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M45 & Planetary

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#1 Nebhunter

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 10:21 PM

Last fall I shot a rising M45 with the Tec 140. I did a shorter exposure for f/7 due to a rising sun, but it was enough to capture these two. It was difficult doing a search for these objects and to discover their exact identities, and have since lost the paper. I found these under the loupe on the light table.

I have quite a few Pentax medium format lenses that I'm just not using anymore. If anyone is interested in these please send me a PM.

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#2 Nebhunter

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 10:22 PM

Here is the second discovery - much fainter.

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#3 Michal1

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 04:35 AM

Hi Igor,
have you identified the objects? nova.astrometry.net is good for it. If you know the approximate coordinates and the resolution of the image, Pinpoint in Maxim DL is usefull.
On one of my films blue spots come out. See them here: http://www.astro.cz/...m/dots.jpg.html . Since they appeared only on a single roll of film, they were probably caused by an error at development. In the picture, you can see a group of these spots, but on some frames there was only one. When I found the first, I thought it is a supernova.

#4 Nebhunter

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 05:00 PM

Michal I did some hunting around and found what appeared to be these targets but not sure exactly going by description. The blue planetary is a small O when viewed at high resolution or under the loupe. The faint red blotches are there as well as I found them on the roll shot with the 400 lens as well as the Tec.

That's a pain to have your films ruined that way. I had a lab in my city do that to 3 rolls when the machine ran the film under belts and rollers. That hurts when you count the hours spent gathering the light.

igor

#5 Nightfly

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 07:42 PM

I checked Uranometria 2000.0 but found nothing close to M45. These must be tiny / faint little guys.

#6 Michal1

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 04:45 AM

The blue object on the first frame has coordinates (J2000.0)
R.A. 03:45:48.7
Dec. 22:23:01.7
Here is the solved plate by nova.astrometry. And here is a picture from DSS. It shows the area around the quadrangre of bright stars, which surrounds the object. There seems to be nothing. A supernova?

#7 Jeff Phinney

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 04:29 PM

Nothing shows on the POSS II blue plate of the STScI Digitized Sky Survey:

http://archive.stsci...ue&r=03:45%3...

I going to assume that it's an emulsion flaw, an air bubble trapped on the emulsion during processing, or an inverted pinhole image of dust just before the film plane.

#8 Nebhunter

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Posted 16 June 2013 - 08:31 PM

Well as far as emulsion or dust goes I was shooting the Tec 140 and my 400 lens on the G11 at the same time - side by each. These objects appear on both films - exactly - so it's not an anomaly. Looking over the one scan closely I find a faint blue splotch well above M45 as well. The other objects are clearly visible on the film under the loupe on the light table.

I know the blue planetary exists as I found the description and number (misplaced it) for it. But those red blotches are a mystery. I should have posted the enlarged version to make it easier to see.

igor

#9 TxStars

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Posted 16 June 2013 - 11:06 PM

There are still new and over-looked objects being discovered (Even with film).
http://en.wikipedia....McNeil's_Nebula
Make sure you document time /date/position and re-shoot the same area with a longer focal length and more exposure time to see if more detail shows up.
You may also want to contact your local univertity astronomy department for posible research into the objects.
Your work may even be part of something that gets published.(See fig #4)
http://space.rice.ed...m/sunearth.html

#10 Michal1

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 08:40 AM

How about the lights on a plane or helicopter? Can you see any parallax of the blotches between the frames from Tec and 400? It will be best visible, when the two frames are aligned and stacked by Registar or similar software.






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