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dSLR and 8SE questions/advice

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#1 ben2112

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 10:17 PM

I got a great deal on a T2i. I know I'll need a T-Ring but I am not sure if I should get adapter that goes directly on the back of the OTA or get the one that goes into where the eyepiece goes. I plan on getting the Celestron FR.

Also, does an autoguider really help that much on an alt/az mount? Right now, the only thing I am going to be taking pics of, besides the moon and planets, will be DSOs like M42 and M31.

#2 rockstarbill

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 10:32 PM

You need the T Adapter and the Ring.

Links:
http://www.amazon.co...03VS3XDO/ref...

http://www.amazon.co.../dp/B00009X3...

I have never used guiding on Alt-Az mounts, so I cannot help you there. I can say that guided is better than not for DSO's.

#3 Sorny

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 11:13 PM

Chances are you wont be able to go any longer than 30 seconds with an SE mount. Even then, your reject rate will be very high. The SE mount is great for visual use, but it is not an astro-photography mount by any stretch of the meaning.

Planetary/lunar AP is definitely doable with the SE (bright objects that don't take long to expose). DSO, not so much.

#4 AstroTatDad

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 01:38 AM

Hey Ben,

You have been doing awesome photos of Saturn with your NI5 by the way.

Ok when I first got my 6se not to long after I bought the Celestron T-Ring and T-Adapter also the Celestron 6.3 FR. I messed around a few times with the use of the SE mount. 30 seconds was pushing it IMO, I found 20 maybe 25 seconds was ok. I just wasn't impressed, it works..but! It just didn't seem worth it to me especially battling LP. Don't get me wrong I have seen some nice images members have done with there SE mounts.

So I put my attachments away until I could get an "OK" AP rig. It's been months now and I just finally picked up a used CG5-GT Advance mount, it's not the best out there but I thought it would be a good start since I'm using a small/mid size SCT. I gave up a few times before getting this mount, I almost bought a whole new scope/mount/tripod it was so tempting but that would have set me back BIG time.
So to make a long story short, besides the stuff I already have... my used CG5 and SSAG - Mag mini http://www.telescope...e/p/99631.ut...
well set me back $675 not to bad I must say, can even go a little cheaper way on a guide setup but I like that package. So now with my 6" sct, CG5, auto guider and all the other goodies, I have a "decent" AP rig. :)

So there is cheaper ways to work especially if you already own items you can use. :)

Still give it a go with your SE mount, you have a DSLR now and you need those adapters no matter what.. give it a shot. :) just know its going to be very limited "tons of shorts and teeth biting post processing" lol "jokes" :grin:

Now I have to learn how to use all this stuff... Oh boy can't wait! :roflmao:

#5 ben2112

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 06:14 AM

I know the SE mount isn't designed for DSO AP. But I have seen some pretty decent pics from people using the SE mount for brighter DSOs,and that is what I am going to try.

Jeff - Thanks for the kind comments about my Saturn pics. :) I am not finished with my NI5 yet. I am still looking forward to getting pics of Jupiter and Mars. :jump: Right now, I am saving up to get the VX mount and an autoguider.

I know that AP is a rabbit hole. But I don't want to jump down it, I want to ease my way down.

#6 nodalpoint

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 08:32 AM

The t-adapter and DSLR will be great for pix of the moon, but beyond that I think the effort outweighs the returns from what's possible using a "proper" mount for imaging.

#7 Midnight Dan

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 09:10 AM

I got a great deal on a T2i. I know I'll need a T-Ring but I am not sure if I should get adapter that goes directly on the back of the OTA or get the one that goes into where the eyepiece goes. I plan on getting the Celestron FR.

Also, does an autoguider really help that much on an alt/az mount? Right now, the only thing I am going to be taking pics of, besides the moon and planets, will be DSOs like M42 and M31.


Forget about guiding. Its purpose is to track accurately for long exposures, but the mount can't do long exposures anyway.

For the T adapters, you can really go either way. Technically, the SCT-to-T adapter (connects directly to the back) is the better way to go. It puts the camera more precisely on axis, and will provide a more solid connection. You may need or want an extension tube to put the camera closer to the designed back focus point of 100mm so as to get closer to the correct focal length. BUT, all this is important only if you're getting serious and picky about your photos which, with an SE mount, you're probably not.

The 2" nosepiece adapter also has some advantages. First it allows you to mount the camera in a 2" diagonal, which puts it at 90° to the OTA and can allow a little more clearance at the base. It also allows you to use a variety of barlows designed for eyepiece use, which is handy for planetary imaging.

The only thing I would avoid using is a 1.25" nosepiece adapter. The connection is a bit on the weak side to hold a DSLR in place, and it constricts the light path and vignettes the outer portion.

So, if you have a 2" diagonal, I'd probably suggest the 2" nosepiece adapter as the more versatile arrangement. If you don't have a 2" diagonal, you may want to consider getting one. If that's a bit too pricey right now and you don't need to use a barlow, the SCT-to-T adapter is a good option.

-Dan

#8 Tel

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 09:38 AM

Hi Ben,

Just one guy's opinion but I'd say go ahead and get the "T" ring and the Celestron #93633-A "T" adapter and indeed, when finances allow, couple this assembly to that Celestron 6.3 FR.

This combination should give you a good wide field suitable for DSO imaging, within reason, from an Alt./Az. mount: (with the possibility of little vignetting, but which processing should be able to take care of).

With these wide field producing accessories however, you should be able to minimise the effects of field rotation proportional to the exposure time you allow: (but you'll need to experiment along these lines).

On the other hand though, for good photographic effect, you will need to pick your DSO targets carefully.

Something like, for example a wide-ish galaxy span, such as you suggest, M31: (although I think you'll be lucky if you get this one all within the dimensions of the frame), will look fine.

In contrast however, the very small size "Ring Nebula" would, I'd suggest, be lost in the wide background of stars.

Hoping these comments help,

Best regards,
Tel

#9 Maverick199

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 11:41 AM

The t-adapter and DSLR will be great for pix of the moon, but beyond that I think the effort outweighs the returns from what's possible using a "proper" mount for imaging.


Include Planets as well. The Nexstar series should be more than adequate. Of course there are folks here who have taken outstanding images of deep space objects but that's a learning curve.

#10 AstroTatDad

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 06:22 PM

I know the SE mount isn't designed for DSO AP. But I have seen some pretty decent pics from people using the SE mount for brighter DSOs,and that is what I am going to try.

Jeff - Thanks for the kind comments about my Saturn pics. :) I am not finished with my NI5 yet. I am still looking forward to getting pics of Jupiter and Mars. :jump: Right now, I am saving up to get the VX mount and an autoguider.

I know that AP is a rabbit hole. But I don't want to jump down it, I want to ease my way down.


:) awesome AVX will be nice, that's the way I was going to go until I found the CG5 GTA used cheap. Are you looking for new or used?

like I said since you have a dslr get those adapters for now and use your SE mount. It will work. people have nice images. I was just bad with it, lol. but again I didn't try that much I just said I will wait lol.
now if I can get clear skies to start messing around. lots to learn ahead. :)

#11 rockstarbill

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 06:45 PM

Good luck! I too have been learning quite a bit about all of this. :)

#12 ben2112

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 07:40 PM

Dan - That is what I thought about autoguiding with an alt/az. What I'll do the SCT to T adapter then. I don't have a 2in diagonal. Which means, unless I do a rail mod, I can't do any pics at Zenith. Which is fine.

Tel - As always, your advice is always welcome. When I get it all setup, I'll just have to play around with it and see what I can take pics of. I am not expecting much. I guess I am a glutton for punishment. :lol:

Maverick - I'll be playing around with it. I like pushing things to their limits.

Jeff - I am looking for new, but I'll buy used if I can find a good deal on one.






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