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Mallincam Xtreme help!!!

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#1 sealevel

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 12:12 PM

Hi All,
PLEASE HELP! I finally got my Mallincam Xtreme. All I want to do is hook it up to my telescope and see the image on my computer (no HD TV monitor). Can someone please draw a diagram of the wiring set up for me. That Maillincam Video grabber has me stumped with all the wires.

I have: A Mallancam Xtreme w/ all the wiring
I have the Mallincam Xtreme software
I have the Mallincam Xtreme USB HD Grabber & software and drivers.

All I want to do is hook up the camera to the scope and see the image on my laptop. I would really appreciate a schematic. Thanks in advance...

NOTE: I have been playing around with the camera at my kitchen table to see if I can get it to work with a monitor. I can't get it to work. Do I need to be connected to the telescope to work with the Mallincam?

Davio R.

#2 Dwight J

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 12:44 PM

No diagram but simple to get image onto a screen. You don't need a HDTV, any TV will do. The cable that has the power cable also is a video out cable with DIN connectors. You will need a DIN to RCA adapter on the end you wish to connect to the TV RCA video in jack. Alternately, buy a SVHS cable and connect it to the SVHS out jack on the back of the camera and the other end into your TV SVHS in jack. The same cable (SVHS) is used with the Mallincam MCV-1 to get the image onto your computer. You will need to load the drivers from the disk supplied with the MCV-1. Use either the program loaded from the disk or AmCap to view and adjust the image. As this is an Extreme you will need to plug in the computer control cable or use the wireless exposure control to obtain longer exposures. Join the Yahoo Mallincam group and view the files section for more detail and info.

#3 Lorence

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 01:46 PM

Can someone please draw a diagram of the wiring set up for me. That Maillincam Video grabber has me stumped with all the wires.


Can you look at the Mallincam Yahoo site?

http://tech.groups.y...roup/mallincam/

There's more information over there that most will ever need. I could have found the info you want over there in less time that it took me to respond to your message here.

#4 mclewis1

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 06:08 PM

Davio,

Let me give you an overview of what you need to do. First the picture ...

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#5 mclewis1

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 06:33 PM

You can start with just the video/power cable. You don't have to use the power side of the cable, you can simply plug the 12v AC adapter directly into the camera.

The BNC to RCA connector should be in your package with the Mallincam.
The MCV-1 plugs directly into a USB port on your laptop.
Have you downloaded the latest MCV-1 device driver?
http://mallincam.tri...files/setup.exe
Does the MCV-1 show up in your device table as an available device? (no yellow warning beside it)
You don't actually have to use the Mallincam control software at this point, but you might as well load it up and use it to display the video stream from the MCV-1. Right now you can ignore any com port error messages that might come up.

Assuming the MCV-1 is operating correctly (device driver loaded and functional) and the cable is plugged in you can now display video from the camera. On the back of the camera are the OSD (on screen display) buttons. Push the upper and lower buttons together, hold them down together for a couple of seconds. This will bring up a color bar test screen.

Go to the Video tab in the software, press Device and select the MCV-1 (I believe it identifies itself as something like 2885), then press preview. You should now have a new window with the color bars in it. If you do then the video side of the camera and connectivity right back to your laptop is working. To get rid of the color bars simultaneously press the upper and lower OSD buttons again.

If you can't get the color bars up then it's likely the MCV-1 device driver isn't working. If that's the case then you'll need the help of the folks on the Yahoo Mallincam group.

If you want a tutorial on using the camera from the OSD buttons (useful to just check some things out and test the camera during daylight hours) use the MCHP documentation in the files section of the Yahoo Mallincam group. To try the camera in daylight start with the suggested settings for lunar viewing, this will get you in the ball park exposure wise.

#6 Jack Huerkamp

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 10:18 PM

Check out the first link on my Download page:

http://www.mallincam...dable Files.htm

Jack Huerkamp

#7 rmollise

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 07:21 AM

Hi All,
PLEASE HELP! I finally got my Mallincam Xtreme. All I want to do is hook it up to my telescope and see the image on my computer (no HD TV monitor). Can someone please draw a diagram of the wiring set up for me. That Maillincam Video grabber has me stumped with all the wires.

