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Meade Options; S&T Article and Outreach and Other

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#51 orion61

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 05:13 AM

I still have a relic NOS Pace mobile from 1961 that is still new in the box never installed.
It was in the stock of an old shop. It didnt sell but became a mascot for display..
but back to the post.
I know that telescope mfgrs have changed for customer desire for cheaper.. They have turned into unusable and unreliable junk on the low side and product rushed into sales WO spending the time and money to fully Beta test,
so the darn things work on the high end.
I hope Russ and the Folks from E.S. win the day..

#52 iverp

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 12:36 PM

What about the hundreds they spent on the phone? These things ain't cheap. You could buy a decent Intelliscope for what a smartphone costs.


Actually, my smart phone was a "free" upgrade on Black Friday. But I do pay $20/mo for data.

#53 Bernie Poskus

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 04:47 PM


Heck they even want to shut down the CB radio band to make more room for Smart Phone Apps.. "Breaker,Breaker, Bandit ya got your ears on"?
I'm 10-7 on the side from my 10-20 in NW Iowa....


Speaking as a Ham who thinks that "appropriating" the (old) 11 meter Ham band for the "Citizen's Radio Service" was one of the greatest mistakes (among many mistakes)that the FCC has made, I'd say "Go for it". CB radio was never worth a darn but today it's degenerated into utter uselessness.


I haven't listened to CB radio since I was 15 and got my first ham license. I have been licensed ever since.

Like astronomy, Ham Radio is suffering because people think the Internet is everything. However, like the experience of locating and observing a galaxy 60 million light years away, the experience of speaking with someone thousands of miles away, without the benefit of wires connecting you (or perhaps fiber optic cable) is something different from merely sending an email, or looking at a digital picture on the Internet.

Hopefully, there will always be people who don't want some synthetic version of an experience, and want to do the extra work to experience the real thing. There is a romance and joy to seeing (or hearing) it for real. I hope we never stop doing what we are doing.

#54 amicus sidera

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 06:46 PM

I never understand the NEED to bring others into my hobbies. It's just something I like and if I was the only one on the planet then that's ok. If others enjoy it then that's ok too. I just don't get trying to bring others into the fold. I didn't need to be brought in I found my own way in.


Very well-stated! I agree completely.

I can understand the need to keep the ranks well-filled as regards a pursuit like ham radio; the pastime is pursued at the whim of the legislature, and the field of exertion is public airwaves, the lack of access to which would end the hobby; numbers are required to hold on to the frequency allocations.

Astronomy is, thankfully, a different pickle altogether :grin: There is night sky above everyone's head; it may not be pristinely dark, and in fact may be quite light-polluted; however, it is there, in greater or lesser glory, for all to see - no license required. Political clout isn't needed to maintain the hobby. As for strength in numbers to effect legislation that would reduce light pollution, it has proven to be a non-starter, the IDA notwithstanding... that train left the station long ago. In the developed world, any substantial reduction in sky brightness over populated areas will almost certainly remain a lost cause until the rising cost of energy makes excessive lighting economically unviable (which might occur much sooner than most might think). Light pollution has actually led to a renaissance in digital astrophotography, as objects unable to be seen visually from a city may still be captured via CCD.

That said, sufficient numbers of amateurs are needed to make the mass production of telescopes and accessories profitable... happily, those numbers certainly exist today, and undoubtedly will well into the future.

It appears to me that it wasn't an overall lack of interest in astronomy, but poor business decisions, that led to Meade's current situation.

Fred

#55 Whichwayisnorth

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 03:57 PM

Related to this topic I have asked the question: Could we, the CN community, come up with marketing towards those who haven't considered Astronomy or having a Telescope, and crowd fund it.
I just posted in the Stellar Media thread on this subject. Check it out and contribute to the discussion if you are so inclined.

#56 rdandrea

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 04:04 PM

I can understand the need to keep the ranks well-filled as regards a pursuit like ham radio; the pastime is pursued at the whim of the legislature, and the field of exertion is public airwaves, the lack of access to which would end the hobby; numbers are required to hold on to the frequency allocations.



There's another very important reason why numbers are important in ham radio. It's all about talking to people, whether by CW, digital, or phone. If the ranks dwindle too far, there's not too many people left to talk to.

I agree with your main point, though. Astronomy, in contrast to ham radio, doesn't require having a person on the other end. You can be the last amateur astronomer in the world and you'll still be able to look at the stars.






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