Jump to content


Photo

Roofing material and construction:

  • Please log in to reply
49 replies to this topic

#26 PhaedrusUpshaw

PhaedrusUpshaw

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 206
  • Joined: 21 Apr 2012
  • Loc: Southwestern Indiana

Posted 22 May 2013 - 11:41 PM

Here's a cropped image of the Kynar-painted metal roof (which provides the look of new copper).

EDITED: These are Classic Batten Panels made by Coastal Metal Service. The color is Classic Copper (a "cool" color). From their website:

"CLASSIC BATTEN® panels are available in all of our unique COLOR LOC® Kynar 500®/Hylar 5000® painted 24 gauge steel and selected aluminum paint colors."

I installed the panels myself, and after having done it once, I now know much better how to do it. It looks fine, but I would crimp the panel ends (the ends that face you, not the standing seam ends, which click together) when it's warm out (it's hard to bend cold metal). Also, I mistakenly cut the Z-channel that keeps driving rain from coming in the top of the roof (where the panels meet the cap) into a lot of small pieces instead of simply cutting as one piece to the length of the roof (that's what happens when you're cold and tired).

This roof is a few years old and still looks new.


JKK, The copper is a classic look, thanks for the photograph and thanks for the tips.
Clear skies,
Bill

#27 PhaedrusUpshaw

PhaedrusUpshaw

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 206
  • Joined: 21 Apr 2012
  • Loc: Southwestern Indiana

Posted 22 May 2013 - 11:46 PM

Aluminium roofing can be ordered from lumber yards, though I agree that it might not repel hail as well.... the steel panels are tempered or hardened somewhat, so as to resist denting. The steel ones aren't hard to handle - I've put up 18' panels by myself, but I will admit that I've installed perhaps 30 metal roofs, so I will try things that might intimidate hobby builders....
a few tricks of installing:
If you pay real close attention to purlin spacing, you can pre-drill a whole side's supply of panels at once. (I always pre-drill, it makes installing the screws a whole lot easier) Lift (not slide) the panels off the stack, to avoid scratches from metal shavings between layers.

Don't use the torque control on your cordless, a knot or hard place will release before the screw is tight, and it'll leak....tighten each screw by eye, looking for the beginning of neoprene washer bulge.
A stop-block fabricated to support the panel at the bottom edge with just the right overhang makes life a lot easier, especially on steeper roofs.
A pair of vise-grip pliers clamped on the top edge of the panel makes towing the sheet up the roof possible.
I use metal-cutting blades in a 4" angle grinder to cut panels, it's noisy, sparks and shrapnel fly out (protect your eyes and ears....) and you usually have to clean up the rough edges with a file or sander.... but it's the fastest way.....

In cooler climates, a layer of thin ply on the rafters and under the purlins will stop condensation from forming on - and dripping from....the panels.
R

Thank for the advice Roscoe, especially the thin ply to stop condensation from dripping off the panels.
Clear skies,
Bill

#28 JJK

JJK

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1848
  • Joined: 27 Apr 2008

Posted 23 May 2013 - 12:43 AM

Here's a cropped image of the Kynar-painted metal roof (which provides the look of new copper).

EDITED: These are Classic Batten Panels made by Coastal Metal Service. The color is Classic Copper (a "cool" color). From their website:

"CLASSIC BATTEN® panels are available in all of our unique COLOR LOC® Kynar 500®/Hylar 5000® painted 24 gauge steel and selected aluminum paint colors."

I installed the panels myself, and after having done it once, I now know much better how to do it. It looks fine, but I would crimp the panel ends (the ends that face you, not the standing seam ends, which click together) when it's warm out (it's hard to bend cold metal). Also, I mistakenly cut the Z-channel that keeps driving rain from coming in the top of the roof (where the panels meet the cap) into a lot of small pieces instead of simply cutting as one piece to the length of the roof (that's what happens when you're cold and tired).

This roof is a few years old and still looks new.


JKK, The copper is a classic look, thanks for the photograph and thanks for the tips.
Clear skies,
Bill


My pleasure.

