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NGC 7130 in PSA and Photoshop Elements 11

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#1 stevecoe

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 02:53 AM

Howdy all;

I am learning lots about using Photoshop Elements 11 to make my drawings better. This is a sketch of NGC 7130 in Pisces Austrinus. NGC 7135 is to the left and IC 5131 is to the right. The drawing was made years ago with my 13 inch Newtonian at 165X.

I used the "Scratch and Dust" filter and then rounded out the stars which were out of round. I need to learn a little more about how to smooth out the glow of the galaxies and nebulae in my drawings. Ah, there is always more to know. If there is someone with a suggestion about how to smooth out the galaxy, let me know.

Regardless, I am happy with the progress so far.

Thanks for all the help I have received here;
Steve Coe

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#2 Asbytec

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 04:52 AM

Steve, I know jack about Photoshop. But, I'm sure it has many of the same features as some of the paint programs I use. One can "pick" a background color and paint one pixel at a time. I was thinking maybe "pick" your background color, then use a pencil tool to paint those pixels surrounding each star that give it an oblong form.

Another option might be to size a pencil, or whatever tool can make a small circular spot, completely cover over a star, then re-paint it the appropriate size (and color, even.)

As for taking a scanned nebula, yea, would have to experiment with that one. You might be able to "spray" paint some pixels of either background color or nebula color of varying saturation to get a nice re-touching effect.

When you're done, you might even invert the colors, background becomes nearly black with a brighter nebula within it. Again, color is an option. You can get some pretty soft hues.

I do planets, but here's an idea of what PC paint can do. Maybe even touching up scans of pencil sketches. In effect, you'd be using the original scan to re-create a "painted" version, if that's what you want to do in terms of saturation, hue, rounding out the stars, and maybe softening the nebula.

Otherwise, just making the stars round might simply require single pixel manipulation with the background color. If you make a mistake, just "undo."

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#3 Asbytec

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 05:23 AM

Here's a quick (i.e., could have taken more than 5 minutes to do a better job) over painting of your star images and inverting the background.

I left the nebula untouched. The background is softly uneven, so lightly over spraying the nebula proved difficult. Not impossible, tough, if that's a technique you want to use

Does Photoshop have some kind of a de-convolution algo?

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#4 stevecoe

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 01:52 AM

Norme;

Thanks for the input, I will look up some of the words you used and see what I can do. I like the star fill in by hand, the perfectly round stars are too "computerish";-)

I do like the idea of trying some color in the stars, I may add that later. There is always something new to do. I like your Jupiter, I might haul out some of my old sketches of the planets and see what can be done.

I may try the spray brush and see if I can get the galaxies a little smoother.

Thanks;
Steve Coe

#5 Asbytec

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 07:18 AM

Steve, sure, my quick and dirty stars are not realistic. They look like a star chart rather than the sky. But, the possibilities are many.

Importantly, bright stars don't have to be big. Just more saturated (completely white, for example.) Dimmer stars can be tad smaller and - less saturated or more gray (like the pair at left.)

You can blur the edges, flare them, and add rings and spikes if you want. As mentioned, soft colors, too (as at right.)

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