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Interstellarum DEEP SKY ATLAS - It is here!

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#1 Stellarfire

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 08:56 AM

After more than 10 years of preparation, it is finally here and available for sale:

The new Interstellarum Deep Sky Atlas by Ronald Stoyan and Stephan Schurig, printed and distributed by Oculum-Verlag, Erlangen, Germany.

This spiral-bound Atlas has a quadratic size of 28x28cm and is available in two versions (content is the same):

The Normal Version is printed on smooth-coated quality Offset paper, it weights 1'415 grams, price is 79,90 Euros plus shipping.

The Premium Version is printed on water resistant Polyart paper (a synthetic and light paper based on Polyethylene, structure and feel resembles very much to conventional paper), it weights 1'055 grams, price is 129,90 Euros plus shipping.


The publisher's descriptive pages of the Atlas are in German only, use Google Translator to read them:

About the Authors

Philosophy

Features

Sample Pages

Chart Key

Comparison with Uranometria 2000.0 2nd edition

Legend

User Tips


Order Link Normal Version

Order Link Premium Version


The new and unique idea behind this Deep Sky Atlas is that it categorizes the visually observable deep sky objects according their visibility for apertures of 4" (100mm), 8" (200mm), 12" (300mm), and very difficult objects for apertures above 12". The distinction between the four aperture categories is easily recognizable by different font sizes, so the user sees at a glance, if an object is - depending on the limiting magnitude of his observing night & site - within visual reach of his instrument or not. (For the categorizing system by different font sizes, see the "Sample Pages" link above.)
The object visibility for each aperture category in this Atlas is based on a limiting magnitude 6.5 sky and is matched to an experienced observer.

I am a visual-only observer and appreciate the highly practice-oriented concept and layout of Oculum's new Deep Sky Atlas. After a comparo with my other atlasses and maps, there remains no doubt that this new Deep Sky Atlas in the tough and water resistant Premium Version will be my new all time companion at the telescope.

The new Deep Sky Atlas is da bomb, check it out.


Stephan

#2 esd726

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 09:07 AM

Looks nice! :D

#3 amicus sidera

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 02:57 PM

Very nice atlas, indeed... but what's with the slight vertically-offset registration on most of the numbers and labels on the sample charts?

Edited to add: that was an artifact of the .pdf's portrayal at normal magnification; when zoomed a little in it disappeared.

#4 turtle86

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 03:23 PM

Looks great. I like the synthetic paper option offered in the deluxe version, which sounds similar to what was used by Lymax for the Herald-Bobroff. Also like the color. Think I'll be ordering a copy!

#5 Stellarfire

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 03:25 PM

A note on the sample pages: The left column shows four actual maps as they appear in the Deep Sky Atlas.
The right column shows the same maps with explaining labels added, who help to understand the categorizing system.

Stephan
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#6 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 07:04 PM

For the most part, a very attractive offering.

I like how emission and reflection nebulae are color coded red and blue, respectively. (I insisted upon such a scheme back in 2002 when involved with the Desktop Universe software project.)

Oddly, while exceedingly low surface nebulosities are outlined, the brighter specimens often have 'shrunken' outlines, perhaps confining to the brighter isophote. (The Heart nebula, IC1805, is a good example.) I would prefer to see a 'fuller' size, even if it means an additional and different color outline to reflect the fainter extent.

I noted that the symbol for Stock 23 (Pazmino's cluster) is noticeably offset from the stellar group. Makes me wonder if some catalogue data are older and still containing innaccurate positions.

I prefer to not have 'common' DSO name labels printed in addition to the catalog ID, although here it doesn't seem to result in bad clutter.

#7 rockethead26

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 09:00 PM

German language only? It has an interesting mix of English and German common names.

#8 derangedhermit

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Posted 03 October 2013 - 10:07 PM

I'm embarrassed to be all provincial and unilingual, but with the sunk costs, wouldn't an English version for the UK and US make financial sense?

#9 amicus sidera

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 07:04 AM

I'm embarrassed to be all provincial and unilingual(snip)


I'm not. Make it all in English, or no sale.

Fred

#10 swalker

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 11:11 AM

Looks beautiful, though i don't speak or read other languages besides english, so its not for me.
One problem with the red/blue nebulae colors- the red ones will be invisible when used in the field with red flashlights.

#11 Stellarfire

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 12:43 PM

Looks beautiful, though i don't speak or read other languages besides english, so its not for me.

