peak to see even in a moderately light polluted sky.

However, do you mean has any one seen a supernova's initial explosion, so that where there was nothing visible a star suddenly appeared? If so, I don't know if that's ever happened. It would be wonderfully cool though.

I saw the SL-9 impacts on Jupiter, which was really exciting. Every evening new impact sites appeared and the old ones changed, plus they looked just as impressive through an 8 inch scope as they did in a 20 inch.

#11 StarmanDan

StarmanDan

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3765
  • Joined: 27 Aug 2007
  • Loc: Deep in the heart of Texas

Posted 08 May 2013 - 09:47 PM

Our club does a lot of photometry at our observatory. One time we were observing a white dwarf which varies very minutely in a matter of seconds. We were doing live reduction watching the light curve form when we noticed one of the comparison stars suddenly brighten over the course of an hour then fade over many hours. Turns out we had "discovered" a cataclysmic variable that had only been observed in outburst a few times in the history of the AAVSO.

#12 azure1961p

azure1961p

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 10430
  • Joined: 17 Jan 2009
  • Loc: USA

Posted 09 May 2013 - 12:36 PM

Yes. Its fairly common. Not crazy so, but now and again. Usually in Messier galaxies for me though all galaxies have them sooner or later. It is particularly interesting to see a lone star come fourth out of the distant galactic haze - albeit , eruptively so.

Pete

#13 RAKing

RAKing

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6304
  • Joined: 28 Dec 2007
  • Loc: West of the D.C. Nebula

Posted 13 May 2013 - 11:36 AM

I watched the supernova in M101 last year and measured the brightness for AAVSO for a month or so.

I did not see the comet hit Jupiter, but saw the scar it left the next day.

I have also seen SS Cygni "erupt". About every 50 days, it goes from a quiet mag 12 star to a much brighter mag 7.7 or so. If you hit it just right, you can see it happening. It's one of the most watched variable stars in the AAVSO database - I guess we all like to watch it in action. Kind of like watching Old Faithful erupt. :)

Cheers,

Ron

#14 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 36433
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 17 May 2013 - 09:38 PM

Anyone has observed a supernova in action?


Sure. There was an extraordinarily bright supernova in M101 last year, readily visible through backyard telescopes.


I was able to see SN 2011fe in M101 with a 10x50 Celestron binocular. I've logged dozens of other supernovae through the years, using a variety of telescopes ranging from a 101mm refractor to 20-inch plus Dobs.

The weather was absolutely terrible after the Comet Shoemaker–Levy 9 impacts in 1994 but I was able to see some of the impact scars and got a few not-so-great film photographs.

I'm attaching my Bradford Robotic Telescope image of the recent supernova in M65.

Dave Mitsky

SN 2013am in M65
4/9/2013
14" f/11 Celestron C14 SCT working at f/5.3
FLI MicroLine CCD camera
110 seconds
Bradford Robotic Telescope
http://www.telescope.org/
Tenerife, the Canary Islands

#15 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 36433
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 17 May 2013 - 09:50 PM

Two of the impact scars can be seen, just barely, at the top of this eyepiece projection photograph of Jupiter that I took using the ASH 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain and a Pentax K1000 SLR film camera. The scars are easier to see in monochrome.

Dave Mitsky

Attached Files



#16 youngamateur42

youngamateur42

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1855
  • Joined: 21 Nov 2012
  • Loc: La Verne, CA

Posted 21 May 2013 - 05:00 PM

anyone remember the m51 supernova in 2011??

#17 Niels2011

Niels2011

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 125
  • Joined: 09 Jun 2011
  • Loc: UK

Posted 21 May 2013 - 05:23 PM

anyone remember the m51 supernova in 2011??


Yes I remember it very well - my first supernova. Here's my (really scrappy) observing note and even scrappier record sketch showing the location in relation to M51 and its companion and a couple of foreground stars. I hope I got this right, but if anyone knows better I hope they will correct me.

Attached Files



#18 Niels2011

Niels2011

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 125
  • Joined: 09 Jun 2011
  • Loc: UK

Posted 21 May 2013 - 05:29 PM

...that was on 8th June at 11.30pm, with very good transparency, moderate seeing, NELM c.5.25, though moon was in its first quarter, day 6 or 7. My notes record I saw it part of the time with averted vision @142x (7mm), perhaps glimpsed with direct vision, and at 250x (4mm) saw it with 100% with averted vision and maybe 50% with direct vision.

#19 timokarhula

timokarhula

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 251
  • Joined: 30 Jan 2006
  • Loc: Sweden

Posted 22 May 2013 - 07:51 AM

anyone remember the m51 supernova in 2011??


No, but I remember SN1994I and SN2005cs in M51. It is the only galaxy where I have seen two supernovae. The supernova in 2011 blew up in June when the nights are too bright.

/Timo Karhula

#20 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 36433
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 22 May 2013 - 09:55 PM

I observed all three of the "recent" supernovae in M51.

http://apod.nasa.gov...d/ap110605.html

Dave Mitsky

#21 Laurent Ferrero

Laurent Ferrero

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 40
  • Joined: 28 Dec 2012
  • Loc: Marseilles, France

Posted 29 May 2013 - 05:00 PM

I observed the supernova in M95 last year, it was easy to perceive because it was far enough from the core and the disk.

http://ekladata.com/...essins ciel%...

I could see the impact marks on Jupiter in 1994 when I was a young amateur astronomer beginner. I made drawings with my old 114/900 mm :

http://splendeursduc...crase-sur-ju...

This is good memories !

#22 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 36433
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 30 May 2013 - 11:58 AM

Here's my image of SN 2012aw.

Dave Mitsky

M95 and SN 2012aw
5/22/2012
14" f/11 Celestron C14 SCT working at f/5.3
FLI MicroLine CCD camera
35 seconds
Bradford Robotic Telescope
http://www.telescope.org/
Tenerife, the Canary Islands

Attached Files



#23 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 36433
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 31 May 2013 - 03:25 PM

SN 2011fe was the subject of today's episode of Stardate.

http://stardate.org/...gram/2013-05-31

Dave Mitsky






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics