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Thinking of Meade LX80

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#51 gmartin02

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 07:55 PM

There is nothing wrong with having multiple scopes for multiple purposes - for the same reason you have both screwdrivers and pliers in a toolbox - different tools for different jobs.

I think for visual, the AVX/8" SCT will work great, and give you a lot deeper DSO views than a smaller APO refractor.

You could also try AP with the 8" SCT, but that is probably a hard way to start out trying to do astrophotography, as it would be for any long f/l scope.

Once you are ready for AP, you could get a very short focal length refractor to "get your feet wet" - something like an AT72ED. In my experience, the shorter the focal length you start with, the less frustrations you may encounter (balance, guiding accuracy, finding targets, etc.).

You can find tons of images on AstroBin using a CG-5 mount (the predecessor to the AVX). Here is a link to an imager on AstroBin that has some really good images taken with a 6" f/5 Netwonian mounted on a CG-5:

http://www.astrobin.com/users/Joanot/

If this class mount can handle a 6" reflector for AP, then a small APO (up to 4") should be no problem.

Greg

#52 orlyandico

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 08:14 PM

I think the AVX can handle an 8" SCT - but then that is f/10 and sloooooow. If you got the Optec 0.5X reducer it would become 1000mm FL and f/5 - much better. That reducer is not cheap and only covers an 18mm circle (e.g. Micro-4/3 camera or 8300 chip camera) but it's one approach..

I've also used a refractor 0.8X reducer on an SCT and it works well. You'd then get f/8 and 1600mm which I think is beyond the AVX capabilities for astrophotography..

#53 jrcrilly

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 08:20 PM

That reducer is not cheap and only covers an 18mm circle (e.g. Micro-4/3 camera or 8300 chip camera) but it's one approach..


You'd need more like a 25mm circle to cover an 8300 chip.

#54 Whichwayisnorth

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 08:39 PM

Just so you know Meade has stopped making the LX80 so any that a retailer may have is old stock. If you want the $799.00 LX80 and use it with a lighter OTA you may still find a vendor somewhere with one in the back room. Otherwise wait until the new version is released.

#55 rmollise

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 07:49 AM

I think the AVX can handle an 8" SCT - but then that is f/10 and sloooooow.


The VX can easily handle an 8-inch SCT for imaging or a C11 for visual. For a STANDARD SCT, just get the good, old Celestron reducer. Works fine, lasts a long time. :lol:

For an Edge? The new Celestron reducer is 299, about the same in real dollars that the original reducer cost in the early 1990s when it was new. ;)

#56 orlyandico

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 11:36 AM

well uncle Rod, i know you speak very highly of the standard hundred-buck f6.3 reducer, but my experience wasn't so great. Using a 0.8X refractor reducer yielded much better stars across the field (but then the reduction is also less). My experience with the f6.3 reducer was that there also was very strong vignetting even on APS-C. For all these reasons, I got rid of my f6.3 reducer...

#57 rmollise

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 01:10 PM

All I can say that I used the r/c successfully with both 35mm film, and with today's APS chips. Much depends on your individual configuration, of course so, as always "YMMV." If there is a fault in the original r/c for me, it's its tendency to reflections if bright stars are nearby. Still, back in the day it was quite an advance for me over the putrid .5 reducers I'd used before. ;)

#58 ur7x

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 10:29 PM

Just so you know Meade has stopped making the LX80 so any that a retailer may have is old stock. If you want the $799.00 LX80 and use it with a lighter OTA you may still find a vendor somewhere with one in the back room. Otherwise wait until the new version is released.


Really! We are all debating a mount that is basically "done"?

#59 Mkofski

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 10:39 PM

Just so you know Meade has stopped making the LX80 so any that a retailer may have is old stock. If you want the $799.00 LX80 and use it with a lighter OTA you may still find a vendor somewhere with one in the back room. Otherwise wait until the new version is released.


Really! We are all debating a mount that is basically "done"?


I don't think "done" has been decided yet. Will be soon but not just yet. Barring access to a time machine, the best Meade can do with this mount is to make it work like it should have at first. The worst that can happen is Meade disappears and those of us that have the mount are orphaned. Bad, but not the worse thing that has happened to me.

#60 cn register 5

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 04:55 AM

Can people please give some sort of evidence or source for the information they post so confidently.

It seems to be the sort of thing that the people at Meade who are in a position to know would be very discreet about allowing outside the factory - or telling the sales people.

It would give us an idea of how reliable this is, or if someone (not necessarily the poster) is making it up.

Chris






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