Map 30 left page Cygnus et al: "Cloverleaf Nebula", "Seahorse Nebula", "Patchick I", "Campbell's Hydrogen Star", "Snail Cluster", "Fish on a Platter". Well, I see a lot of English names. :)
And the Legend of Stars and Deep Sky Objects, which is printed on the inside of front cover (Normal Version), respectively attached in card form to the inside of front cover (Premium Version), even if in German, is quite easy to be understood by international users. Ok, ok, or allow 3 minutes to get used to it.



One problem with the red/blue nebulae colors- the red ones will be invisible when used in the field with red flashlights.

Yes. But the good part is that their b/w contour lines remain fully visible.


Stephan

#12 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 02:56 PM

I see no milky way isophotes. Indeed, I think the time is ripe for even such symbol-based charts to include a rather detailed continuous tone milky way of at least moderate detail. Along the lines of the Pocket Sky Atlas, but of far higher fidelity.

It seems the lovely carbon stars have been overlooked. This is a nice feature of the aforementioned PSA.

For nebulae, I would rather see a grading based on a representative surface brightness. The halfway experienced observer knows that at given surface brightness smaller objects require larger apertures. Or that at given size, higher surface brightness objects can be seen with smaller apertures.

The scheme of indicating a preferred filter (letter "O" for O-III, "U" for UHC and "H" for H-beta) for emission nebulae is a sound idea. I wonder if using color to differentiate might not be feasible? After all, the fundamental differentiator in most cases is the ratio of hydrogen to oxygen emission near 500nm.

Where there is is little or no oxygen emission, nebulae are dominated enormously by H-alpha, which makes a photo more pure red. If we use the H-alpha as the surrogate for H-beta, such a nebula is shown in a shade of red (appropriate for the surface brightness/visibility index.)

When oxygen emission becomes increasingly prominent, a photo takes on a pink or bluish-purple or even green hue (depending on sensor response and filtration.) Such nebulae could be colored purple, which is red and blue combined. (We don't want to use green, for planetaries--which are mostly oxygen-dominant--already use this color.)

And so red hued nebulae would be better seen with an H-beta filter, and purple hued nebulae would benefit from a UHC or O-III.

If we wished to differentiate between the near-equal hydrogen/oxygen emitters from those more prominently oxygen emitters, a third color could be used. Blue-green? Yes, it gets potentially confusing when breaking down to ever finer tints, and of course color blind users are not so well served. I guess I'm just rambling on about my own preferences, which would attempt to incorporate and show actual physical characteristics, and not rely on potentially arbitrary and ill-defined criteria as based on other, very human observer impressions.

#13 DavidNealMinnick

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 07:20 PM

I'm embarrassed to be all provincial and unilingual(snip)


I'm not. Make it all in English, or no sale.

Fred


Same here. Too bad.

#14 macpurity

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 08:36 PM

German doesn't deter me, so I'm thinking about it. Like the colors. I doubt I'd use this at the scope, so it works for me as a planning tool. Might be a nice addition beyond the B&W Uranometria or Millennial Atlases. 80 Euros puts it at about US$108. Single volume is a bit pricey, but as a useful coffee table book, I might bite!

#15 Stellarfire

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 01:58 AM

I doubt I'd use this at the scope, so it works for me as a planning tool. Might be a nice addition beyond the B&W Uranometria or Millennial Atlases. 80 Euros puts it at about US$108. Single volume is a bit pricey, but as a useful coffee table book, I might bite!



Hi MacP,

Since I purchased both Versions, I can compare them well. Maybe the heavier Normal Version printed on conventional paper, weighting 1'415 grams, might be described as coffee table book.

But I can assure you by personal experience that the water resistant and light Premium Version is perfectly suited as tough workhorse outdoors at the telescope.
At 28x28cm (11x11 inches) and 1'055 grams, it is surprisingly compact and handy. With its very tough and 100% water resistant cover made of Priplak, you can put it elsewhere you want. Opened, it stays perfectly flat, no matter which map is needed. If any of the Polyart pages gets wet from dew, or even rain or snow, just gently pass a soft cotton cloth to absorb the water, later, at room temperature, the pages will dry perfectly and fast without getting wrinkled or otherwise damaged. Even if exposed to a heavy full day rainfall, it would survive without any damage. I have never before seen such a thing.

I intended to purchase the expensive Premium Version not as coffee table book, but as though outdoors companion and feel really impressed how it meets my high expectations. This one is the real MacCoy.

