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Aristarchus, 1963

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#1 Rick Woods

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 03:05 PM

Here's a link to where you can download a good article. It's an analysis of the 1963 TLP observation by Greenacre and Barr, published in the most recent Journal of the BAA.

http://www.the1963ar...chusevents.com/

#2 azure1961p

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 03:57 PM

Very nice article Rick and perhaps the most riveting moon rendering Ive ever seen.

Pete

#3 Rick Woods

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 07:56 PM

Yeah, I thought it was pretty good too. And the conclusion they came to - well, you could have knocked me over with a feather! :p

#4 cpsTN

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Posted 22 September 2013 - 12:43 PM

Darn. There are SO many places that I want "on the ground" pics of to get some perspective, ya know? THAT would really cool!

#5 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 22 September 2013 - 05:57 PM

I do find it intriguing that the colors seen on the glows were red, purple and blue, which all can be explained by atmospheric dispersion. (Purple is a little problematic in this regard, in that it's a combination of red and blue, which in cases of dispersion are separated.) But given that according to the observers a check was made on other features to rule out dispersion and other color aberrations, the phenomenon certainly suggests a possibility of being of lunar origin.

However, introducing some additional doubt is the seeming coincidence of another event in the same area at fairly similar phase a month later. Such coincidences cannot be completely discounted as being potentially indicative of some combination of illumination and instrumental effect...

Given the duration of the events, I'm surprised no good supportive photographs resulted from those obtained. For example, for a red glow the difference between a red filtered image and an unfiltered one should reveal a difference, with the filtered image showing higher brightness where the glow is found.

At the least there should have been a better response in trying to obtain photographic evidence during the second event a month later. After the first event, one might expect the observers to at least formulate a strategy where a brisk response with suitable film emulsions and filters could be effected.

#6 indyanhorse

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 02:40 AM

The second night in november, a camera was ready to produce images and many pictures were made with exposures from 1/5 second to 1/2 second, but the film used was an experimental B/W film called SO136, not sensible to red, almost orthochromatic. The red parts were dull, and the film was destructed with the remains of the observations , due to Reagan Administration budget constraints for
federal agencies.

#7 azure1961p

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 10:12 PM

Well if the film was wrong and the results inconclusive why bring in Ronald Reagan to what was a botched attempt independent of his budget constraints? I see no correlate here.

Pete

#8 indyanhorse

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 02:07 AM

Sorry pete, i didnt want to hurt any Reagan fan, i just made a cut and paste of the last sentence of this document about the failure :http://www.the1963aristarchusevents.com/Failure_to_photograph_November_28th_TLP_2013-07-30.pdf

One solution could be to use a H-alpha filter but i'm not sure it si compatible with an Ir block. Next month will be the 50th anniversary of the observation and there are some opportunities for making pictures with the same illumination.






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