I have: A Mallancam Xtreme w/ all the wiring
I have the Mallincam Xtreme software
I have the Mallincam Xtreme USB HD Grabber & software and drivers.

All I want to do is hook up the camera to the scope and see the image on my laptop. I would really appreciate a schematic. Thanks in advance...

NOTE: I have been playing around with the camera at my kitchen table to see if I can get it to work with a monitor. I can't get it to work. Do I need to be connected to the telescope to work with the Mallincam?

Davio R.


What are you using for a display? As you may have discovered by now, the Mallincam outputs composite video, and there is no composite video input on a computer. You have two choices. You can connect the Mallincam to a TV or monitor that has composite video inputs, or you can buy a frame-grabber which will allow you to connect the camera to your computer. ;)

#8 mclewis1

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 08:49 AM

Davio has no need to buy another frame grabber ... he already has the Mallincam MCV-1.

#9 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 09:29 AM

These cameras from Rock really should come with more thorough documentation and instructions than they do. The Universe seems to be the only camera so far to now be shipping with a true and proper manual. It's not valid to assume the customer will possess the requisite knowledge, or to force him to have to cast about with plaintive pleas for assistance just to get *started*.

#10 rmollise

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 12:40 PM

There's actually a decent manual available for the Xtreme. Not perfect, no, and spread across several files, but enough to get you going.

#11 sealevel

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 08:12 AM

Hi Mark, Glen, Jack, Rod, Lorence and Dwight,
Thanks for all your input. I got the Mallincam to work at my kitchen table. Obviously no image, just a dark and white software preview screen as I passed my hand back and forth over the ccd chip. I bought the Milo Slick Scientific software package for my Mallincam Xtreme. It seems to be ten times easier to operate than the stock software from Mallincam. I live in Florida and our prime observing conditions start in late fall through early spring. I will start my camera observing then, now that I know how the camera, wiring and software operate together.

Mark - Thanks for that simple yet precise diagram. I opted to use the s-Video cable instead of the composite cable. I tried both and they both work. Maybe the s-Video cable will give me a little better video quality.

Once again, thank you one and all. When I finally make it to the scope, I'll know where to come for expert help. You guys are the BEST!

Davio R.

#12 dragonslayer1

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 10:12 AM

Don't wait for prime time, the great thing about these cameras is they pull stuff out in bad viewing conditions. You will never know how good they are till you try them out,, just my opinion.
Kasey

#13 Dragon Man

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 11:23 AM

Don't wait for prime time, the great thing about these cameras is they pull stuff out in bad viewing conditions. You will never know how good they are till you try them out,, just my opinion.
Kasey


Yep, they see quite well in bad light pollution and even thin cloud.

One night while Broadcasting on NSN I seemed to be losing focus a little bit. My electric focuser was working fine so I went outside to see if something had gone wrong. I walked outside, looked up and it was total cloud cover, yet Galaxy NGC4945 was still showing nicely (but with a slightly out of focus appearance) on the screen.
Since then, I have broadcast on all sorts of cloudy nights :lol:
Unfortunately no-one has invented a filter to see through thick cloud yet :p

#14 sealevel

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 11:32 AM


Wow! That's all I need to hear. That is hard to believe. Now I'm going to have to get out there A.S.A.P. Summer observing, in Florida, is back on the menu again, I guess.

Davio R.

#15 jimb1001

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 01:33 PM

Wow! That's all I need to hear. That is hard to believe. Now I'm going to have to get out there A.S.A.P. Summer observing, in Florida, is back on the menu again, I guess.

Davio R.


After 10 years of trying to observe in Florida summers it now needs to be a special night for me to set up.

The humidity increases the sky glow, the dew shields take care of the corrector but monitors and computer get soaked really fast and you need to set up your Therma Cell insect repellent 10 minutes before you go out. Of course the threat of sudden rain is always there, day or night, in Florida in the summer.

I still set up in summer but it really needs to be a special night. People in other parts of the country sometimes don't appreciate the challenges of observing in Florida in the summer. For most people in other areas, summer is a great break from observing in the cold, but having observed in upstate New York in winter and Florida in summer, I think I'd take the cold over the humidity.

