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Suggestions for eyepiece for Starblast 6

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#1 BeardedDragon

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 04:09 PM

Hi,
My first post here and wanted to get suggestions for a low-power, wide-field eyepiece for the Orion Starblast 6 (which includes the Plossl 10mm and 25mm eyepieces).
If you can get one eyepiece ($100 maximum), which one would be the best for low-power, wide views - i'm most interested in viewing star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies.
Thanks.

#2 Lamb0

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 05:36 PM

:wavey: Welcome to Cloudy Nights! :dob:

Although it's very close to your 10mm Plossl, for <$100 the 11mm 82° field waterproof 1.25" eyepiece is a very nice choice that would make a great "workhorse" eyepiece with a >1.2° TFoV (True Field of View) @ 68x with a 2.2mm exit pupil. Call and mention you're a CN member for additional $aving$. A ~$33 32mm Plossl for a >2° TFoV would also be a useful addition as a "finder" eyepiece - the Pleiades will fit with room to spare for more nebulosity, though Andromeda is even bigger. The 32mm Plossl is quite appropriate to use with the ~$80 NPB 1.25" – DGM Optics™ Nebula Astronomy Filter to view nebulae such as the Veil and North American! :bigshock:

#3 BeardedDragon

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 09:12 PM

Thanks for the reply - that EP is HUGE!

#4 Lamb0

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 02:04 AM

:john: Compared to Plossls? L=87mm x W=48mm; weight=279 grams; 9.8 oz. Yes. :sumo:

#5 AngryHandyman

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 09:47 AM

The ES line as linked above sure would be a nice addition. If that's out of your price range, for less than half the price consider Agena Astro's 66 degree Enhanced Wide Angle eyepieces. Good eye relief and comfortable field of view. The 6mm, 9mm perform very well. I use the 15mm a lot, and the 20mm not so much as it's a bit of a mess on the outer edges in the fast astroblast, but is fine in my C11. I also have a 32mm plossl and it's a nice addition, but I'd recommend higher powers first since the 25mm plossl does nicely for wide views.

In between the Expanse clones like the agena Astro ewa, and the ES 82'S, paradigm 's are often recommended. And of course you can go higher with Hyperions, pentax,Televue and more...but they're out if my realm! There's certainly a lot of choices at just about any price point.

Good luck!

#6 Ed D

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 09:57 AM

A 32mm Plossl meets all of your criteria. With the money left over I suggest a 2x barlow. Any of the better known brand name eyepieces and barlows are fine, like Celestron, GSO, Meade, etc.

Ed D

#7 BeardedDragon

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 11:40 AM

Thanks, one of the guys told me about Agena Astro and the SWA and EWA lines look great and the prices too.

#8 galexand

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 04:01 PM

For my StarBlast 6, in pursuit of widest field I wound up with an Astro-Tech Paradigm 25mm. It gets 30x with an apparent field of view of 60 degrees, for a true field of view at 2 degrees, which I think is pretty much the maximum for a 750mm scope with a 1.25" focuser (without vignetting). I'm happy with it. I think it has a little field curvature (objects in the center of the field come to focus at a slightly different point than objects at the edge of field, but my eye can generally accomodate it), and you definitely get a better image if your eye is precisely centered. It is always the first EP I put in the scope, and I generally use it for all hopping.

Compared to the 1.7 degrees of the 25mm plossl, it is a notable upgrade. I *really* like the 25mm plossl, so every now and then I do go back and say "surely the plossl didn't have this problem", but every time I do I am reminded again why i prefer the paradigm...it's just really unobtrusive and gives you that extra wide field.

I didn't get a 32mm plossl because I got to borrow a 40mm plossl and did not like it. The advantage of lower magnification is that large diffuse objects (galaxies) are easier to see in low magnification, but in my specific light pollution conditions (in a city), my best bet on a galaxy is actually about 45x (17mm). 30x is already too low magnification to cut through the sky glow meaningfully.

There was (still is?) someone in the classifieds here dumping a pile of ?Apollo? "ganymede erfle" 26mm wide fields (58 deg afov), which gives a similar view to the Paradigm, for a *very* low price...but I prefer the Paradigm because the erfle has a little ghosting on bright stars.

I didn't get one of the "Expanse clones" because they review best at 6mm and 9mm, while I wanted real wide field view.

I was a little too cheap to get an explore scientific eyepiece (like 24mm 68deg), but since the 'sweet spot' for diffuse objects seems to be a little higher magnification than that, I am kind of drawn now to the 14mm 82deg EPs...still a somewhat wide a view (1.5 degrees), but much higher magnification.

Can you tell it's been too hazy to take out the SB6 for the last week... :)

#9 BeardedDragon

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 04:19 PM

I'll take a look at the Paradigm, thanks.
Yea, high powers with the fast scopes don't seem to work too well and i'm mostly interested in deep sky objects anyway. The Agena Astro wide view EP's look very good and very affordable though.
And yes, it's been very cloudy & hazy here in NY and haven't been skygazing much this month but i've used my Orion GoScope 80 to do some decent land and sea viewing!

#10 Dave Ittner

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 10:55 PM

Interesting scope. Do you set it on a table in order to be comfortable?

#11 Robert Cook

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 01:03 AM

In between the Expanse clones like the agena Astro ewa, and the ES 82'S, paradigm 's are often recommended. And of course you can go higher with Hyperions, pentax,Televue and more...but they're out if my realm! There's certainly a lot of choices at just about any price point.


The Baader Hyperion series may be more expensive than many of the ES82s, currently, but the ES82 series (and the ES68 series, for that matter) are better corrected--sharper across the field of view and more contrasty. The main advantage that the Hyperion series has over them is consistent and generally greater eye relief for those who need/prefer it (in addition to some other features).

#12 BeardedDragon

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 06:50 AM

I have an 18" high plastic table I set it on (it's a sturdy kiddie table) and sit on a small step stool and it seems to work well. First time I set it on the driveway and kneeled (with kneepads) to view and changed my mind fast :tonofbricks:. With my GoScope 80mm refractor I set the scope on top of a wooden stool and use a small chair. Accessing the eyepiece is the most challenging thing about using Reflector telescopes which many people don't realize until it's ready to use and you say "ok, how the hell do I look through this thing..." but you just have to be creative and find the right solution for you.

#13 Dave Ittner

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 08:45 AM

One thing you might want to check out is a grinder stand. I picked one up from Harbor Freight Tools for around $30. They are compact, have a nice square flat surface to work with, and tear down for easy transport. Plus they are small enough that you can move all around them.

Now your scope may be a tad too heavy for the grinder stands that HF offers, so this is just the idea of using something that acts like a Pier mount than anything.

Tables tend to be too large and cumbersome.

#14 BeardedDragon

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 08:52 AM

Thanks for that info.
What i'm doing is looking for a small particle board nightstand (relatively light) for cheap on Craigslist. There are always people selling those things but many are heavy wood. I'm sure i'll find one soon just in time for the prime Fall viewing season!

#15 mark379

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 01:39 PM

There are a couple of choices that come to mind.
Cheapest is 32 mm plossl
Best option could either be a Baddar 24 mm 68 deg e/p or a explore scientific 24 mm 68 deg or meade superwide 24 mm 68 degree used...
they show up from time to time. Your background may be a little bit darker that way and be able to pick out fainter stars. You'll have the same field of view as a 32 mm plossl.






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