Jump to content


Photo

Awesome fireball

  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#1 johnsshipp

johnsshipp

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 70
  • Joined: 29 Oct 2012
  • Loc: Baton Rouge, LA, USA

Posted 19 July 2013 - 05:38 AM

Did anyone else see an awesome fireball zip through Perseus around 4:30CST? It was the best I've ever seen. Left a glowing trail and everything. It's amazing how you can spend hours tracking down faint fuzzies and double stars but the best observation of the night happens when you aren't even using your scope. Gotta love this hobby

-John

#2 AstroTatDad

AstroTatDad

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1034
  • Joined: 22 Apr 2013
  • Loc: Los Angeles - San Diego

Posted 19 July 2013 - 04:33 PM

Did anyone else see an awesome fireball zip through Perseus around 4:30CST? It was the best I've ever seen. Left a glowing trail and everything. It's amazing how you can spend hours tracking down faint fuzzies and double stars but the best observation of the night happens when you aren't even using your scope. Gotta love this hobby

-John


That's awesome John,

You know, I was thinking to myself last night when I was out looking up, in the past 3 to 4 months I have observed a lot of good "fire balls" more bolide's then I have seen in the past 20 year's. I also live is a red zone and seeing these, there has been a lot of action going on this year, more then I have seen.

About 3 weeks ago we were out observing and we seen a bright green one, that one was just sparking away :) We seen some blue in it too, which I have never seen reminded me of a welder. I have seen all types, but not Green and Blue sparking away like this one.

#3 johnsshipp

johnsshipp

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 70
  • Joined: 29 Oct 2012
  • Loc: Baton Rouge, LA, USA

Posted 19 July 2013 - 06:12 PM

That is seriously cool. I've never seen one other just white but the one I just saw seemed to have a greenish tint in the dust trail. It really makes you wonder how many you miss when you're looking in the eyepiece

#4 lamplight

lamplight

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2528
  • Joined: 18 Sep 2012
  • Loc: western MA, U.S.

Posted 19 July 2013 - 07:19 PM

John
its awesome.. last winter during one of the meteor showers I saw a fireball fly the co lete distance of my sky east to west.. smoke trail the whole way, then the trail vapirized in seconds. I thought I was going to hear an explosion when it hit, it was that big. Pretty cool to see something like that. Saw another, similar a couple months later.

Now that I think of it havent seen too many meteor flashes lately, but then there hasnt been a ton of observing opportunities lately..

#5 Geo31

Geo31

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2182
  • Joined: 28 Jan 2013
  • Loc: Kingwood, TX

Posted 19 July 2013 - 08:50 PM

That is once of the coolest sights in astronomy.

Back when I was in HS I went outside in December going someplace I cannot remember, but looked up at the full moon just in time to see the most amazing bolide! It had to be brighter than mag -8. I mean it was so bright the full moon didn't detract from it. Left a trail that lasted 10-20 minutes about 1/4 deg wide. I went in side and phoned an astronomy friend and told him about it and to go outside and look at the moon. From some distance from the phone I could hear him yell WOW! The trail lasted a good while after I went back outside.

#6 AstroTatDad

AstroTatDad

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1034
  • Joined: 22 Apr 2013
  • Loc: Los Angeles - San Diego

Posted 19 July 2013 - 10:20 PM

They are truly amazing too see.

I have always wanted to go out to the high desert here in California looking for them on the ground with a detector or something. Think that would be neat if I found one. :) Maybe some day I will do so.

Another cool thing to do, I haven't tried it yet. But if you put out like a cup, bucket something to catch the rain. Then strain the water through a thin strainer, then take a magnet to collect the meteor practicals/dust. Sometimes you might get lucky, but it will be very very small amounts. My ex father inlaw passed this down to me, he had a nice collection of meteors he found out in the desert. He also showed me the stuff he caught in the cups, I thought he was joking when he told me. Good man, he worked for NASA for 30 years and was apart of many Apollo missions. Rest his soul, I miss him.. learned so much from him.

#7 krp

krp

    Vendor. DarkSiteFinder.com

  • -----
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 352
  • Joined: 10 Nov 2010
  • Loc: Central Illinois

Posted 20 July 2013 - 12:26 AM

For the next month, expect to see more fireballs as the Delta Aquarids and Perseid meteor showers approach.
I saw an awesome greenish fireball on the morning of July 4th. It was very bright and left a visible train for about 30 seconds. It still showed up in pictures 5 minutes later. Even though I had my camera pointed at the milky way directly where the meteor was, I missed capturing it by 3 seconds :mad:.