#16 mclewis1

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 01:38 PM

Davio,

You will indeed be surprised by the capabilities of sensitive cameras like the Mallincams under less than perfect conditions. At dark sites you can really have quite a bit of cloud cover before an object actually disappears. Under more light polluted skies it's not quite the same thing. The light bounces off of any cloud layer or even excessive moisture and smog (which is one reason why the skies look brighter in the summer). So you'll find that with bad light pollution even just a little cloud layer will often obliterate an object.

When observing in real time the bottom line though is to ignore much of the old world observing guidelines (such as the use of narrow band filters) about what can't be seen or done and just try things ... you'll often be pleasantly surprised.

#17 mpgxsvcd

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Posted 09 July 2013 - 12:36 PM


Wow! That's all I need to hear. That is hard to believe. Now I'm going to have to get out there A.S.A.P. Summer observing, in Florida, is back on the menu again, I guess.

Davio R.


After 10 years of trying to observe in Florida summers it now needs to be a special night for me to set up.

The humidity increases the sky glow, the dew shields take care of the corrector but monitors and computer get soaked really fast and you need to set up your Therma Cell insect repellent 10 minutes before you go out. Of course the threat of sudden rain is always there, day or night, in Florida in the summer.

I still set up in summer but it really needs to be a special night. People in other parts of the country sometimes don't appreciate the challenges of observing in Florida in the summer. For most people in other areas, summer is a great break from observing in the cold, but having observed in upstate New York in winter and Florida in summer, I think I'd take the cold over the humidity.


Eastern North Carolina isn't much better. Is has been raining for several weeks now. When we say it is clear out we really mean that the clouds are "clearly" visible.

#18 Spacetravelerx

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Posted 09 July 2013 - 02:25 PM


Wow! That's all I need to hear. That is hard to believe. Now I'm going to have to get out there A.S.A.P. Summer observing, in Florida, is back on the menu again, I guess.

Davio R.


After 10 years of trying to observe in Florida summers it now needs to be a special night for me to set up.

The humidity increases the sky glow, the dew shields take care of the corrector but monitors and computer get soaked really fast and you need to set up your Therma Cell insect repellent 10 minutes before you go out. Of course the threat of sudden rain is always there, day or night, in Florida in the summer.

I still set up in summer but it really needs to be a special night. People in other parts of the country sometimes don't appreciate the challenges of observing in Florida in the summer. For most people in other areas, summer is a great break from observing in the cold, but having observed in upstate New York in winter and Florida in summer, I think I'd take the cold over the humidity.


Eastern North Carolina isn't much better. Is has been raining for several weeks now. When we say it is clear out we really mean that the clouds are "clearly" visible.


Everyone east of the Mississippi, and especially the SE - I feel your pain.

Trust me, living in West Michigan observing was highly challenging. I can only imagine how bad it is in the SE. Whenever I visit I wonder how you folks do it.

Like I said before, once I moved to New Mexico it was like I purchased a brand new telescope. AND massively more days to conduct observing sessions (though right now I am in the heart of the Monsoon Season :cloudy: ).
-- 300+ Clear nights
-- High altitude (5500' approximately)
-- No bugs
-- Fewer painfully cold nights

And observing in the remote high desert is wonderful.

I can imagine with the population growth in the SE, light pollution is ever more magnified over there. I bring one of my telescopes back to Michigan sometimes when I travel. Over the last 2 years I had one barely successful observing session - the Transit of Venus. Otherwise when in town with the telescope never a good day. Grrrrrrr....


P.S. - The MallinCam Extreme is a wonderful kit!

#19 sealevel

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 01:12 PM


Wow! That's all I need to hear. That is hard to believe. Now I'm going to have to get out there A.S.A.P. Summer observing, in Florida, is back on the menu again, I guess.

Davio R.


After 10 years of trying to observe in Florida summers it now needs to be a special night for me to set up.

The humidity increases the sky glow, the dew shields take care of the corrector but monitors and computer get soaked really fast and you need to set up your Therma Cell insect repellent 10 minutes before you go out. Of course the threat of sudden rain is always there, day or night, in Florida in the summer.

I still set up in summer but it really needs to be a special night. People in other parts of the country sometimes don't appreciate the challenges of observing in Florida in the summer. For most people in other areas, summer is a great break from observing in the cold, but having observed in upstate New York in winter and Florida in summer, I think I'd take the cold over the humidity.


