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Post a Picture of You and Your Classic Scope Pt.2

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#151 actionhac

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 09:46 PM

He's just balancing there, but that is about maximum angle of elevation for him! Glowy and I go way back. I can charge him up with a light bulb and he glows all night.


#152 TexasSky

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 09:22 PM

Holy cow!....now that's a collection!....thanks for posting....I now have the ammo to show my wife and say "see, I'm not the only one, and i'm not nearly as bad as that guy"

#153 nexstar11

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 12:32 AM

:grin: Here's my 1980 diecast with 5.5" Schmidt piggybacked and C90 droped down opposite. Nikon F2 with DW finder

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#154 PiSigma

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 01:24 PM

Hi Lev. Welcome to the Classic Telescope forum.

Very cool rig you have there.

#155 terraclarke

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 02:21 PM

Me and my early Unitron #152 (4 inch F15).

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#156 akman1955

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 03:21 PM

:)UUUh OOOh! Terra has got the dreaded Unitron collecting sickness :grin: No known cure untill death. :lol: and you can only treat it by buying more unitrons :foreheadslap:

#157 terraclarke

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 05:34 PM

:praying: :praying:

#158 Qwickdraw

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 08:38 AM

Very nice Terra. I am curious if you have more scopes than corners of rooms?

#159 terraclarke

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 11:44 AM

I have twelve classic long focus refractors Guy, with six on display. I have the scope of my dreams in each class, 60mm, 76mm and 102mm, including my all time Holy Grail of telescopes. All my classics periodically rotated from display into use. My collection is complete as are my available corners.

In fact, I have a rule now. One comes, one goes. My 4 inch Unitron came and my orange tube C8 went. It's the only way to keep a manageable and meaningful collection IMHO.

#160 gelkin

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 02:29 PM

:lol: :grin:

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#161 actionhac

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 02:32 PM

Lately I've been observing Jupiter and with my RV-6 which does a fantastic job with winter conditions. This morning after thinking about it I've decided to bring out the ALLENscope.
You classic people really should try out a long newt they are very interesting. The ALLEN mirror in this one is from a time when these long focal length newts were popular back in the old days when amateurs did a lot more planetary solar system observing.

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#162 terraclarke

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 02:44 PM

That's cool Robert, it is an F12? I have the optics waiting to build a 6 inch F10. I remember thinking about building a 6 inch F12 back in the day after I built my 6 inch F4.5. I used Thompson's "Making Your Own Telescope" as my guide and he mentioned making an F12 planetary Newt.

#163 actionhac

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 03:11 PM

Its 12.8, 1921mm focal length. There was a time when these mirrors could be purchased commercially made. This one though is amateur made as far as I know. All I know about it is I won it on ebay years ago, it has scribed ALLEN on the back, and a Clausing Beral coating sticker.
I've had lots of fun experimenting and trying out ideas with this mirror and learned a lot about the old ways. The old amateurs were a very smart bunch, lots of great ideas back then were used that have fallen out of favor or forgotten but all the information is recorded in history and old books and photos, etc.

Robert

#164 Bob Myler

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 05:40 PM

For a moment there Gerald, I thought you were Wilson of Home Improvement standing behind those Unitrons.... :cool:

#165 GoodAsh

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 06:01 PM

Hey! I bought a Unitron from the guy hiding back there!

#166 youngamateur42

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 06:27 PM

Love the long Newt Robert. Back in the day, at least in Fresno, all the homemade scopes were F/10+. This is 1950's and 60's. My grandpa's first telescope he ever made was a 6" F/12. A little later he made a 4.25" F/12, which he still has. One of his mentors, Jackson Carle, had an 8" F/12 Newtonian. My grandpa and his friends would go down to see Glynn Reavis, who made the finest most stable mountings I had ever seen. They would all go down there to his house and grind mirrors. Mr. Reavis would set up oil barrels for grinding mirrors. He actually had a class there. Had a focault tester, access to water, etc. The scope in the attached photo is the 4.25" F/12, mount was made by Mr. Reavis. Taken by me 2 weeks ago.

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#167 Pat Rochford

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 06:40 PM

Terra, I don't think you'll have any regrets when your 6" F/10 when it is finally born. I doubt you'll see much difference between the star images in it and your 4" F/15.

I made mine about five years ago ... took a very long time, as I continually over-corrected the parabola. Hard to believe just a couple of strokes can take you too far. The upside though, was that in the process the surface became extremely smooth. And as I mentioned previously, very refractor-like star images.

Pat Rochford

#168 actionhac

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 06:46 PM

Very cool scope and mount Justin. It must be wonderful to have it in the family after all the years that have gone by.
I love the short tripods they used back then it gives the scopes such a fifties style, and especially the silver too, very neat scope.

#169 ngc2289

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 07:02 PM

That is a really GREAT scope!!!!!!!! :bow: :bow: :bow: :bow: :bow: :bow: :bow: :bow: :bow: :bow: :bow: :bow: :bow: :bow: :bow:

#170 youngamateur42

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 07:03 PM

I posted a whole buncha pictures of pictures of it in the ATM forum, have a look.

#171 akman1955

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 01:36 PM

I have twelve classic long focus refractors Guy, with six on display. I have the scope of my dreams in each class, 60mm, 76mm and 102mm, including my all time Holy Grail of telescopes. All my classics periodically rotated from display into use. My collection is complete as are my available corners.

In fact, I have a rule now. One comes, one goes. My 4 inch Unitron came and my orange tube C8 went. It's the only way to keep a manageable and meaningful collection IMHO.



You don't have this yet :grin: :lol:

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#172 akman1955

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 01:38 PM

:lol: :grin:


Gerald.. I have one of those on this :grin:

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#173 actionhac

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Posted 21 March 2014 - 10:56 AM

Snow melt in the yonder Cascade mountains and rainfall flood the valley, its a normal occurrence here. I have been enjoying particularly good astronomy lately like the E star in the Trapezium and 3 Plato craterlets. It might be the mass of water giving me a more stable air or its probably the ultra excellent Edmund Scientific 6" reflector shown here.

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#174 clintwhitman

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 03:06 AM

Great shot Robert! Seeing the e in the trap is always a good sign!
(aveman

#175 RacerX69

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 01:45 PM

Lately I've been observing Jupiter and with my RV-6 which does a fantastic job with winter conditions. This morning after thinking about it I've decided to bring out the ALLENscope.
You classic people really should try out a long newt they are very interesting. The ALLEN mirror in this one is from a time when these long focal length newts were popular back in the old days when amateurs did a lot more planetary solar system observing.


That's an interesting pier mount you have there. Does he stand still enough for you to observe the night skies well?

:grin:






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