#8 brianb11213

brianb11213

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 9047
  • Joined: 25 Feb 2009
  • Loc: 55.215N 6.554W

Posted 20 July 2013 - 02:52 AM

if you put out like a cup, bucket something to catch the rain. Then strain the water through a thin strainer, then take a magnet to collect the meteor practicals/dust. Sometimes you might get lucky, but it will be very very small amounts. My ex father inlaw passed this down to me

OK, you might get meteroic dust these days, but I don't know how you'd distinguish it from iron dust generated by vehicle brakes ... anyone who has an automobile will know that the discs and pads (made of mostly iron) need to be replaced every couple of years or so & the worn off material has to go somewhere.

#9 orion61

orion61

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4576
  • Joined: 20 Oct 2007
  • Loc: Birthplace James T Kirk

Posted 20 July 2013 - 07:59 AM

I have seen many good ones but only one Spectacular one,
It was so bright that like yours There was a Glowing greenish tail that lasted a good 5 minutes! It was close enough My Observing buddy and I could actually HEAR it sizzle and crackle, as it burned up. It covered about 1/5th of the sky!
I must admit as it got closer and brighter, I wondered if we were gonners!
When I got home the next day, My Wife met me at the door all excited, asking if I saw it? It made the local News the next morning!
But it was soooo cool not only seeing, but hearing it!
I dont want to be that scared again for awhile.

#10 BrooksObs

BrooksObs

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 842
  • Joined: 08 Dec 2012

Posted 20 July 2013 - 08:55 AM

It was so bright that like yours There was a Glowing greenish tail that lasted a good 5 minutes! It was close enough My Observing buddy and I could actually HEAR it sizzle and crackle, as it burned up. It covered about 1/5th of the sky!


In fact, that sound you "heard" didn't come directly from the meteor itself (which would have been AT LEAST 30-50 miles above you and any true sound needing many minutes to arrive).

The "sound" you indicate hearing appears to be an electro-magnetic phenomenon very rarely created by the passage of a meteor through the atmosphere. I think the term I've heard it referred to is Brontophonic sound. The idea among those trying to explain it is that the sound is perhaps created by objects in the immediate vicinity of the observer reacting to these arriving electro-magnetic waves. Admittedly, not all scientists believe the phenomenon is real, considering it possibly psychological, even though cases are well documented in the literature.

BrooksObs

#11 brianb11213

brianb11213

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 9047
  • Joined: 25 Feb 2009
  • Loc: 55.215N 6.554W

Posted 20 July 2013 - 09:21 AM

The "sound" you indicate hearing appears to be an electro-magnetic phenomenon very rarely created by the passage of a meteor through the atmosphere. I think the term I've heard it referred to is Brontophonic sound. The idea among those trying to explain it is that the sound is perhaps created by objects in the immediate vicinity of the observer reacting to these arriving electro-magnetic waves. Admittedly, not all scientists believe the phenomenon is real, considering it possibly psychological, even though cases are well documented in the literature.

Alternatively there is a well known psycho/physiological phenomenon, synesthesia, where stimuli to one sense triggers reactions in another which are perceived as real but aren't.

#12 Steve OK

Steve OK

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 845
  • Joined: 22 Sep 2007
  • Loc: OKC, OK

Posted 20 July 2013 - 01:03 PM

I had this same discussion with my neighbor, after he claimed to have heard a "zipping" sound when viewing the Perseids a couple of years ago. I tried to convince him that even if the sound was audible, it would not be simultaneous with the apearance of the meteor. Like lightning and thunder, but with a much longer delay.
Several years ago, I witnessed a great bolide that crossed nearly the entire sky right through the zenith. It lit up the surroundings with its bright blue-green light. Several minutes later, there was a loud boom from over head! A very exciting sight and sound!

