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Age of the Moon

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#26 Carl12

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 10:39 AM


I would urge those who are seeking to plug holes in the impact theory to stop running round the epicycles and to consider a smaller, more probable impact, with a smaller Moon already in place.


But this is not your original assertion. You implied earlier that the moon was formed prior and independently of the original circumstellar disk, based on your thinking that because there were a lot of craters on the moon, it must be older than Sol system (an invalid conclusion)
I am totally lost as to where your reasoning is going, because your original premise is morphing from post to post into something else.


I've been quite consistent throughout, that planetary objects must pre-date the Sun by the very nature of the processes by which the Sun came to be.

That said, the state that those planetaries were in at the moment of stellar ignition is unknown to us, further evolution would be more than likely in the no doubt energetic solar nebula. Growth through impacts and resurfacing would be plausible.

I would also add that the age of the Moon's surface is far from proven as we haven't dated the very oldest structures, likely to be found in the ancient highlands on the other side. The margin of 200my difference from Earth, as reported in this thread, doesn't seem so great and could easily be overcome.

In short, I'm being flexible on the detail due to paucity of evidence, but consistent on the main point.

#27 photonovore

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 11:28 PM

There isn't any reason why noritic anorthosites would vary significantly in age between farside/nearside highlands since the oldest of these plutonic rocks from either hemisphere would be reasonably expected to date to the same stage of the Moon's geologic history (crystallization stage of the lunar crust, which current data indicate to have been a global event).






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