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Nebula Filters in Finder Scope

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#1 Philler

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 07:28 PM

This is something I have never tried; using a Neb. filter screwed into the finder scope ep and into the star diagonal or scope itself. I have an 8 x50 RA Orion finder mounted on my Dob. and was thinking of screwing a Lumicon Deep Sky Filter into the finder's ep. The EP looks like a Kelner, not sure what effect the cross-hairs will have, but I thought I might give it a try. I thought about also using a low power Plossl I have, 26mm, but I am not sure the objective focus will allow enough focus travel distance. I just thought this might make a difference with a better view on some large nebula. Anyway, if someone has tried this, let me know what you think, or if this works worth a darn, or is just a waste of time.

#2 kfiscus

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 08:05 PM

No experience with this but looking forward to hearing your results. This could be really nice with the M-42 neighborhood, North American Neb, maybe even parts of Barnard's Loop if you have super dark skies.

#3 Bill Weir

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 08:45 PM

Why don't you just try it?

I have a 80mm finder on my 12.5" scope. I've used a filter, H-Beta or Ultrablock with it many times. I use the 25mm plossl that came with my 6" dob. I just slide the eyepiece in and out until there's focus. The H-Beta with the finder and eyepiece are fabulous on the California Nebula.

So give it a try and report back.

Bill

#4 Philler

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 10:00 PM

Why don't you just try it?

I have a 80mm finder on my 12.5" scope. I've used a filter, H-Beta or Ultrablock with it many times. I use the 25mm plossl that came with my 6" dob. I just slide the eyepiece in and out until there's focus. The H-Beta with the finder and eyepiece are fabulous on the California Nebula.

So give it a try and report back.

Bill


I might just try sliding the 26mm Plossl in and out of the star diagonal, or just loosen the diagonal and slide it in and out of the finder and see what happens. Thanks Bill and clear skies.

#5 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 12:21 AM

Nebula filters work perfectly with small apertures. I've been doing this with binoculars for years. A 10X50 bino with a pair of 2" UHC filters taped over the objectives is AWESOME! If a finder's eyepiece can have a 1.25" filter attached, this will work very well for the larger nebulae. Such specimens as the California, North America, Heart and Soul, gamma Cygni, Veil, Barnard's Loop, Pacman, and more, really benefit at such magnifications and apertures.

My current home-made bino (see my Gallery, linked to below), for which I can swap 50mm and 60mm objectives, uses telescope 1.25" and 2" eyepieces, and so I can thread filters onto them. I use the Orion Ultrablock and Baader H-beta.

#6 David Knisely

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 01:10 AM

This is something I have never tried; using a Neb. filter screwed into the finder scope ep and into the star diagonal or scope itself. I have an 8 x50 RA Orion finder mounted on my Dob. and was thinking of screwing a Lumicon Deep Sky Filter into the finder's ep. The EP looks like a Kelner, not sure what effect the cross-hairs will have, but I thought I might give it a try. I thought about also using a low power Plossl I have, 26mm, but I am not sure the objective focus will allow enough focus travel distance. I just thought this might make a difference with a better view on some large nebula. Anyway, if someone has tried this, let me know what you think, or if this works worth a darn, or is just a waste of time.


I once dropped my 2" Lumicon OIII filter into the dewshield of my Orion 9x50 RACI finderscope to see both sides of the Veil at the same time (5 degree true field of view). This kind of blew away the so-called claims of the OIII needing an 8 inch to work. Of course, I can see both sides of the Veil with my 100mm f/6 refractor at 15x with the OIII screwed into the eyepiece (4.39 degree true field of view) and with somewhat better results, but it was nice to see that trick work with only a 2 inch aperture. Clear skies to you.

#7 youngamateur42

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 10:37 AM

Finders are the absolute best low power scopes for viewing extended nebulae, its should prove a real treat on the Orion Nebula, and if your have darker skies, The Veil should be awesome

#8 Philler

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 02:30 AM

Nebula filters work perfectly with small apertures. I've been doing this with binoculars for years. A 10X50 bino with a pair of 2" UHC filters taped over the objectives is AWESOME! If a finder's eyepiece can have a 1.25" filter attached, this will work very well for the larger nebulae. Such specimens as the California, North America, Heart and Soul, gamma Cygni, Veil, Barnard's Loop, Pacman, and more, really benefit at such magnifications and apertures.

My current home-made bino (see my Gallery, linked to below), for which I can swap 50mm and 60mm objectives, uses telescope 1.25" and 2" eyepieces, and so I can thread filters onto them. I use the Orion Ultrablock and Baader H-beta.


The 8x50 finder's eyepiece as well as all my eyepieces are threaded and will accept the neb filter. I will probably do some experimenting and find out what works best.

#9 hokkaido53

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 11:51 AM

Filters can do amazing things with binos, and vice-versa. I had tried for a long time to detect the Wich Head nebula (IC2118) through my scope, but didn't really see it until I placed a narrowband filter over one of the objectives of an old pair of Zeiss 6x30 binoculars. And there it was, shining bright next to Rigel.

To my surprise, I learned a few days later that the Witch Head is a reflection nebula, illumined by Rigel, and therefore, I should not have been able to see it at all with a narrowband filter! Let's all try to figure that out. :question:

- Roy in Taos

#10 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 05:31 PM

The Witch Head seems to be not as bluish a reflection nebula as many. And so near 500nm (which moreover is at the peak of sensitivity of the dark adapted eye) the surface brightness is still reasonably high, permitting the use of a narrow band filter. Furthermore, being located well away from its illuminating star (Rigel) avoids the 'contamination' of such a distracting source. Imagine if Rigel were superimposed?






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