Eastern North Carolina isn't much better. Is has been raining for several weeks now. When we say it is clear out we really mean that the clouds are "clearly" visible.


Everyone east of the Mississippi, and especially the SE - I feel your pain.

Trust me, living in West Michigan observing was highly challenging. I can only imagine how bad it is in the SE. Whenever I visit I wonder how you folks do it.

Like I said before, once I moved to New Mexico it was like I purchased a brand new telescope. AND massively more days to conduct observing sessions (though right now I am in the heart of the Monsoon Season :cloudy: ).
-- 300+ Clear nights
-- High altitude (5500' approximately)
-- No bugs
-- Fewer painfully cold nights

And observing in the remote high desert is wonderful.

I can imagine with the population growth in the SE, light pollution is ever more magnified over there. I bring one of my telescopes back to Michigan sometimes when I travel. Over the last 2 years I had one barely successful observing session - the Transit of Venus. Otherwise when in town with the telescope never a good day. Grrrrrrr....


P.S. - The MallinCam Extreme is a wonderful kit!


Hi Andrew and All,
Actually I live in SW Florida, very near the gulf coast, and there are tons of nice observing nights during the summer months. We're known as the sunshine state. Sometimes I do wonder why I'm not observing more during the summer. SW Florida's average summer night temps are ~72-74 degs. with a relative humidity of ~70-80%. Maybe it's because our autumn, winter, and spring are just sooooo perfect for observing. Then again it maybe just laziness. :-)

Davio R.

#20 rmollise

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 02:40 PM


After 10 years of trying to observe in Florida summers it now needs to be a special night for me to set up.


There's no doubt Florida can be humid and buggy, but I observe regularly from Florida, and have had quite a few mind blowing nights over the last five years. One in which the False Comet down in Sagittarius looked as good as I've seen it from Prude Ranch. The thing is, in Florida, it's often not obvious a night is going to be special...the special usually comes after midnight this time of year. So...get out there on any clear night and hit it HARD. :lol:

#21 Spacetravelerx

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 03:12 PM



After 10 years of trying to observe in Florida summers it now needs to be a special night for me to set up.


There's no doubt Florida can be humid and buggy, but I observe regularly from Florida, and have had quite a few mind blowing nights over the last five years. One in which the False Comet down in Sagittarius looked as good as I've seen it from Prude Ranch. The thing is, in Florida, it's often not obvious a night is going to be special...the special usually comes after midnight this time of year. So...get out there on any clear night and hit it HARD. :lol:



Uncle Rod and Davio,

I stand corrected on florida and its clear nights.

Still, the two things I do not miss are the bugs and DEW. Yes, I got used to it when living in Michigan, but now that I am in New Mexico I am glad I am far away from it. Though I guess a scorpion could bite me! ;)

FYI - in the midwest I would have up to 60 days straight of cloud covered skies. Yikes!

BTW I have been looking into the various observing events in Florida. Great stories Uncle Rod.

But that humidity. Very good article Uncle Rod on "Dew Busting", my question is do you put the Kendrick or DewBuster on the MallinCAM? Then again, isn't cooling the camera the name of the game? Any moisture leak in the camera? Or does one not bother with dew on a MallinCAM (I am imagining things soaking wet!).

Do I need 90% DEET to handle the bugs in Florida?

#22 rmollise

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 04:21 PM

[
Still, the two things I do not miss are the bugs and DEW. Yes, I got used to it when living in Michigan, but now that I am in New Mexico I am glad I am far away from it. Though I guess a scorpion could bite me! ;)



FYI - in the midwest I would have up to 60 days straight of cloud covered skies. Yikes!


Bugs? You will get used to 'em. A few observing seasons and they will seem as natural to you as ticks on an old hound dog. :lol:

If you just insist on running them off, a Thermacell, yes, works wonders. And if you're going to use a repellent, it has to have DEET whether you are in Maine or Florida--nothing else works.

As for FL and bugs? My observing site is near the Suwannee River, and only 20 miles from the coast, but really is not bad skeeter-wise.

As for the Mallincam? I have never experienced dewing/frosting under the worst conditions. HOWEVER...it is semi "sealed". I use it with focal reducers whether on a C8 or C11, so it doesn't get much in the way of airflow like it might on a short focal length Newtonian. My scope tube can be raining, but the Mallincam just keeps on keeping on.