Stephan

#16 Stellarfire

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 10:45 AM

Did anyone else buy this new Deep Sky Atlas from Oculum, and if yes, what is the opinion about it?

Stephan

#17 csa/montana

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 10:54 AM

Looks beautiful, though i don't speak or read other languages besides english, so its not for me.



Same for me.

#18 turtle86

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 08:19 PM

Looks beautiful, though i don't speak or read other languages besides english, so its not for me.



Same for me.


I was originally planning to buy this, but have since reconsidered for this reason. If an English version is ever published, I would buy it.

#19 Stellarfire

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 03:19 AM

Well, a representative of Oculum told me that an English edition of the Deep Sky Atlas is not an impossible thing in the future, but they first have to find a right partner for such a cooperation.

In my opinion, an English edition will not change that much. The key part of the Atlas are the 114 double-paged maps and their layout and symbols are self-explaining for international users too.

At present there is no other water resistant Atlas like this available on the market: Optimized for the visual observer, it not only shows all visible NGC objects, but also contains the following complete (!) catalogues: Abell (PN), Arp, Basel, Barnard, Berkeley, Bochum, Fleming, Hartl-Weinberger, Hickson, Holmberg, Klemola, King, Menzel, Messier, Palomar, Terzan, Stock, Tombaugh and Trümpler. Plus 371 stars with known exoplanets.

All their symbols - and therefore the map readability in general - would be the same in an English edition.

Stephan

#20 turtle86

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 09:06 AM

You make a good case, but I'd still prefer an English version. Another problem is that they don't have an English website like some other vendors, and I'm not sure that you can place an order after using Google Translate.

#21 Stellarfire

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 09:45 AM

Rob, their German order link is as international as it gets :)

As far as I know, they added ALL overseas countries to their dropdown country list, check here (no Google Translator needed):

Order link Premium Version

To give an example for a buyer located in the U.S.A.: Just fill in the forename at "Vorname", name at "Nachname", street and street number at "Strasse/Hausnr.", zip code and town at "PLZ/Ort". Then click on the dropdown button next to "Land" (country) which opens the country list, scroll down and click on "Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika" (United States of America). Fill the e-mail address field, confirm the units ordered at "Menge" (units). Finish by clicking below on "Premiumversion sofort kaufen" and you are done! As easy as it gets.

After placing the order, a confirmation e-mail is sent to the buyer's e-mail address. Any e-mailed questions may be asked and will be responded in English language.

They are cool enough to ship without prepayment (!), at least to European customers (I do not know if this policy applies to overseas customers too, but I think so). They trust in their customers. Who else on the market still does this kind of customer-friendly service of decades long ago...

Stephan

#22 pjglad

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 11:08 AM

I do not know much about paper weight. Is the normal version kind of like Uranometria grade paper?

#23 Ragaisis

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 11:09 AM

Given it's an sky atlas, not having it entirely in English really isn't a big deal. I can interpolate fairly easily. So that's not an issue.

It's just a matter if I want to spend $180 (and then shipping would be added).

Chris

#24 esd726

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 11:13 AM

Given it's an sky atlas, not having it entirely in English really isn't a big deal. I can interpolate fairly easily. So that's not an issue.

It's just a matter if I want to spend $180 (and then shipping would be added).

Chris

This is how I feel also. I think it LOOKS great, but I don't have that much $ just laying around, esp to use on another atlas :(.

#25 faackanders2

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 11:34 AM

For the most part, a very attractive offering.

I like how emission and reflection nebulae are color coded red and blue, respectively. (I insisted upon such a scheme back in 2002 when involved with the Desktop Universe software project.)

Oddly, while exceedingly low surface nebulosities are outlined, the brighter specimens often have 'shrunken' outlines, perhaps confining to the brighter isophote. (The Heart nebula, IC1805, is a good example.) I would prefer to see a 'fuller' size, even if it means an additional and different color outline to reflect the fainter extent.

I noted that the symbol for Stock 23 (Pazmino's cluster) is noticeably offset from the stellar group. Makes me wonder if some catalogue data are older and still containing innaccurate positions.

I prefer to not have 'common' DSO name labels printed in addition to the catalog ID, although here it doesn't seem to result in bad clutter.


I also like the distinction is color symbos of reflection, emission, and dark nebulae. I like the attempt to show how easy or hart an objects apparent magnitude is (darker for smaller scopes vs. fainter for larger scopes required). This may be a first. :grin:

Do they have an engish legend, etc? :question:






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