#29 stmguy

stmguy

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 326
  • Joined: 11 Oct 2012
  • Loc: Western NH

Posted 23 May 2013 - 06:21 AM

I went in and talked with the contractor specialist and he was a huge help as he helped me save some money as well as all the little things I didn't know about like the foam pieces that seal up the underside from bugs getting in there, the ridge cap , longer screws needed for ridge cap etc
Norm

#30 stmguy

stmguy

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 326
  • Joined: 11 Oct 2012
  • Loc: Western NH

Posted 23 May 2013 - 06:35 AM

If I were to do it again I might have tried to do the standing seam as HD has that also

Norm

Attached Files



#31 PhaedrusUpshaw

PhaedrusUpshaw

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 206
  • Joined: 21 Apr 2012
  • Loc: Southwestern Indiana

Posted 23 May 2013 - 09:38 AM

I went in and talked with the contractor specialist and he was a huge help as he helped me save some money as well as all the little things I didn't know about like the foam pieces that seal up the underside from bugs getting in there, the ridge cap , longer screws needed for ridge cap etc
Norm

Thanks Norm, that is a part of my plan I am implementing today. I certainly do appreciate all the good tips.
Clear skies,
Bill

#32 PhaedrusUpshaw

PhaedrusUpshaw

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 206
  • Joined: 21 Apr 2012
  • Loc: Southwestern Indiana

Posted 23 May 2013 - 09:45 AM

If I were to do it again I might have tried to do the standing seam as HD has that also

Norm

Quite an impressive Observatory there Norm, thanks for the photograph.
Clear skies,
Bill

#33 roscoe

roscoe

    curmudgeon

  • *****
  • Posts: 3279
  • Joined: 04 Feb 2009
  • Loc: NW Mass, inches from VT

Posted 23 May 2013 - 10:06 AM

I went in and talked with the contractor specialist and he was a huge help as he helped me save some money as well as all the little things I didn't know about like the foam pieces that seal up the underside from bugs getting in there, the ridge cap , longer screws needed for ridge cap etc
Norm


And there is also a strip of black stuff about an inch thick and 3" wide that looks sorta like a green scrubber-pad that is made to go under the ridge cap to allow ventilation but block out bugs......
R

#34 stmguy

stmguy

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 326
  • Joined: 11 Oct 2012
  • Loc: Western NH

Posted 23 May 2013 - 10:51 AM

Thanks for the kind words, what you might not know is that the roof rotates :)

https://picasaweb.go...825609433846...

Attached Files



#35 PhaedrusUpshaw

PhaedrusUpshaw

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 206
  • Joined: 21 Apr 2012
  • Loc: Southwestern Indiana

Posted 23 May 2013 - 03:18 PM

Thanks for the kind words, what you might not know is that the roof rotates :)

https://picasaweb.go...825609433846...

Quite an engineering masterpiece, I must say I wondered when I saw the first photograph!

#36 Raginar

Raginar

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6138
  • Joined: 19 Oct 2010
  • Loc: Rapid CIty, SD

Posted 24 May 2013 - 09:49 AM

Norm, I hate you :D I wish I'd thought to have Home Depot do that for me!

Good idea.

#37 PhaedrusUpshaw

PhaedrusUpshaw

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 206
  • Joined: 21 Apr 2012
  • Loc: Southwestern Indiana

Posted 24 May 2013 - 05:33 PM

Norm, I hate you :D I wish I'd thought to have Home Depot do that for me!
Good idea.

Raginar,
I have just today shopped Menard's, Lowe's and Home Depot for my metal roofing materials and HD was the only one who provided panels cut to order and I was told they would price match any other outlet including my 10% Lowe's military discount. So one needs not think to long or hard about where to order his roofing materials. I suppose you will dislike me a great deal also, however I will have to endure...
Clear skies,
Bill

#38 roscoe

roscoe

    curmudgeon

  • *****
  • Posts: 3279
  • Joined: 04 Feb 2009
  • Loc: NW Mass, inches from VT

Posted 24 May 2013 - 06:32 PM

Jus' sayin'.....most any 'local' lumber yard can order your roof cut to length, will deliver it (often free), and will be likely to already have a price comparable to the big-box, and equally likely to match it if they aren't already cheaper....
Russ

#39 PhaedrusUpshaw

PhaedrusUpshaw

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 206
  • Joined: 21 Apr 2012
  • Loc: Southwestern Indiana

Posted 09 June 2013 - 08:06 AM

I got my metal roof panels from Home Depot , they cut them to the inch , no extra charge . If you go with Home Depot order the screws at the same time , for some reason they are double the cost in the store
Norm

Norm,
I ordered my white roof panels from Home Depot and got them cut to my specific dimensions. I received them in less than a week and plan on installing the roof this coming week, weather permitting. I will post a photo when completed. I want to thank everyone who posted to this thread; your assistance was invaluable.
Clear skies and of course as Jack would say, “Keep looking up!”
Bill

#40 tim57064

tim57064

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1475
  • Joined: 23 Aug 2012
  • Loc: Southeast South Dakota,USA

Posted 09 June 2013 - 08:45 AM

We will all be waiting in anticipation to see your pic's of your progress. If you can,post numerous images of the steps you take. Wishing Clear Skies for you as we have been in clouds and rain for too long.

