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Sky Atlas for Small Telescopes & Binoculars

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#1 GeneT

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 07:59 PM

I use a variety of sky charts and atlases when viewing. I wanted something in between a planisphere and my Sky Atlas 2000 field charts, Wil Tirion atlases, and others. I recently bought 'Sky Atlas for Small Telescopes and Binoculars' by David and Billie Chandler. It shows the charts on a single page similar to Norton's. However Norton's has each chart spread over two pages. On the back page, Sky Atlas gives a listing for objects that can be seen in telescopes ranging in size from 2-4 inches. I purchased two copies and had Kinkos cut the binding off. I put the pages in plastic sheets, and in my binder. I now can eyeball the planisphere, then check out a page in the Sky Atlas, then move to more complicated star maps and charts. The Sky atlas is not too detailed, but detailed enough. This works nicely as a nicely two step approach. Sky Atlas for Small Telescopes and Binoculars is a nice segue from a planisphere to more detailed and complex star charts.

#2 Rick Woods

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 11:36 AM

That's the niche that Tirion's "Bright Star Atlas 2000" fills for me.

#3 LivingNDixie

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 02:43 PM

Pocket Sky Atlas is what I use. Great little book.

#4 edwincjones

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 02:50 PM

DeepMap600 initially
SA2000 for more detail

edj

#5 Rick Woods

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 04:46 PM

Gene, was the Sky Atlas expensive?

#6 turtle86

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 06:40 PM

Pocket Sky Atlas is what I use. Great little book.


+1 Just want to add that I also find it plenty helpful with my 18" scope, not just my smaller scope and binoculars.

Objects in the Heavens is another great little book to have handy.

#7 GeneT

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 09:00 PM

Gene, was the Sky Atlas expensive?

Very inexpensive. I bought it from Orion. I use it to rough out a section of the sky, then drill in with a variety of charts and atlases.

#8 LivingNDixie

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 09:46 AM

DeepMap600 initially
SA2000 for more detail

edj


I always hear good things about the Deep Map 600.

#9 GeneT

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 03:52 PM

That's the niche that Tirion's "Bright Star Atlas 2000" fills for me.


I have this too. I have a binder with several of these type of atlases. I think of it this way. When do you start with a 31 Nagler, then to a 22, a 17 and so on? I rarely start with a 17. The Sky Atlas for Small Telescopes and Binoculars is analogous to the 31 Nagler. I like the wide view of the sky it gives. I then drill down to Tiron's works, the Pocket Sky Atlas, and my Sky Atlas 2000.

#10 FJA

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 04:25 PM

Pocket Sky Atlas is what I use. Great little book.


Same here. Also the Cambridge Star Atlas which I've had since I started in astronomy; it's bent (a trip to Australia in 1997 saw it stuffed in my rucksack and bent out of shape!), dog-eared, written on and mouldy from dew but I still have it and it's got a special place in my affections.

#11 blb

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 06:18 PM

Pocket Sky Atlas is what I use. Great little book.

Same here for me too. The PSA shows all the stars I can see with my 10x50 binoculars in my light polluted skies and from a dark sky site it shows me enough stars to find all the DSO's I can see with the binoculars.

#12 GeneT

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 08:14 PM

I also have and use the items mentioned in this post. What I like about Sky Atlas for Small Telescopes is that it sets the stage for Tiron, Pocket Sky Atlas, Sky Atlas 2000 and others.

#13 RichardHK

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 05:12 AM

Pocket Sky Atlas is what I use. Great little book.


+1 on that book. Easy to read and use, compact, and perfect for taking everywhere.

#14 jrbarnett

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 10:10 AM

Back when I had a steel-tubed Dob I cut up a Deep Map 600 into seasonal segments, backed it with adhesive sided magnetic vinyl sheeting and had a star chart that affixed to the OTA for quick reference while star hopping. Look at chart, look in finder, look back at chart, look in finder, look in eyepiece voila! :grin:

- Jim

#15 TomCorbett

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 12:13 AM

Back when I had a steel-tubed Dob I cut up a Deep Map 600 into seasonal segments, backed it with adhesive sided magnetic vinyl sheeting and had a star chart that affixed to the OTA for quick reference while star hopping. Look at chart, look in finder, look back at chart, look in finder, look in eyepiece voila!

- Jim




Jim...

Most creative!

#16 TomCorbett

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 12:48 AM

Sky Atlas for Small Telescopes and Binoculars' by David and Billie Chandler



I also like the Milky Way map (figure 1) and our Solar System position map for the Milky Way (figure 2) in Chandler's Sky Atlas.

Most beginners would get a jump start on observing by starting with Chandler's First Light Astronomy Kit and easy-to-hold cheap medium binoculars (7x35 or 8x42). My humble opinion is to get the Chandler items before buying the "serious" stuff--scope, eyepieces, mount, full size atlas(es), guidebooks, handbooks, software, and magazine subscriptions.

*****

Another first-stop for beginners is the Edmund Mag 5 Star Atlas from Edmund Scientifics. Yes, this golden oldie in comic book style is still being sold!






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