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selenology today 32

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#1 raffaello

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 02:54 AM

it is online new issue of Selenology Today #32, the free journal of GLR group, with a new layout

The issue is present here
http://digilander.libero.it/glrgroup/



Thanks to George for new work done allowing this new issue to be released and all coauthors. enjoi!

A remark on our recent published book is also included

Raffaello

#2 azure1961p

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 06:54 PM

I was wondering where this issue was - thank you Raf!

Pete

#3 RobertED

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 09:48 PM

Thank You very much!!, Raf!!

#4 raffaello

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 09:47 AM

thanks to you all-
my last data and images are updated in my webpage here
http://glrgroup2.blogspot.it/

Raf

#5 azure1961p

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 09:59 AM

Would you like to give a synopsis of what's in store for the reader with this issue?

Pete

#6 raffaello

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 11:33 AM

if is your comment on ST32 it is welcome. If you mean a general overview of the issues here the contents
1) Observations on the uprange ejecta of oblique angle impact craters
by Barry FitzGerald

Oblique impacts are known to produce a suite of features within the ejecta blanket and on the
planforms of the resulting craters. These changes only become evident at shallow impact angles, with
initially the ejecta becoming sparse uprange, and then with the progressive appearance of a Zone of
Avoidance (ZoA) or Forbidden Zone in the uprange direction, where ejecta appears to be poorly
developed or absent. The crater planform remains circular at these impact angles and only departs from
the axisymmetric at extremely low angles. The edges of theses ZoA's are in many cases defined by
conspicuous rays which can, in some cases have a positive relief core, which survives as a topographic
feature long after the bright ray material has become inconspicuous due to space weathering. The
current article discusses this process, and relates it to features observed in the uprange ejecta blankets
of a number of craters of proposed low angle origin. These features form uprange ridges which appear
to form in the transition regime between craters that form ZoA,s and craters that exhibit more
asymmetric ejecta such as the well known 'butterfly' pattern of crossrange rays.

2) LEAVING NO DOME UNTURNED
Review reprint from LPOD by C. Wood

Over the last ten years or so a small international group of professionals in various fields relentlessly
imaged, measured and analysed lunar domes. They started with their own images and traditional
techniques, and embraced new data and tools as they became available from orbiting spacecraft to refine
their calculations and increase the types of knowledge gained. Early on simply getting an accurate
determination of dome height and slope was a significant advance, and now they routinely estimate
surface compositions, eruption conditions and geophysical constraints of dome formation. It is not an
exaggeration to say that with the publication of the first book devoted exclusively to domes that Raf,
Christian, Jim and Maria Teresa have become the world's leading experts on these small volcanoes. The
first third of the book is technical, reflecting its origin in papers the team has published in professional
journals, The rest is a mare by mare observer's guide to many dozens of domes, each illustrated with
spacecraft and amateur images, and derived topographic profiles. The book is not for the casual
observer, but both the professional lunar geologist and the advanced amateur will want it as a compact
handbook of virtually everything we know of some of the Moon's most illusive features.
These same four people are the leaders of the Geological Lunar Researches Group that has recently
published the 31st issue of Selenology Today, a high level journal that provides opportunities for
amateurs to publish new research on the Moon. Congratulations to GLR for ST and Lunar Domes.


3) On the imaged short and narrow rille near Rima Sheepshanks
by KC Pau and R. Lena

During a survey we detected a small fine rille to the south of the main Rima Sheepshanks. The unnamed rille,
likely an extension of the rille segment from Rima Gartner, was initially detected in 2003 with a Toucam
camera. We report our imagery displaying the narrow rille, which is shown in the LROC WAC imagery and
Clementine imagery.

4) Unusual Crater Ejecta Feature
by Barry FitzGerald

Impact crater ejecta takes a wide variety of forms including rays and secondary craters which are produced
by the excavation of target material and their expulsion from the transient cavity during crater formation. The
material excavated in most cases ends up distributed more or less symmetrically around the crater, with
only very low angle impacts producing asymmetric distributions. Infrequently an ejecta field will strongly
reflect the azimuthal direction of the impactor, with features such as a Zone of Avoidance or Forbidden Zone
in the uprange direction (such as Proclus) or conspicuous downrange rays (such as Messier A) forming.
The current article describes an unusual uprange feature which takes the form of a linear gouge extending
away from a small (~1.2km) very oblique angle crater on the south eastern rim of Vasco da Gamma B.

5) Torricelli
by Richard Hill
This is a region of irregular craters from Hypatia on the left edge to Isidorus B

Raf






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