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First time Antares split

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#1 Schaden

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 10:44 AM

I tried a few weeks ago and could see the B star's light around the edge of Antares' glare, but last night I got a clean split. It was my first time. My diagonal reverses left to right, and it was just where I'd seen a hint of it before. At about the "10 o'clock" position. I had read some see it as green but to me, it was definitely bluish white. At 360x you could have driven a truck between them, at 180x it was still distinct. I think seeing was about an 8/10 Pickering.

Double stars are cool. :cool:

#2 C_Moon

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 10:48 AM

Congrats! I've always seen the companion as having a bluish tint as well.

#3 Nucleophile

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 10:51 AM

congrats from here as well. now that you have seen it once, you will see again given good conditions.

In my hands, the secondary is greenish. I always find this target is a good indicator of seeing conditions.

#4 Bill Boublitz

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 11:42 AM

Congrats indeed. My first Antares split was a thrill. I also see it as more green.

#5 Bonco

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 02:44 PM

Nice report. The secondary of Antares has always looked greenish to me.
Bill

#6 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 07:01 AM

I've always seen the companion to Antares as a warm green color. I took me years to finally split this double but once I knew what to look for splitting Antares became fairly easy.

Rich (RLTYS)

#7 Schaden

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 11:46 AM

Thanks for the feedback everyone.

#8 azure1961p

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 07:51 AM

Nice report. I just may finally try for this one again. I barely try this one though and Sirius the same as the seeing , particularly for Sirius is usually not nearly good enough. I want to see if I can't ace out Sntares though in steadier summer seeing.

Congrats here. The glare off that primary is very substantial. Good work!


Pete

#9 ziridava

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 12:33 PM

Schaden
Congratulations!
I split Antares two years ago ,in the summer of 2011,with my 125mm F/7 Dobsonian ,at 216x,using a Solid Ramsden 8mm eyepiece and a 2x Japanese Barlow.
The SR 8mm is a modern variation of Tolles eyepiece.
Apart of good seeing and good telescope,I believe the use of simple eyepieces/minimum air-to-glass surfaces is helpful on such objects.
At Antares I remember to see the same colors of the companion like you and Paul/C_Moon.
Thank you for posting this,this is the time to test my 8 inch Dobsonian on Antares.
Mircea

#10 rookie

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 09:57 PM

Nicely done! Congratulations. :bow:

#11 Perigny270

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 11:14 PM

Well I finally got a clean split. I tried a few times this spring but seeing just wasn't there. I also tried reducing the glare from A by using a green filter (a tip from here last year). The best was an oscillating elongated blob. No satisfaction there.
Then a few nights ago I was looking at planets and the moon and Antares beckoned. So I swung my 8SE around. Couldn't see B at all in the glare from A. The only filter I had in my EP kit was my Baader UHC - what the heck. At 200X there was a red star and a green star overlapping. Resolved, but not split. Happy nonetheless. Going to 400X didn't help at all.
Then the clouds moved in.
A whole new story tonight - this time with my ES102ED. No split at first. Get out the UHC filter and BANG: two separate stars (red and green) with a black space between them. :) My first time for my favourite star. Best at 140X although I did get up to 300X. That was fun! The refractor really does a nice job. on the doubles.
You may want to try the UHC trick. If anyone else has tried it, I'd like to here about it.

#12 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 05:47 AM

Myself and other observers have tried UHC filters and have found out that some of them show a secondary reflection of a bright star which will make you think you split a double. I'd suggest you try the filter on a bright known single star and see what happens. I personally don't trust UHC filters for splitting doubles. Hopefully you've been able to split Antares.

Rich (RLTYS)

#13 Nucleophile

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 06:36 AM

Myself and other observers have tried UHC filters and have found out that some of them show a secondary reflection of a bright star which will make you think you split a double. I'd suggest you try the filter on a bright known single star and see what happens. I personally don't trust UHC filters for splitting doubles. Hopefully you've been able to split Antares.

Rich (RLTYS)


Several years ago, I saw the exact same thing Rich describes with my 8 inch reflector using a Baader UHC filter--I cant remember which star exactly but do remember it was one that had a very bright primary (such as Antares).

This double is tricky for me even with the 15 inch. Early in the night I can easily see the secondary at 200x or so, but then later in the night I cannot (when conditions should be better). Oddly enough, if the seeing is very good, I can see the companion quite clearly at 150x with the 8 inch. It seems sky conditions are the most important factor for Antares. I seem to recall most of my positive sightings happening at the end of twilight versus in the deep dark of late night--maybe that is the trick?

