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Moon/clavius a couple of nights ago

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#1 mark8888

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 11:49 PM

Hi all. Here's a point-and-shoot snapshot from a couple of nights ago. Very happy to see a clear sky after many months of clouds. Of course, last night was cloudy again... :smirk:
Here's a much larger version of the original pic:
MOON

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#2 NeilMac

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 11:15 AM

Very nice shot, great detail :)

#3 RobDob

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 12:04 AM

Gotta love the capabilities of a good point'n'shooter!

That's a great pic, Mark. From looking at the big pic, it looks like you're getting about 2.5-3km resolution on those craterlets - pretty dang good. What scope? Eyepiece? Camera?

Rob

#4 mark8888

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 09:41 AM

Hi! Thanks very much for the nice comments, Rob and NeilMac!!

Agreed, you've gotta love the capabilities of a good point and shooter. We talked about this several months ago... since that time, I got the Canon Powershot S110 camera, and that's what I used in the photo above. I find it to be much superior to other point and shooters I've used for afocal astrophotography:
Canon ELPH 510 (while using this camera, I could only get a tiny part of the field in view through the eyepiece)
Canon Powershot 880IS (I'd say this is very good and easy to use, but old at this point, and the S110 is just a much better camera, period).


For the photo above, I used the TEC 180 scope, and I was shooting through a Docter UWA 12.5 eyepiece (I'm pretty sure), on a Mark V binoviewer. I may have been using an AP BARCON barlow.

Here's a similar shot, but taken with my older 880IS camera, through a TEC 140 and a different eyepiece (not sure which, but a Televue). I've found it interesting to compare the difference in resolution: old setup

and here's the new setup: new setup

At the eyepiece, the difference is even more apparent.

The moon was gorgeous last night. Here's a photo taken at 5:03am. Aren't days without work just wonderful? :grin: :p

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#5 NeilMac

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Posted 03 October 2013 - 10:46 AM

fantastic resolution :)

P&S is what I always use, better then my DSLR.

#6 mark8888

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Posted 03 October 2013 - 11:26 AM

fantastic resolution :)

P&S is what I always use, better then my DSLR.


Hey, thanks, and that's a very interesting comment! Why would that be??? I've assumed that resolution-wise, P&S would be worse than DSLR... then the next step up would be planetary camera (which i may be about to get :grin: )

The huge, huge, huge, huge, huge, huge, huge advantage to P&S, as I see it, is that you can do it handheld and then it is a full visual astronomy session, and you just snap a pic when you like what you see. It's also very nice that the pic you get is the object truly captured at a single moment in time as opposed to many images stitched together to appear as one... I dont know that I could get into a DSLR or planetary camera attached to the focuser while looking at a laptop screen. Then again the results can be amazing. Here's a Jupiter I got with a handheld P&S last weekend. I really like it as a document of what I saw and in its own right (it's the best I've ever gotten after much handheld P&S experimenting on Jupiter), but of course it doesnt come close to those stacked planetary camera photos......
Apologies for the planet in the lunar forum :crazy:

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#7 mark8888

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 03:51 AM

Gotta love the capabilities of a good point'n'shooter!

That's a great pic, Mark. From looking at the big pic, it looks like you're getting about 2.5-3km resolution on those craterlets - pretty dang good. What scope? Eyepiece? Camera?

Rob


Hi Mr. RobDob and all others,

What resource do you use to estimate crater diameters? After looking at a bunch of online maps and downloading a program I didn't like, I finally tried out Google Moon: http://www.google.com/moon/ and was able to do it that way, by seaching a crater and then zooming. The scale conveniently changes with each zoom step, and at the end I was able to pretty easily gauge the diameter of various small craterlets (thanks for the idea RobDob). For example. here's Clavius . I'm happy with Google Moon so far, but I'm curious, are there any other sources that are similar or even better for some reason? (I kinda think this may need a new thread but I don't want to clog up the forum :smirk: )

#8 azure1961p

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 07:23 AM

Using a camera of any design handheld is an extremly unreliable way to get consistently good results. The moment you go off acis to the light path you incur aberrations, ghastly CA for example. The camera needs to be mounted to get the best most consistent results.


Pete

#9 mark8888

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 11:29 AM

Using a camera of any design handheld is an extremly unreliable way to get consistently good results. The moment you go off acis to the light path you incur aberrations, ghastly CA for example. The camera needs to be mounted to get the best most consistent results.

Pete


Of course, but then again, if you want to observe and snap pictures of what you're observing, with one scope, it's the only way to do it. And it's a lot of fun. :grin: With some practice you can hold your hands still enough, and if you take a lot of shots some will be OK, sharp, a good record. Here's a handheld point and shoot solar shot I took not long ago, SUN , here's a full moon . Obviously planets are another story and need to be stacked to show a good amount of detail.

#10 NeilMac

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 11:48 AM

A SteadyPix is very handy to use and frees up your hands.

#11 RobDob

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 08:36 PM

Gotta love the capabilities of a good point'n'shooter!

That's a great pic, Mark. From looking at the big pic, it looks like you're getting about 2.5-3km resolution on those craterlets - pretty dang good. What scope? Eyepiece? Camera?

Rob


Hi Mr. RobDob and all others,

What resource do you use to estimate crater diameters? After looking at a bunch of online maps and downloading a program I didn't like, I finally tried out Google Moon: http://www.google.com/moon/ and was able to do it that way, by seaching a crater and then zooming. The scale conveniently changes with each zoom step, and at the end I was able to pretty easily gauge the diameter of various small craterlets (thanks for the idea RobDob). For example. here's Clavius . I'm happy with Google Moon so far, but I'm curious, are there any other sources that are similar or even better for some reason? (I kinda think this may need a new thread but I don't want to clog up the forum :smirk: )


Hey Mark,

Didn't know about Google Moon, that looks like a great tool! I found this pic in the CN archives by photonovore that I use to judge crater resolution in Clavius:

By the way, you've got a really nice setup! Great matchup of scope/eyepieces/camera - your pictures prove it.

Permission to use image by Photonovore: "None of my stuff has any 'copyright'--it's _all_ fair use, open source, whatever you want to call it--in the name of free sharing of information. That's stated on the top of my website as well. BTW, all of the calibrated craterlet images I made are available within the Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas. (and on my website of course.) Someone was selling laminated copies of them as well, but i lost track of who exactly. Glad you find that Clavius one useful! You are exactly who I made it for..." - Whitepeak Observatory

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#12 mark8888

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 02:02 AM

Thanks, and thanks for the link to photonovore's pic! Very clear and helpful.

#13 magic612

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 09:51 AM

What resource do you use to estimate crater diameters?


I used to consult my Rukl atlas, but often found myself flipping back and forth between a bunch of pages. I was then reminded that I had already downloaded Virtual Moon Atlas, which makes it a lot easier to see a given area, and just click on a crater/craterlet and "Voila!" - there's the info about it.

Here's the link: http://www.ap-i.net/avl/en/start

#14 mark8888

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 11:03 AM

Thats looks very good, thank you I'll investigate! :grin:






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