#41 PhaedrusUpshaw

PhaedrusUpshaw

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 206
  • Joined: 21 Apr 2012
  • Loc: Southwestern Indiana

Posted 09 June 2013 - 09:24 AM

We will all be waiting in anticipation to see your pic's of your progress. If you can,post numerous images of the steps you take. Wishing Clear Skies for you as we have been in clouds and rain for too long.

Amen to the clouds and will do regarding the posting of the photographs.
Clear skies,
Bill

#42 roscoe

roscoe

    curmudgeon

  • *****
  • Posts: 3279
  • Joined: 04 Feb 2009
  • Loc: NW Mass, inches from VT

Posted 09 June 2013 - 11:50 AM

I ordered my white roof panels from Home Depot and got them cut to my specific dimensions. I received them in less than a week


Did they deliver them? HD does not deliver around here.....

R

#43 PhaedrusUpshaw

PhaedrusUpshaw

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 206
  • Joined: 21 Apr 2012
  • Loc: Southwestern Indiana

Posted 09 June 2013 - 12:29 PM

I ordered my white roof panels from Home Depot and got them cut to my specific dimensions. I received them in less than a week


Did they deliver them? HD does not deliver around here.....

No, I had to pick them up at their store.
Clear skies,
Bill

R



#44 MRBILL0

MRBILL0

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 238
  • Joined: 17 Jan 2013
  • Loc: Los Angeles, CA

Posted 23 June 2013 - 10:38 AM

Bill,

Quite a fertile post on your observatory. I offer these 3 tips: 1) your deck framing has double "X" braces only on the ends, you should have them also on the long sides. 2) Standing seam would probably be the best choice. 3) In southern Indiana, snow can be a problem. I would recommend a steep roof pitch, like 6:12 (6" height for each 12" on the base). I am going to guess that your garage in your 1st picture is about 3:12.

The ARP Guy
Bill Pickard

"The difference between Stupidity and Genius, Genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

Attached Files



#45 PhaedrusUpshaw

PhaedrusUpshaw

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 206
  • Joined: 21 Apr 2012
  • Loc: Southwestern Indiana

Posted 24 June 2013 - 12:56 AM

Bill,

Quite a fertile post on your observatory. I offer these 3 tips: 1) your deck framing has double "X" braces only on the ends, you should have them also on the long sides. 2) Standing seam would probably be the best choice. 3) In southern Indiana, snow can be a problem. I would recommend a steep roof pitch, like 6:12 (6" height for each 12" on the base). I am going to guess that your garage in your 1st picture is about 3:12.

The ARP Guy
Bill Pickard

"The difference between Stupidity and Genius, Genius has its limits." Albert Einstein


Thank you Bill, I have compensated for the lack of “X” braces along the sides of the decking by using metal banding inside the actual building, which has worked out quite well. I used a 4:12 pitch, which was twice as high as the metal roof manufacture recommended, they are based in southern Indian and are familiar with existing conditions in this area. I am now in the process of designing a winch and pulley system to open and close the roof. I am leaning toward a hand crank boat winch, however any suggestions would be greatly appreciated most especially a simple diagram laying out the pulley configuration. I am very grateful to each one of the members who have taken the time to post to this thread, all of the suggestions have been considered and a vast number of them have been incorporated into my design.
Clear skies to all and of course, “Keep looking up!”
Bill

#46 PhaedrusUpshaw

PhaedrusUpshaw

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 206
  • Joined: 21 Apr 2012
  • Loc: Southwestern Indiana

Posted 24 June 2013 - 01:24 AM

I just today finished with the exterior paneling and I am in the process of designing the winch and pulley mechanism to operate the roof. I certainty would appreciate any suggestions, especially simple diagrams of pulley systems. This project has been a very rewarding experience and I am starting to see a bit of light at the end of the tunnel. More photos to follow. Thank you ever so much to every one who has posted to this "fertile" thread as MR BILL put it.
Clear skies to all and of course "Keep looking up!"

Attached Files



#47 MRBILL0

MRBILL0

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 238
  • Joined: 17 Jan 2013
  • Loc: Los Angeles, CA

Posted 24 June 2013 - 08:29 AM

Bill,
Looks like you are making good progress. Some observations:

1. In building, shear is resistance to lateral forces. In California, we are concerned about earthquakes. In Indiana I think your concern is winds. Your are providing shear to the building with the plywood siding. But the only shear on the deck framing are the front-to-back diagonals. There is no resistance to lateral forces left-to-right. You have provided temporary diagonal braces left-to-right to the roof track and permanent diagonals front-to-back. I would recommend permanent diagonals left-to-right on both the roof track and the 6x6 posts. You will have a substantial amount of weight from the deck up which will make the structure "Top-Heavy". A big wind could provide you with a lot of firewood.