Steve

#13 orion61

orion61

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4576
  • Joined: 20 Oct 2007
  • Loc: Birthplace James T Kirk

Posted 20 July 2013 - 02:13 PM

I wasn't the only one that heard the sound, It wasn't in my mind.
You werent there so your opinion means nothing to me.
It was a long lived event and 50 miles?? Who knows, also who knows when the noise came from.. I also never said the sound happened the instant fireball, happened.
Put that in your PHD and smoke it.

#14 AstroTatDad

AstroTatDad

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1034
  • Joined: 22 Apr 2013
  • Loc: Los Angeles - San Diego

Posted 20 July 2013 - 03:50 PM

I have experienced this sound/vibration a few times!!!! And I'm sorry, it does have a "sizzling" sound to it. But we are not hearing the meteor actually burning up.

Meteors that seem to make a sound at the same time you are seeing them. These meteors would be seen and heard simultaneously. Is this possible? Astronomers now say it is possible. They speak of “electrophonic meteors.” The explanation is that meteors give off very low frequency radio waves, which travel at the speed of light. Even though you can’t directly hear radio waves, these waves can cause physical objects on the Earth’s surface to vibrate. The radio waves cause a sound – which our ears might interpret as the sizzle of a meteor shooting by.

#15 krp

krp

    Vendor. DarkSiteFinder.com

  • -----
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 352
  • Joined: 10 Nov 2010
  • Loc: Central Illinois

Posted 20 July 2013 - 04:08 PM

I once watched a good lightning storm from my car, near some power lines. Whenever there was cloud to cloud lightning overhead, the power lines would buzz at the same time. The buzzing sound was instant, but the thunder came a couple seconds later. I wonder if this is the same effect as a meteor's sizzling sound? I can't say I've ever "heard" a meteor before, maybe I will next month.

#16 Steve OK

Steve OK

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 845
  • Joined: 22 Sep 2007
  • Loc: OKC, OK

Posted 20 July 2013 - 05:06 PM

Fascinating...

#17 BrooksObs

BrooksObs

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 842
  • Joined: 08 Dec 2012

Posted 20 July 2013 - 08:38 PM

I once watched a good lightning storm from my car, near some power lines. Whenever there was cloud to cloud lightning overhead, the power lines would buzz at the same time. The buzzing sound was instant, but the thunder came a couple seconds later. I wonder if this is the same effect as a meteor's sizzling sound? I can't say I've ever "heard" a meteor before, maybe I will next month.


No, these would be rather different sorts of phenomena.

The lightening is relatively nearby and is directly enhancing the energy level of the immediately surrounding atmosphere and the power lines near the discharge.

In the instance of "sound generating" meteors, they are at a huge distance from the observer (say 50-100 miles) and the electro-magnetic energy they generate passing through the upper atmosphere is crossing that huge gulf almost instantaneously to stimulate the resonance of nearby objects.

BrooksObs

#18 AstroTatDad

AstroTatDad

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1034
  • Joined: 22 Apr 2013
  • Loc: Los Angeles - San Diego

Posted 20 July 2013 - 09:32 PM

radio waves are pretty amazing, I use to follow a guy on YouTube years ago that was heavy in to HAM radios and such. It was pretty cool, he would record the waves of meteors enter the atmosphere. I tried to find it for you guys but he seems to not have his channel anymore.

I do have this that I saved and thought was pretty cool to share with you guys.
Listening to Northern Lights
https://www.youtube....be_gdata_player

#19 Billytk

Billytk

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1335
  • Joined: 22 Apr 2012
  • Loc: Geneva, Fl.

Posted 21 July 2013 - 07:52 AM

This is an interesting website:

http://www.meteorobs...all/audible.htm

#20 lamplight

lamplight

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2528
  • Joined: 18 Sep 2012
  • Loc: western MA, U.S.

Posted 21 July 2013 - 10:22 PM

I have seen many good ones but only one Spectacular one,
It was so bright that like yours There was a Glowing greenish tail that lasted a good 5 minutes! It was close enough My Observing buddy and I could actually HEAR it sizzle and crackle, as it burned up. It covered about 1/5th of the sky!
I must admit as it got closer and brighter, I wondered if we were gonners!
When I got home the next day, My Wife met me at the door all excited, asking if I saw it? It made the local News the next morning!
But it was soooo cool not only seeing, but hearing it!
I dont want to be that scared again for awhile.

awesome. Sounds better than mine actually! No sound but it was horizon to horizon (albeit much blocked, local trees)






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics