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New nova in delphinus

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#101 Special Ed

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 05:47 AM


I've never posted in this forum but I admire what you folks do.

At 0150 8/20 UT (9:50 PM EDT 8/19), I observed the nova through my 10x50 binoculars. Estimated mag is 5.1-5.2 as compared to eta Sge (mag 5.0). Transparency was very good but the bright Moon allowed only the stars of the Summer Triangle to be visible.


{Edit: I accidently posted this in the wrong thread the other day so I'm trying to correct that. It appears that my magnitude estimate is a liitle brighter than Rich's and John's for the same time period.]

#102 elleng

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 12:05 PM

Having great fun watching and recording the brightness changes. Will also send my results to the AAVSO and BAA VSS later.

I've found a nice chart for estimating the magnitude of nova DEL

http://www.freestarc...s/188-nova-d...

#103 BrooksObs

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 10:22 PM

Looks like Nova Del 2013 is declining at a rate of between 0.2 and 0.3 magnitudes per day. I got 5.6 just about an hour ago.

BrooksObs

#104 Aquarellia

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 04:47 AM

I agree BrooksObs
I got 5.7 at 22:10 UT aug 21st.
Here a picture made from France SW (Brax observatory)
This picture was done Aug 20, 21UT by 3 friends of mine
Michel Sarrau, Michel Lefèvre and Antoine Altura
They use an Atik Caméra (16hr) Televue refractor 101 NPIs - 570mm. Total pose 10 x 3 min

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#105 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 05:27 AM

Observed N Del 2013 last evening (8/21) under bright, hazy skies. Estimated magnitude 5.5.

Rich (RLTYS)

#106 Hubert

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 06:31 AM

My estimation last night was also 5.5.

#107 John_G

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 06:47 AM

Should be easily visible to the naked eye next week before moon rise. Even on the 24th there might be a 10 or 15 minute opportunity for viewing.

#108 dgg99

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 06:56 AM

I estimated also magnitude 5.5 last night at around 22:20 UT.

#109 Dean Norris

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 03:32 PM

I estimated the nova's magnitude last night at 5.6 at 5:45 UT 8/22/13.

Here's an estimate from the 19th that i didn't get around to posting till now - 5.0 at 6:30 UT 8/19/13.

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#110 nytecam

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 03:49 AM

My pic from last night Aug 22 through drifting cloud - my estimate mag 5.5 against circled star and Sloan DSS :grin:

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#111 BrooksObs

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 07:46 AM

Extrapolating this morning from the near 10,000 brightness estimates reported so far to the AAVSO suggests that Nova Del's magnitude will have subsided to very near 6.0 by the time darkness falls over the U.S. this evening. The decline rate in the lightcurve's slope continues, remaining close to 0.25 magnitudes per day since August 20.10UT. Thus, it looks like Nova Del's show for the unaided eye is probably about over.

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#112 Bakes

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 09:00 PM

I just set up the dob in the backyard. Through the 9x50 finder, Nova Del 2013 looks like a good match with HR7839. Listed on the AAVSO chart as 6.2 mag.

But I am not the most skilled observer. What do others think?

#113 John_G

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 10:53 PM

Just after sunset and and a few minutes before moon rise I made and estimate of 6.0 with binoculars.

#114 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 07:02 AM

I observed N Del 2013 last evening (8/23) at mag 5.7 using comp stars 57 and 64.

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#115 VanJan

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 11:19 AM

At 1 AM EDT on 8/24/13 with 8x42 binoculars, I estimated the magnitude at 6.0, using comparison stars of 5.9, 6.1, and 6.2.

#116 BrooksObs

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 04:44 PM

It is becoming ever clearer that Nova Del's rise must have been very steep for a "slow" nova. The latest data provided through the AAVSO indicates that the nova was still fainter than at least magnitude 11.0 on Aug. 13.96UT, just a day and a half prior to the nova's discovery.

Considering that the rise occurred almost immediately following the scheduled peak of the Perseid meteor shower, one thing surprises me. Given that countless amateurs must have been out documenting the meteor shower with cameras of all sorts for several nights either side of the peak, it is a bit perplexing that as yet no positive observations of the rising nova have so far been reported. Will such yet come to light, I wonder?

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#117 Special Ed

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 11:34 PM

Hello,

At 0200 8/25 UT using 12x36 IS II binoculars, I estimated the nova magnitude at 6.2 using nearby stars of mag 6.1, 6.4, and 5.7. The Moon had not yet risen. I also made this animation of the nova fading.

#118 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 07:11 AM

Observed N Del last night (8/24) and estimated its mag at 5.9 using comp stars 57 and 64.

Rich (RLTYS)

#119 John_G

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 08:08 AM

Made an estimate last night with my 8x40s. Mine was 6.1 using magnitude 61 and 62 comparison stars.

#120 SabiaJD

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 08:16 AM

Observed Nova Del 2013 in early evening sky last night August 24, 2013 EDT 9:14 pm from my backyard. With dark sky condition, low humidity and cool temperature, the nova was considerable dimmer than my previous views of it.

Used the stars from AAVSO 12508BUL chart to determine the magnitude of the nova has dropped to mag 6.0.

#121 Dean Norris

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 02:30 PM

Here's my last 3 estimations of the nova's magnitude:

5.8 on 5 UT 8/23/13
6.1 on 5 UT 8/24/13
6.2 on 5:45 UT 8/25/13

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#122 canukLX90

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 02:21 AM

Finally a clear night sky to view this wonder. Easily
visible in the 8X50 finder. If it wasn't for the clouds
I probably would have seen my first naked eye nova when it
was at its peak.

10 X 30 seconds at ISO 800 / F 2.8 PowerNewt / no processing
taken on the night of the 24th

PJ

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#123 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 05:29 AM

Observed N Del 2013 last night (8/25) using comp stars 57 and 61 I estimated the magnitude at 6.0. N Del's rate of fadeing seems to have slowed down.

Rich (RLTYS)

#124 SabiaJD

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 12:57 PM

It is becoming ever clearer that Nova Del's rise must have been very steep for a "slow" nova. The latest data provided through the AAVSO indicates that the nova was still fainter than at least magnitude 11.0 on Aug. 13.96UT, just a day and a half prior to the nova's discovery.

Considering that the rise occurred almost immediately following the scheduled peak of the Perseid meteor shower, one thing surprises me. Given that countless amateurs must have been out documenting the meteor shower with cameras of all sorts for several nights either side of the peak, it is a bit perplexing that as yet no positive observations of the rising nova have so far been reported. Will such yet come to light, I wonder?

BrooksObs


That is a good question. A 35mm SLR (film) with 50mm lens on a tracking platform will record stars to 10 magnitude. I have used such a setup to record the variable star U Sagitta on film. Modern DSLR camera with 50mm to 85mm does this with ease on a tracking platform. At the present time I do not own a DSLR camera, just a "point and shoot" with zoom features.

So why have no pre discovery images come to light? Poor record keeping practice comes to mind. Only the images that contain a meteor were kept, the rest were deleted. If all of the images made it from the camera storage device to a computer or storage then there is s better chance that one or more may have the area of the nova.
To identify the region of the sky the images were taken would be difficult task to any one who is not familiar with the constellations. More difficult if a written or verbal record was not taken during the sessions. Novice would have a hard time knowing what area of the sky the images show.

I have assisted many people with DSLRs on tripod image the sky, very few could identify the bright stars of Cassiopeia in their photos.

Looking at the meteor images posted on www.spaceweather.com for any pre discovery of Nova DEL 2013 finds very few with Delphinius in the image.

These are worth a look. I question the dates on some of these; local, UT or uploaded date? EXIF file with no information usually indicates a processed image.

http://spaceweather....upload_id=85358 Nova not visible

http://spaceweather....upload_id=85318 ?

http://spaceweather....upload_id=85487 ?

#125 BrooksObs

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 06:35 PM

Hey, John, how ya doing? I think I've pinned down the explanation for a lack of positive imagining of the nova prior to its discovery.

It looks to me increasingly likely that most of the nova's rise between perhaps magnitude 12, or fainter, and its 6.8 discovery brightness must have taken place during just the hours when it was evening over the mid Pacific Basin on August 14th UT (the discovery coming on August 14.58UT). This is certainly what the improving negative observations are implying now.

Such timing would severely limit the number of potential ground station observers who might have been imaging the sky at the critical time. We do know with certainty now that the nova was still fainter than, and not detected, at magnitude 11.0 on August 13.96UT and fainter than 8.0 on August 14.21UT. Thus, the rise must have been very steep, perhaps surprisingly so for a rather "slow" nova, occurring at the least favorable longitude on the Earth for it being discovered during its rise.

BrooksObs






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