2. A boat winch is a great idea especially with the twin-ratio they provide. Perhaps 2 will be needed: open/close(?). The main concern is reduction of friction rather than pulling power. Perhaps a gloss-powdercoated steel C-Channel on each track with (3) 4" poly ball-bearing wheels on each side (in-line, not swivel) would provide very easy movement. You could even install windshield wipers in front of the wheels to clear the snow on the track :)

3. Standing-seam mfgrs would recommend 2:12 as the MINIMUM slope to prevent water intrusion. 4:12 should be sufficient as the area is maybe 96 sq ft (8'x12')

4. Have you provided power? Coffee maker? Heater?

Looks great.

Bill Pickard

"The difference between Stupidity and Genius, Genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

#48 PhaedrusUpshaw

PhaedrusUpshaw

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 206
  • Joined: 21 Apr 2012
  • Loc: Southwestern Indiana

Posted 24 June 2013 - 09:57 AM

Bill,
Looks like you are making good progress. Some observations:

1. In building, shear is resistance to lateral forces. In California, we are concerned about earthquakes. In Indiana I think your concern is winds. Your are providing shear to the building with the plywood siding. But the only shear on the deck framing are the front-to-back diagonals. There is no resistance to lateral forces left-to-right. You have provided temporary diagonal braces left-to-right to the roof track and permanent diagonals front-to-back. I would recommend permanent diagonals left-to-right on both the roof track and the 6x6 posts. You will have a substantial amount of weight from the deck up which will make the structure "Top-Heavy". A big wind could provide you with a lot of firewood.

2. A boat winch is a great idea especially with the twin-ratio they provide. Perhaps 2 will be needed: open/close(?). The main concern is reduction of friction rather than pulling power. Perhaps a gloss-powdercoated steel C-Channel on each track with (3) 4" poly ball-bearing wheels on each side (in-line, not swivel) would provide very easy movement. You could even install windshield wipers in front of the wheels to clear the snow on the track :)

3. Standing-seam mfgrs would recommend 2:12 as the MINIMUM slope to prevent water intrusion. 4:12 should be sufficient as the area is maybe 96 sq ft (8'x12')

4. Have you provided power? Coffee maker? Heater?

Looks great.

Bill Pickard

"The difference between Stupidity and Genius, Genius has its limits." Albert Einstein


Bill,
Thank you once again for the excellent suggestions. Once I started nailing up the siding my main concern has been to prevent the framing and floor from getting water logged, we have been experiencing a quite a bit of rain here in southern Indiana. Now that I have a watertight building my attention is turned toward finishing the supporting braces both for the deck and roof track. Diagonal braces for both are in the plan and I just need to settle on the exact detail regarding these supports; combating lateral shear from side to side is the primary objective. Did I mention I am designing as I go?

I am still in the design phase regarding the winch and pulley setup and would invite any suggestions regarding same. I do have C-Channel tracks installed, which have been primed, painted, and dry lubed.

I installed 5 each 3-inch inline casters on each side and lubricated them as well. I smiled at the windshield wiper suggestion. I will be installing heat tape to keep the tracks clear of ice and snow this winter.

My plan includes a small breaker box with 110-volt AC power as well as 12 volt DC battery and trickle charger. I have made provisions for both a ventilating fan and small air conditioner. The ac thermostat will be set at approximately 100 degrees to help keep from frying the computers and other electronic equipment; summer gets hot here in southern Indiana.

Regarding the coffee maker, I'm thinking ESPRESSO!

Thank you once again to everyone who has contributed to this thread.

Clear skies to all and of course, “Keep looking up!”
Bill

#49 PhaedrusUpshaw

PhaedrusUpshaw

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 206
  • Joined: 21 Apr 2012
  • Loc: Southwestern Indiana

Posted 24 June 2013 - 10:08 AM

Did someone mention Espresso???

Attached Files



#50 MRBILL0

MRBILL0

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 238
  • Joined: 17 Jan 2013
  • Loc: Los Angeles, CA

Posted 24 June 2013 - 03:39 PM

Diagonal braces for both are in the plan and I just need to settle on the exact detail regarding these supports; combating lateral shear from side to side is the primary objective


Bill,

Since you have 3 posts left-to-right, you can use treated 2x6 in the form of a "K": bottom left to top-center, top-center to bottom right. Do this in both the front and back. Use 3~4 Simpson 4" SDS screws for the ends of each 2x6. SDS screws are self-drilling and set with a 3/8" hex driver. I would recommend Hot-Dipped-Galvanized. Here is the SDS spec sheet:

http://www.strongtie...nectors/SDS.asp

Bill Pickard

"The difference between Stupidity and Genius, Genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

Attached Files








Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics