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NEW VIDEO ASTRONOMY CAMERA ADV MK II EXVIEWHAD II

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#1 mattflastro

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 12:27 PM

Astro-Video Systems is introducing a new video astronomy miniature camera , model Advanced MK II.
The new camera uses modern Sony ExviewHAD II CCDs and 32 bit ARM based DSP for highest performance at an unbeatable low cost.
Extreme high sensitivity, low noise , up to 85 sec in camera integration using in camera frame stacking, adjustable Gamma , color, brightness, sharpness , high resolution 960H unmatched by any other video camera on the market .
Did I mention the included remote handbox with manual gain control and gain display ?
The red glowing light under the gain display is the gain adjustment knob , functioning similar to a "volume" audio adjustment .
The camera is also controllable by PC via the included USB dongle .

More details here:
Advanced Cam MK II

See some UNPROCESSED , unstacked user captured images, taken with small scopes 4" to 6" range and at normal F ratios of F5 to F7 :

http://www.astro-vid...ser-images.html

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#2 Mark9473

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 12:44 PM

Quite a lot of C11 images in that small scope gallery. ;)
Would you happen to have, or could you produce, a video showing the live output on the screen when using this camera with a stationary telescope (i.e. on an alt-az mount)?

#3 mattflastro

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 12:55 PM

Quite a lot of C11 images in that small scope gallery. ;)
Would you happen to have, or could you produce, a video showing the live output on the screen when using this camera with a stationary telescope (i.e. on an alt-az mount)?

It doesn't say anywhere that ALL images are taken only with small scopes. But even the C11 images are taken at a slow F6.3 , the point being that the camera is supersensitive in order to get images using very short integration times .
I was mostly concerned to not show images taken with superfast scopes out of mere mortals range, such as 20" + dobs at F3 .

Your suggestion to post some videos is very good, thank you . I'll do it , upload them on Youtube and post the links here .

#4 mattflastro

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 01:05 PM

Here's the Advanced Cam MK II attached to a C8 :

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#5 core

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 05:50 PM

a video showing the live output on the screen when using this camera with a stationary telescope (i.e. on an alt-az mount)?


Unfortunately,it doesn't quite work this way; when you're integrating (ie, increasing the exposure into the 'seconds' range), the DSO target will drift across the field of view and will result in a 'smeared' output. If you mount a C-Lens that's equivalent to wide angle/standard (~24mm to ~80mm), you could get away with couple of seconds exposure on a tripod (stationary). With a Dob and long-integration video astronomy, you need tracking.

#6 mattflastro

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 10:23 PM

The Astro-Video Systems MK II camera is also the smallest video camera on the market , measuring less than 1.5" * 1.5" * 2" and weighs only 4.5 oz so it won't overload your mount or cause flexure in your optical train.

Here it is next to a standard size camera such as Samsung and most of the other video astronomy cams.

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#7 Mark9473

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Posted 15 September 2013 - 04:22 AM

a video showing the live output on the screen when using this camera with a stationary telescope (i.e. on an alt-az mount)?


Unfortunately,it doesn't quite work this way; when you're integrating (ie, increasing the exposure into the 'seconds' range), the DSO target will drift across the field of view and will result in a 'smeared' output. If you mount a C-Lens that's equivalent to wide angle/standard (~24mm to ~80mm), you could get away with couple of seconds exposure on a tripod (stationary). With a Dob and long-integration video astronomy, you need tracking.

That's exactly the point that I'd like to see demonstrated in a few videos. Is there a "short integration" setting that works, and what does it show?

#8 mattflastro

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Posted 15 September 2013 - 12:51 PM

a video showing the live output on the screen when using this camera with a stationary telescope (i.e. on an alt-az mount)?


Unfortunately,it doesn't quite work this way; when you're integrating (ie, increasing the exposure into the 'seconds' range), the DSO target will drift across the field of view and will result in a 'smeared' output. If you mount a C-Lens that's equivalent to wide angle/standard (~24mm to ~80mm), you could get away with couple of seconds exposure on a tripod (stationary). With a Dob and long-integration video astronomy, you need tracking.

That's exactly the point that I'd like to see demonstrated in a few videos. Is there a "short integration" setting that works, and what does it show?


Exactly how much star trailing and field rotation you get in an image depends on what part of the sky you're viewing.

Image brightness and scale depends on scope size and F ratio .
Integration time depends on all these variables , so it's hard to give a range of settings for a target.

All these being said, the Advanced MK II camera is capable of using shorter integration times for the same scope and target than other cameras .
That is because it's using the most sensitive CCD that's available today from Sony , icx672 ExviewHAD II .
It's sensitivity is rated by Sony at 2450mV .
For comparison, the venerable icx418 is rated by Sony at only 1300mV .
The camera also has lower noise and no amp glow, which allows higher gain to be employed , for shorter integration times.
A practical factor is between half and a quarter of other camera types integration time for the same scope and target.
Here's an explanation of star trail length calculation:

Star Trail Calculation

You may also use one of the online star trail calculators such as

Star Trail ONLINE Calculator

You'll need the target declination and scope plus camera parameters so beware of GIGO .

For comparison, all camera images that are posted on the Astro-Video Systems website are taken at integration times between 2 sec and 17 sec.

#9 Mark9473

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Posted 15 September 2013 - 05:14 PM

Thanks. Ultimately, the question is: how close is this to a DSO-capable electronic eyepiece. Looking forward to your videos.

#10 RichardHC

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 04:49 AM

Matt - a question about the new Peltier cooled unlimited integration APU - are you re-chipping the LN300s with the icx632/633 series chips or do they retain the icx672/673?

#11 mattflastro

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 04:01 PM

Matt - a question about the new Peltier cooled unlimited integration APU - are you re-chipping the LN300s with the icx632/633 series chips or do they retain the icx672/673?


The APU-1 is a brand new camera , the CCD boards are produced in Florida and the CCDs are bought and installed in my shop. There is only an external resemblance with Ln300 due to using the same aluminum extrusions for the enclosure , but this is not a LN300 camera. The APU-1 uses icx672/3 because of the increased resolution which gives a sharper and more detailed image. The icx672 is already more sensitive than other CCDs used in astronomy video cams and it was my decision to not use the icx672, which is even more sensitive but loses visibly in resolution .
And when I say visibly, it's very visible even on an old CRT TV that the icx672 is lower resolution.






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