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Volcano on the Moon?

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#1 smitty0

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Posted 19 July 2013 - 04:52 PM

It could be a active volcano on the Moon? I think is dome 'Herodotus 1'
Longitude: 50 ° 56 ' West
Latitude: 25 ° 28 ' North
Quadrant: North - West
Area: Aristarchus crater region

Video:
http://www.youtube.c...eature=youtu.be
2013-07-20 00:04
Celestron C9.25 [235/f25], camera QHY5L-IIm, IRpass filter 720nm.

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#2 desertstars

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Posted 19 July 2013 - 05:25 PM

I believe that's the tip of Mons Herodotus catching the first rays of the morning sun.

#3 rmollise

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Posted 19 July 2013 - 05:37 PM

I believe that's the tip of Mons Herodotus catching the first rays of the morning sun.


Yep.

#4 smitty0

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Posted 19 July 2013 - 05:45 PM

I believe that's the tip of Mons Herodotus catching the first rays of the morning sun.

But it so bright... Ok, tomorrow will try to make more pictures of this location.

#5 azure1961p

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 02:47 AM

I'd be highly inclined to believe its not an active volcano.

Pete

#6 Mert

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 03:29 AM

IMHO looks like a mountain top still in the dark side
already hit by sunlight.

#7 smitty0

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 04:43 AM

Understood - i think is peak of Mons Herodotus. His albedo is very high. Snow cap :)

#8 Mirzam

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 08:46 AM

If you wanted to analyze the possibility that this was a hot source (i.e. active volcano) you could make measurements at multiple wavelengths, including IR, and compare the shape of the pseudo-radiance curve with the shapes from other illuminated areas of the Moon. (Pseudo-radiance because you have not corrected for the filter transmission). If the "volcano" has a stronger red-IR response versus other areas it may be due to a higher surface temperature. The other possible cause would be a difference in rock composition, but this is likely to be relatively subtle in a radiance measurement.

I don't think it is a volcano, but just wanted to point out that amateurs could easily collect data to characterize these sorts of features if so inclined.

JimC

#9 AlanL

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 01:01 PM

JimC - I like your thinking!

Conventional wisdom is the moon is geologically inactive. If this is an active volcano, it would be the first we have seen!

#10 Mirzam

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 01:48 PM

Actually, an even simpler way to monitor the Moon for hotspots would be to create ratio images, for example, IR/G. There would be variations across the lunar surface, and no doubt noisy data within shadows (easily masked out), but extremely high values that appear localized to a small area would be interesting to examine more closely.

Of course you might have to persist for a long time to discover anything (Hundreds, thousands, millions of years?)

JimC






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