I did make a very preliminary finding recently using an off axis mask with my 15 to afford an unobstructed 6 inch telescope in which the secondary appeared a bit better to see due to overall dimming of the primary.

Try as I may, I have not been able to obtain a good image of the secondary in any scope with any combination of lenses or camera conditions. Antares is ridiculously difficult to photograph.

You should keep trying this one, though, as you will may see the companion when you least suspect it. :grin:

#14 Perigny270

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 09:34 PM

Thanks for the advice and feedback. For now it looks like a false alarm (darn!). :( I will try another bright star to check out the reflection.
I will also keep trying with other filters. Dimming the bright primary is difficult. Antares is always a joy to look at. I'll let you know of any development.

#15 fred1871

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 12:30 AM

You could try observing in twilight to dim the primary star; the companion is bright enough to show when the sky is not fully dark. It can reduce the glare factor.

The biggest problem with Antares is seeing conditions; good air steadiness is essential, and for observers a long way north that's harder to get because Antares stays low in the sky. On the steadiest nights, I've seen the companion (no filter needed) at only 100x, neatly separated from the primary.

#16 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 05:05 AM

Good seeing conditions are extremely important for splitting Antares.

Rich (RLTYS)

#17 Achernar

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 07:02 PM

Interesting, I have noticed Antares B appearing bluish white sometimes too, even though usually it appears greenish. When it does appear that way, it's usually when the seeing is very steady.

Taras

#18 ggalilei

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 10:06 AM

Congratulations Schaden! I only managed a clean split a couple of times and it was exciting. One problem is that Antares tends to stay rather low at Northern latitudes and there is quite a bit of sparkle. The companion rides just in front of Antares as they drift through the field of view: that makes it easy to locate it.

#19 Mark Teran

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 02:13 PM

Hi:

Whaddaya need to split Antares? I have a 100mm ED refractor, but I have feeling that's not big enough. Of course, I could look it up too. Congrats on that nice split.

Mark

#20 Bonco

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 03:21 PM

Mark,
I've obtained several nice splits with a 100mm telescope. Suggest 200-250X.
Bill

#21 Messyone

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 06:57 PM

Congrats Schaden. Gotten into doubles too recently and got my first Antares split last night :jump: As others have said seeing is everything.Using an XW 7mm I watched with my 6" f8 achro for nearly an hour...and got there in the end. Seeing wasn't that good, spotted the b star,which was green to my eyes and oh so close to Antares, in glimpses here and there. Had to keep watching to be sure my mind wasn't playing tricks on me.
I tried using a semi-apo filter with no luck for 20 mins before removing it. Antares was pretty much overhead too.
I'd love to see this in better conditions.
Matt

#22 Svezda

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 08:47 PM

I was so shocked to split Antares so cleanly a few years ago at a very modest power (x80) with my Tak FS-102...I had no real expectation of doing it but tried it anyway. That was a very memorable observation (no filter and I'm a very experienced observer - no doubt about splitting it).

#23 Tyranthrax

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Posted 09 July 2013 - 10:06 PM

Did you get a picture? I looked at Antares but I didn't know it was a double. . .

#24 David Knisely

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Posted 09 July 2013 - 10:11 PM

I had a nice time with Antares at the 2nd annual Nebraska Star Party. It was in twilight and the seeing was excellent, so I put my 10 inch f/5.6 Newtonian on it. Sure enough, the companion was plainly visible at around 220x. Just for fun, I put on my variable aperture stop on the front of the scope and dialed things down to only 97mm (3.8 inches). The companion was still there, although at only a 2.6 arc second separation, it was considerably more difficult to see than it had been with the full 10 inches of aperture. Clear skies to you.

#25 Ralph Steudtner

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 04:03 PM

Last night a friend of mine and I tried to split Antares with a 16 inch Starmaster. Using a 9mm eyepiece Antares was just too bright to detect the secondary. We then used an Astronomik UHC. Antares became bright red and what appeared to be the secondary showed up as a bright blue color at about the 6 or 7 o'clock position. As has been mentioned I don't know if this was a split or reflection but it certainly was impressive. Looking at other single stars with the Astronomik UHC made them look reddish but did not display the bright blue effect. For this reason I am not certain what I was seeing.






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