You WILL need a dew heater for your scope objective/corrector, though. I recommend the DewBuster.

#23 Spacetravelerx

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 07:43 PM

[
Still, the two things I do not miss are the bugs and DEW. Yes, I got used to it when living in Michigan, but now that I am in New Mexico I am glad I am far away from it. Though I guess a scorpion could bite me! ;)



FYI - in the midwest I would have up to 60 days straight of cloud covered skies. Yikes!


Bugs? You will get used to 'em. A few observing seasons and they will seem as natural to you as ticks on an old hound dog. :lol:

If you just insist on running them off, a Thermacell, yes, works wonders. And if you're going to use a repellent, it has to have DEET whether you are in Maine or Florida--nothing else works.

As for FL and bugs? My observing site is near the Suwannee River, and only 20 miles from the coast, but really is not bad skeeter-wise.

As for the Mallincam? I have never experienced dewing/frosting under the worst conditions. HOWEVER...it is semi "sealed". I use it with focal reducers whether on a C8 or C11, so it doesn't get much in the way of airflow like it might on a short focal length Newtonian. My scope tube can be raining, but the Mallincam just keeps on keeping on.

You WILL need a dew heater for your scope objective/corrector, though. I recommend the DewBuster.



Whew on the MallinCam. I just would hate to see that get wet.


Question - do they allow Yankees in that part of Florida? I have visited Mississippi a bit. Friendly folks and they felt I was good, for a Yankee.

#24 jimb1001

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 01:12 AM


Wow! That's all I need to hear. That is hard to believe. Now I'm going to have to get out there A.S.A.P. Summer observing, in Florida, is back on the menu again, I guess.

Davio R.


After 10 years of trying to observe in Florida summers it now needs to be a special night for me to set up.

The humidity increases the sky glow, the dew shields take care of the corrector but monitors and computer get soaked really fast and you need to set up your Therma Cell insect repellent 10 minutes before you go out. Of course the threat of sudden rain is always there, day or night, in Florida in the summer.

I still set up in summer but it really needs to be a special night. People in other parts of the country sometimes don't appreciate the challenges of observing in Florida in the summer. For most people in other areas, summer is a great break from observing in the cold, but having observed in upstate New York in winter and Florida in summer, I think I'd take the cold over the humidity.


Eastern North Carolina isn't much better. Is has been raining for several weeks now. When we say it is clear out we really mean that the clouds are "clearly" visible.


Everyone east of the Mississippi, and especially the SE - I feel your pain.

Trust me, living in West Michigan observing was highly challenging. I can only imagine how bad it is in the SE. Whenever I visit I wonder how you folks do it.

Like I said before, once I moved to New Mexico it was like I purchased a brand new telescope. AND massively more days to conduct observing sessions (though right now I am in the heart of the Monsoon Season :cloudy: ).
-- 300+ Clear nights
-- High altitude (5500' approximately)
-- No bugs
-- Fewer painfully cold nights

And observing in the remote high desert is wonderful.

I can imagine with the population growth in the SE, light pollution is ever more magnified over there. I bring one of my telescopes back to Michigan sometimes when I travel. Over the last 2 years I had one barely successful observing session - the Transit of Venus. Otherwise when in town with the telescope never a good day. Grrrrrrr....


P.S. - The MallinCam Extreme is a wonderful kit!


Hi Andrew and All,
Actually I live in SW Florida, very near the gulf coast, and there are tons of nice observing nights during the summer months. We're known as the sunshine state. Sometimes I do wonder why I'm not observing more during the summer. SW Florida's average summer night temps are ~72-74 degs. with a relative humidity of ~70-80%. Maybe it's because our autumn, winter, and spring are just sooooo perfect for observing. Then again it maybe just laziness. :-)

Davio R.


Its 2AM and my little weather station says that here in the Tampa Bay area its 82 degrees with 83 percent humidity.

To me, its not fun trying to keep the laptop, monitor and all else dry in this weather.

#25 sealevel

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 02:45 AM

Yep, it was unusually warm and humid tonight. I observe from a SkyShed Pod with the slit opening attachment (Pod Visor). That gives good protection from both wind and dew. None-the-less, it was very warm and humid tonight.

http://www.skyshedpod.com/

Davio R.

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